Flight attendant tip: Get a good night’s sleep at a hotel and close the curtains with a ha | Travel News | Travel


One commenter on TikTok said: “Solid gold tip. Why do the curtains never completely shut?”

Victoria responded: “I have no idea! But it’s super annoying when it happens.”

One traveller shared their own tip, saying: “I use a big claw hair clip but that’s a good one!”

A huge hair clip could also keep a hotel’s curtains closed but it might not work if the curtains are particularly heavy.

Most hotels have floor length curtains which can be a lot heavier than ones in an average household.





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Residents upset as Niangala waste station set to close, forcing locals to use Dungowan dumps – The Northern Daily Leader



Residents upset as Niangala waste station set to close, forcing locals to use Dungowan dumps  The Northern Daily Leader



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Why you should cut your airport arrival time as close as possible


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Welcome to The Upgrade, By The Way’s new series on travel hacks and hot takes. See how to submit here.

We’ve heard it a million times: Arrive for your domestic flight two hours before departure. For international, make it three.

If you’re departing during peak times, airlines say, you should allow even more time. Many might look at this and say, “Well, obviously!” I, on the other hand, see some sort of twisted joke.

Listen to your dad: Get up early on vacation

The primary objective for me when flying out of my home airport is to get in the cab or ride-share as close to my departure time as physics — and prevailing traffic patterns — will allow. I live about 5 miles from Los Angeles International Airport and if my scheduled domestic flight is at, say, 9 a.m., I’m comfortable entering an Uber up until 8:32 a.m.

It’s a mad-dash ritual that requires expeditiousness by way of TSA PreCheck as well as CLEAR. And it hasn’t let me down yet.

But why risk it, you ask?

As a travel writer, I spend hours in airports. Trust me when I tell you, they’re not that great. Even the newest, glitziest and most glamorous among them are nothing more than malls with departure gates. The Jewel at Changhi Airport in Singapore, probably the most impressive airport on the planet, is just a crowded shopping center that happens to hold an indoor waterfall. I don’t like malls, but I do love traveling. So I tolerate walking through them when what’s on the other side is the boarding ramp to my next adventure.

How to cut your airport time down

What I can’t tolerate, however, is wasting away minutes in that loathsome in-between: playing human Plinko in chaotic crowds, fighting for precious electrical socket space, avoiding fast food options cynically repackaged as the brainchild of some celebrity chef. To make matters worse, my go-to hubs have doubled as active construction zones.

Scary stuff, indeed. And even scarier when you consider the potential aggregate cost at stake. Let’s say I’m departing my home airport 60 times in a given year (a conservative estimate for someone in this profession). If I’m arriving two hours early, I’ve surrendered five days of my life to LAX. That’s five days a year of unfettered device-charging, enjoying home-cooked fresh fare while basking in the privacy of my own bed.

How to survive 12 hours in an airport

Now obviously this airport … umm, strategy, let’s call it, isn’t for the faint of heart. In fact, it gives my partner immeasurable anxiety. Perhaps it instills the same in you just by reading. And trust me, there have been some thrillingly close calls. Yet there is method to my madness. I reserve the exercise exclusively for when I’m traveling solo, domestic and in surroundings with which I’m eminently well-versed. It’s wholly contingent on express security lanes. And checked luggage is clearly a non-starter — but that’s a topic for a different day.

In the meantime for those who like to hurry up and wait, the TSA two-hour policy remains a reasonable one. I’m into hurry up and go, however. So I’ll continue to read it less like suggestion and more like satire — until the day I run up to a closed gate. Then the joke’s on me.



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Fuel station, recreation stop by Lake Powell to close ‘until further notice’


An undated photo of the Hite Ranger Station located in San Juan County. The ranger station will remain open but other amenities in the Hite area will close on Friday “until further notice,” the National Park Service announced. (National Park Service)

Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

HITE, San Juan County — If you’re looking for gas at the northern tip of the Glen Canyon Recreation Area, you will have to travel farther to get it.

Hite mostly serves as a refuel, recreation and camping area today. Located along state Route 95, a 126-mile highway between Hanksville in Wayne County and Blanding in San Juan County, the ghost town offers the only refueling area between those towns, as well as the most northern access to Lake Powell.

But National Park Service officials warn that fuel service and most other visitor services in the area of Hite will be out of service starting this Friday as the agency searches for a new concessioner.

The contract of the current concessioner, listed as Hite Adventure Outpost, expires at the end of Thursday, according to a spokeswoman for the Glen Canyon Recreation Area. Gas, retail, a visitor comfort station and designated camping areas will then remain closed “until further notice,” officials said. Per the Glen Powell Recreation Area website, the concession area also offers recreation rentals.

“We are working on getting a new contract out for bids so we can issue the contract again for business services at Hite,” the agency wrote, in an email to KSL.com Monday.

