Hoyer: Recent spike in COVID cases due to Easter, spring break travel | State Journal News




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Planning a long road trip this Eid break in UAE? Here are tips to keep you safe


Dubai: With the long Eid Al Fitr break getting underway, residents are sure to embark on long inter-emirate road trips with friends and family.

Experts, however, have a word of caution. Here’s what they have to say as they share some practical tips to ensure that your journey is smooth and safe.

Naser Shashaa

Naser Shashaa, vice-president, Michelin Middle East and North Africa, told Gulf News: “Expect this Eid to see a large number of road travel to be with family and loved ones. For ultimate safe journey and peace of mind, we highly recommend checking your vehicle a couple of days prior to the road trip. Avoid checking your car the night before to avoid surprises.”

Start with tyre check

Shashaa also shared some practical tips — with a focus on tyre check — prior to the journey: “Start with a visual examination of the tyre condition. Check the tyre tread depth as a worn-out tread can result in loss of traction.”

“Also make sure to check the spare wheel and have it in top shape. The spare tyre is often overlooked, but in an emergency situation, it can make the difference between being stranded and delayed,” he added.

Shashaa advised: “No matter how long the trip is, keep an eye on how much you pack and how much weight it will add on. An overloaded car might not be able to take the extra weight and perform at its full capacity, while also impacting the tyre performance.”

It is always advised to carry a puncture-repair kit with a tyre inflator. It is fairly easy to use and can be a saviour in an emergency situation.

Before the long road trip, go for a short drive the day before to make sure the car is not feeling odd in terms of handling. While on the drive, check if the car is pulling to one side. If it is, the alignment might be out of place. You need to get it checked and fixed.

‘Be extra careful, always’

P.M. Abdul Razak, operations manager at Emirates Driving Institute, has one cardinal rule while on the road: “Be extra careful, always.”

P.M. Abdul Razak

“The Eid holiday season is here. Our roads are expected to witness peak traffic as thousands of people from other emirates or countries take a break to spend some quality time with their loved ones. It is a time when drivers need to be extra careful on the roads. There is a significant surge in road accidents and fatalities during almost every holiday period,” Razak noted.

He continued: “Some of the causes of these accidents include heavy volume of traffic; drivers having fun with co-passengers while driving; people visiting from other emirates not being too familiar with the city and its roads. Another reason could be drowsiness and stress due to the long drive.”

Here are the safety reminders from Razak to enjoy the holiday trip:

1. Prepare the car

Perform a basic check to ensure the car is ready for a long drive. Check oil levels, wiper fluid, fuel level, and tyre condition. All passengers must buckle up and use an appropriate child safety seat for children.

2. Plan the trip

Leave plenty of extra time on your trip. Delays must be anticipated when driving long distances. Having extra time can help you stay relaxed. Remember, the shortest route is not necessarily the fastest route always. Aim to avoid roads that are prone to congestion during peak hours. 3. Pack smart

Make sure you have enough water, food, basic medical supplies and toiletries.

4. Share the task

Driving long distances can be tiring. So, try to take breaks and share the steering. Some are good at navigating, others may not read a map that well. Know who does what well and share the tasks by talent and preference.

5. Stay alert

Be aware that some drivers are unfamiliar with your city and its roads. These drivers may act surprisingly at the last moment, just before a junction or exit. Keep sufficient distance from vehicles.

6. Follow the rules and regulations

Strictly follow the rules and regulations, drive according to the road traffic condition within the speed limit, maintain safe distance always and stop your vehicle always at a safe place.

Tyre safety

Did you know tyre-related accidents contribute to around five per cent of UAE’s total traffic death toll? This is why it is very important that tyres must be procured, fitted and maintained properly.

Dubai’s Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) recommends replacing tyres no later than five years, or earlier if the remaining tread depth is below 1.6mm. Tyres must also be replaced if there are other signs of wear or damage, for example, cracks or cuts in the sidewall, parts of the tread band are damaged, etc.