Until service returns, motorists will have to either fuel up in Hanksville, a little over 50 miles to the west, or Blanding, which is nearly 80 miles to the east.

The Hite ramp is also one of many Lake Powell ramps closed as a result of its record-low water levels. The park service states that the ramp is inoperable for both houseboats and small water vessels because the lake has dried up around the ramp.

Lake Powell is currently listed at 3,523.5 feet elevation, or just below one-fourth full, according to the Bureau of Reclamation. Despite the low levels, the National Park Service reported that over 3.1 million people visited the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area last year.

There is some good news for people recreating at Lake Powell or the national parks in and around southeast Utah. The Hite Ranger Station will remain open throughout the service closure, providing public restrooms, a fresh drinking water spigot, and an RV sewer dump station service in the area.

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Biden: U.S. to Close Airspace to Russian Aircraft


The United States will close its airspace to Russian aircraft, effective, President Joe Biden announced Tuesday night during his State of the Union address to Congress.

Biden cited Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine as justification for the airspace closure. The United States will join the European Union and Canada in closing its airspace; Russia subsequently closed its airspace to those countries. 



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Lady Raiders close out two-game road swing at OU


NORMAN, Okla. – The Texas Tech Lady Raiders close out a two-game road swing Wednesday night when they travel to Norman to face the No. 15 Oklahoma Sooners.

Tech and OU are meeting for the first time since Jan. 2, the Lady Raiders opening game of Big 12 conference play.

INSIDE THE MATCHUP:

MATCHUP:
Texas Tech (9-14, 2-10 Big 12) at No. 15 Oklahoma (20-4, 9-3 Big 12)

LOCATION: Norman, Okla.

DATE: February 15, 2022

TIME: 6 p.m.

LAST TIME OUT:

Despite another 20 point performance from Vivian Gray and a double-double from Taylah Thomas, the Texas Tech Lady Raiders fell 62-58 to Oklahoma State Cowgirls Saturday night. With her 20-point performance Gray moved to within 28 points of reaching the 2,000-point mark at the D-I level. Gray has scored almost 2,400 points when you include her D-II numbers at Fort Collins. Thomas had 14 points and 10 rebounds for her seventh double-double of the season. OSU held a large advantage at the charity stripe, outscoring Tech 21-9. The Lady Raiders were just 9-of-14 from the line, while OSU made its first 18 FTs before shooting 21-of-27 from the line. The 10 rebound performance was Thomas’ second consecutive game with at least 10 boards.

SCOUTING THE SOONERS:

Oklahoma enters Wednesday’s matchup ranked No. 15 in both this week’s AP poll and the coach’s poll. The Sooners are 20-4 overall and 9-3 in Big 12 play. Led by a pair of seniors in Taylor Robertson and Madi Williams, the Sooners are averaging an impressive 85.3 points a game this season, the second most in D-I. OU is coming off its worst offensive performance of the season last Saturday against UT, where they scored just 63 points, the lowest they have scored all season. In fact, OU has been held below 70 points just three times all season (vs. UT, at UT and at K-State). In the first matchup in Lubbock, OU went off for 97 points Four different OU players are averaging in double-figures led by Williams and Robertson. Williams is averaging a team-best 18.5 a game while Robertson is going off for 17.8 a game. OU has shot 1594 total field goals with 630 of those coming from behind the arc. Robertson is just mere percentage points away from averaging 50/40/90 for the season; meaning at least 50 percent from the floor, 40 percent from three and 90 percent from the line. The Kansas native is shooting 48.8 percent from the field, 46.4 percent from three and 95.1 percent from the line (77-81).

UP NEXT:

The Lady Raiders return home for a matchup with Kansas on Saturday. Tip-off for Tech’s annual pink game is set for 2 p.m. from United Supermarkets Arena. All fans are encouraged to wear pink in support of those who are battling and have survived breast cancer, as the Lady Raiders will be wearing special warmup shirts and special pink uniforms.

 



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Eastboune rubbish tip ‘may be forced to close’ by Storm Eunice


The Met Office has issued an amber weather warning starting at 5am tomorrow (Friday February 18), stating there is a ‘good chance’ that flying debris could result in loss of life.

At the peak of the storm in early afternoon, gusts are forecast to rise to in excess of 70mph in inland areas and up to 80mph in coastal locations, before receding by evening.

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Storm Eunice: Eastbourne battens down the hatches to prepare for Friday

The Met Office also suggested that residents should expect damage to buildings and homes, roads and railway lines to close and cancellations to bus, train, ferry services and flights.

East Sussex County Council has said that strong winds ‘could mean that our Household Waste Recycling Sites may be forced to close on Friday 18 February’.