It is highly recommended that all four tyres are replaced at the same time, especially on permanent four-wheel drive vehicles to avoid mechanical damage. If only two tyres are replaced on a two-wheel drive vehicle, it is recommended that the new tyres be fitted to the rear axle for vehicle stability and safer handling.

Keep in mind: Use only reputable branded and certified tyres. Avoid fitting tyres that may be substandard and therefore potentially unsafe. Use the correct tyre type and dimension for your vehicle (refer to the vehicle owner’s manual or ask for expert advise if not sure).

Check tyre pressure at least once a month using a reliable or calibrated gauge. The recommended pressures are quoted in the vehicle owner’s manual or on a sticker usually attached to a door frame or fuel cover. Make sure that the pressures are checked when the tyres are ‘cold’, i.e. driven less than 3km before the check.

Avoid driving over or near hazardous objects that could damage the tyres and make them unsafe or unfit for service, for example, rocks, glass, potholes, kerbs etc. Regularly check the age of the spare tyre, condition and air pressure to avoid having a spare tyre that is unfit for use.



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Anti-dopers wrestle with paying informants to break sports’ code of silence


Anti-doping organisations are torn over a suggestion from the director general of the International Cycling Union (ICU) to pay sports insiders to inform on their rivals or colleagues.

“We need information from the peloton. We need Radio Peloton,” Amina Lanaya told a French newspaper earlier this year.

To fight what she called “a form of omerta” in her sport she said the UCI needed to “infiltrate the peloton, infiltrate certain teams, pay for ‘grasses’.”

Paid criminal informants are a staple of police work in many countries, but Lanaya’s suggestion that sport adopts the same approach has led to debate in the anti-doping community, even as they acknowledge that some of the biggest cases in recent years were broken thanks to tip-offs.

One of the biggest scandals in history, the vast system of institutionalised doping in Russia, gained world-wide attention in 2014 when German broadcaster ARD released a series of documentaries based on information from Vitaly Stepanov, a former an employee of Russia’s anti-doing agency RUSADA, and his wife, runner Yulia Stepanova.

“It is essential to have informants,” said Damien Ressiot, head of the investigation department at the French anti-doping agency (AFLD), who pointed out that of the 11 violations of anti-doping rules, only one involved testing.

“And on the other ten, we only get them by investigating,” he explains.

Those categories include the athlete’s whereabouts failures, tampering with samples, possession as well as threats or retaliation against informants.

Yet Ressiot is not convinced that paying informants will work.

“I don’t see the point,” he says.

Guenter Younger, a former German policeman and Interpol officer who is the head of the investigations at the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), agreed.

“I’m not a big fan, to be honest,” he told AFP.

– ‘None asked to be paid’ –

While Younger said some informants are driven by idealism and a desire “for clean sport”, Ressiot added “but also sometimes by envy, or for other reasons.”

The AFLD and WADA have both created dedicated tip web sites.

“We have a lot of information through this channel,” said Ressiot, adding that the AFLD received 80 reports in 2021 on its site.

Younger says that WADA’s five-year-old ‘Speak Up!’ web page has also been highly productive.

He said “none of the informants over the past five years has asked to be paid”.

WADA can offer financial aid for “substantial assistance” by informants but, said Younger, these are used more as an expense allowance “for whistleblowers, if they have to travel to a place for example.”

The aid is also used to protect and escort athletes caught doping who decide to collaborate.

“This has already happened in the past,” says Ressiot.

But, he says, the AFLD has never taken on paid informants.

Younger says handing over cash for tips raises practical questions.

“It would be a problem for me to pay for something without knowing what it will be,” he said.

“I would probably ask for the information before knowing if I should pay for it, I would evaluate it and then I would ask for the price.”

Other observers support Lanaya.

“There is a very strong omerta in the sports world. Anything that can break it is a good thing,” said Pim Verschuuren, who works on sports governance at the French Institut de Relations Internationales et Strategiques

But, he warns, “by creating informants, we will place athletes in risky situations, they will be exposed and perhaps in danger. It must be minimal.”

cto/ll/dlo/pb/dj



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Anti-dopers wrestle with paying informants to break sports’ code of silence


Issued on: Modified:

Paris (AFP) – Anti-doping organisations are torn over a suggestion from the director general of the International Cycling Union (ICU) to pay sports insiders to inform on their rivals or colleagues.

“We need information from the peloton. We need Radio Peloton,” Amina Lanaya told a French newspaper earlier this year.

To fight what she called “a form of omerta” in her sport she said the UCI needed to “infiltrate the peloton, infiltrate certain teams, pay for ‘grasses’.”

Paid criminal informants are a staple of police work in many countries, but Lanaya’s suggestion that sport adopts the same approach has led to debate in the anti-doping community, even as they acknowledge that some of the biggest cases in recent years were broken thanks to tip-offs.

One of the biggest scandals in history, the vast system of institutionalised doping in Russia, gained world-wide attention in 2014 when German broadcaster ARD released a series of documentaries based on information from Vitaly Stepanov, a former an employee of Russia’s anti-doing agency RUSADA, and his wife, runner Yulia Stepanova.

“It is essential to have informants,” said Damien Ressiot, head of the investigation department at the French anti-doping agency (AFLD), who pointed out that of the 11 violations of anti-doping rules, only one involved testing.

“And on the other ten, we only get them by investigating,” he explains.

Those categories include the athlete’s whereabouts failures, tampering with samples, possession as well as threats or retaliation against informants.

Yet Ressiot is not convinced that paying informants will work.

“I don’t see the point,” he says.

Guenter Younger, a former German policeman and Interpol officer who is the head of the investigations at the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), agreed.

“I’m not a big fan, to be honest,” he told AFP.

‘None asked to be paid’

While Younger said some informants are driven by idealism and a desire “for clean sport”, Ressiot added “but also sometimes by envy, or for other reasons.”

The AFLD and WADA have both created dedicated tip web sites.

“We have a lot of information through this channel,” said Ressiot, adding that the AFLD received 80 reports in 2021 on its site.

Younger says that WADA’s five-year-old ‘Speak Up!’ web page has also been highly productive.

He said “none of the informants over the past five years has asked to be paid”.

WADA can offer financial aid for “substantial assistance” by informants but, said Younger, these are used more as an expense allowance “for whistleblowers, if they have to travel to a place for example.”

The aid is also used to protect and escort athletes caught doping who decide to collaborate.

“This has already happened in the past,” says Ressiot.

But, he says, the AFLD has never taken on paid informants.

Younger says handing over cash for tips raises practical questions.

“It would be a problem for me to pay for something without knowing what it will be,” he said.

“I would probably ask for the information before knowing if I should pay for it, I would evaluate it and then I would ask for the price.”

Other observers support Lanaya.

“There is a very strong omerta in the sports world. Anything that can break it is a good thing,” said Pim Verschuuren, who works on sports governance at the French Institut de Relations Internationales et Strategiques

But, he warns, “by creating informants, we will place athletes in risky situations, they will be exposed and perhaps in danger. It must be minimal.”



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Spring break travel tips for families


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) –

As people move into a more open phase of the pandemic, a lot of families are unsure of how to travel with young children and make the most out of their time together.

That’s where YouTube creator and parenting coach Nekole Amber Eaton comes in with tips for how to use your spring break trip to regroup as a family.

Copyright 2022 WSAZ. All rights reserved.



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COVID-19 cases rise with spring break travel


SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – It’s spring break for many students across the country, some with travel plans, as cases of COVID-19 are starting to trend back up.

According to a national survey, more than half of Americans are planning a trip this spring. 37% are planning to travel during spring break, that’s an increase from last year. Meanwhile, the latest DPH data indicates COVID cases are steadily increasing, today at just over 1200. Compared to the same time last month at 625. 22News spoke with people who plan to travel for spring break.

“My plans are to come home and visit my family here, this year my family and I are able to go out more. Last year when I came back I took a covid test before I came, and then I pretty much stayed in the house with them and this year we can now go do stuff which is fun,” said Chloe Larouche of Northampton.

The same data also indicates that both hospitalizations and deaths are decreasing.



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Spring Break Road Trip? Be Smart About Packing Your SUV


If you’re headed out of town on a road trip this spring or summer, you’re going to want to pack your SUV as efficiently as you can. Long travel in an SUV is not only doable, but it can also be a lot of fun. It’s important to make sure that your SUV is set up for success, though. Otherwise, you may find yourself digging through bags and climbing over seats to find something that you need. Here is the best way to pack an SUV for a road trip to reduce your stress and maximize your fun.

A gray 2022 Chevy Suburban parked in front of a mountain.

2022 Chevy Suburban | Chevrolet

How do I pack an SUV for a road trip?

RELATED: 3 Full-Size 2022 SUVs That Won’t Destroy Your Gas Budget



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AAA shares tips for those traveling this Easter break


(WWTI) — With the Easter vacation quickly approaching, AAA is advising residents on how to make sure their travels go smoothly. According to a press release from the company, they have seen a surge in bookings prior to the holiday.

Director of Travel at AAA Western and Central New York Brian Murray explained which destinations are popular this time of year in a press release from the company.

“Many families are taking advantage of Easter break from area schools to take long-awaited vacations,” Murray said. “Florida beaches and theme parks are extremely popular while mid-Atlantic destinations are calling road trippers.”

AAA also released several tips for travelers as airlines continue to experience disruptions and gas prices remain high. Firstly, the company suggested those flying arrive at the airport extra early, especially for top destinations like Florida.

According to AAA research, although some are choosing to drive to their destination, 75% of US adults say they would change their driving habits or lifestyle if the cost of gasoline rises to $5.00 per gallon. Younger and older adults respond to gas price increases the same way.

However, historically, high gas prices have not deterred people from traveling, and that is the case this Easter. Looking ahead, 52% of U.S. adults have summer vacation plans this year, according to AAA research. Of those, 42% would not consider a change regardless of the price of gas.

The company suggested travelers work with a travel agent and consider locking in pricing on tours or cruises now in case of prices rise, to ensure they get the best price. They also suggested individuals research travel insurance for every trip to protect their investment and plan ahead as much as possible by booking early.



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AAA shares tips for those driving, flying to Easter break destinations | WWTI


(WWTI) — With the Easter vacation quickly approaching, AAA is advising residents on how to make sure their travels go smoothly.

According to a press release from the company, they have seen a surge in bookings prior to the holiday. Director of Travel at AAA Western and Central New York Brian Murray explained which destinations are popular this time of year in a press release from the company.

“Many families are taking advantage of Easter break from area schools to take long-awaited vacations,” Murray said. “Florida beaches and theme parks are extremely popular while mid-Atlantic destinations are calling road trippers.”

AAA also released several tips for travelers as airlines continue to experience disruptions and gas prices remain high. Firstly, the company suggested those flying arrive at the airport extra early, especially for top destinations like Florida.

According to AAA research, although some are choosing to drive to their destination, 75% of US adults say they would change their driving habits or lifestyle if the cost of gasoline rises to $5.00 per gallon. Younger and older adults respond to gas price increases the same way.

However, historically, high gas prices have not deterred people from traveling, and that is the case this Easter. Looking ahead, 52% of U.S. adults have summer vacation plans this year, according to AAA research. Of those, 42% would not consider a change regardless of the price of gas.

The company suggested travelers work with a travel agent and consider locking in pricing on tours or cruises now in case prices rise, to ensure they get the best price. They also suggested individuals research travel insurance for every trip to protect their investment and plan ahead as much as possible by booking early.



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