It runs rubbish tips in Eastbourne, Crowborough, Hailsham, Hastings, Lewes, Maresfield near Uckfield, Mountfield near Battle, Newhaven, Seaford and Uckfield,

The council has also urged residents not to travel unless necessary and ensure you have a phone charged in case of power cuts.

Household Waste Recycling Site, St. Philips Avenue Eastbourne. march 18th 2014 E11180Q SUS-140319-130900001



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Lady Raiders close out two-game road swing at OU


NORMAN, Okla. – The Texas Tech Lady Raiders close out a two-game road swing Wednesday night when they travel to Norman to face the No. 15 Oklahoma Sooners.

Tech and OU are meeting for the first time since Jan. 2, the Lady Raiders opening game of Big 12 conference play.

INSIDE THE MATCHUP:

MATCHUP:
Texas Tech (9-14, 2-10 Big 12) at No. 15 Oklahoma (20-4, 9-3 Big 12)

LOCATION: Norman, Okla.

DATE: February 15, 2022

TIME: 6 p.m.

LAST TIME OUT:

Despite another 20 point performance from Vivian Gray and a double-double from Taylah Thomas, the Texas Tech Lady Raiders fell 62-58 to Oklahoma State Cowgirls Saturday night. With her 20-point performance Gray moved to within 28 points of reaching the 2,000-point mark at the D-I level. Gray has scored almost 2,400 points when you include her D-II numbers at Fort Collins. Thomas had 14 points and 10 rebounds for her seventh double-double of the season. OSU held a large advantage at the charity stripe, outscoring Tech 21-9. The Lady Raiders were just 9-of-14 from the line, while OSU made its first 18 FTs before shooting 21-of-27 from the line. The 10 rebound performance was Thomas’ second consecutive game with at least 10 boards.

SCOUTING THE SOONERS:

Oklahoma enters Wednesday’s matchup ranked No. 15 in both this week’s AP poll and the coach’s poll. The Sooners are 20-4 overall and 9-3 in Big 12 play. Led by a pair of seniors in Taylor Robertson and Madi Williams, the Sooners are averaging an impressive 85.3 points a game this season, the second most in D-I. OU is coming off its worst offensive performance of the season last Saturday against UT, where they scored just 63 points, the lowest they have scored all season. In fact, OU has been held below 70 points just three times all season (vs. UT, at UT and at K-State). In the first matchup in Lubbock, OU went off for 97 points Four different OU players are averaging in double-figures led by Williams and Robertson. Williams is averaging a team-best 18.5 a game while Robertson is going off for 17.8 a game. OU has shot 1594 total field goals with 630 of those coming from behind the arc. Robertson is just mere percentage points away from averaging 50/40/90 for the season; meaning at least 50 percent from the floor, 40 percent from three and 90 percent from the line. The Kansas native is shooting 48.8 percent from the field, 46.4 percent from three and 95.1 percent from the line (77-81).

UP NEXT:

The Lady Raiders return home for a matchup with Kansas on Saturday. Tip-off for Tech’s annual pink game is set for 2 p.m. from United Supermarkets Arena. All fans are encouraged to wear pink in support of those who are battling and have survived breast cancer, as the Lady Raiders will be wearing special warmup shirts and special pink uniforms.

 



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Ottawa close to removing pre-arrival COVID-19 test for fully vaccinated Canadian travellers: sources


The federal government is close to removing mandatory PCR testing for fully vaccinated Canadians who travel outside Canada, sources tell CBC News.

Currently any person who travels outside the country must provide proof of a negative molecular test (such as a PCR test) prior to returning home. The test must be taken within 72 hours of scheduled departure on a flight or arrival at a land border.

At a news conference on Friday, Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos hinted at revisions coming to Canada’s travel rules. “Our government is actively reviewing the measures in place at our borders, and we should be able to communicate changes on this next week,” he said.

Infectious disease specialists Dr. Dominik Mertz, centre, and Dr. Zain Chagla, right, attended a news conference Thursday calling on the federal government to drop all testing requirements for fully vaccinated travellers. (YouTube/Canadian Travel and Tourism Roundtable)

The news comes one day after two infectious diseases physicians joined forces with the travel industry to call for an end to Canada’s pre- and post-arrival testing requirements for fully vaccinated travellers.

At a news conference held at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport on Thursday, Dr. Dominik Mertz and Dr. Zain Chagla — along with the Tourism Industry Association of Canada — argued that testing travellers is pointless, because Omicron has already spread across the country.

“The risk for the average traveller coming in is in the same ballpark as if you were testing a random person in downtown Toronto. It’s not going to make a difference,” said Mertz, an infectious diseases specialist with McMaster University in Hamilton.

High cost of travel rules

Travellers entering Canada must pay for their pre-arrival molecular test, which can cost upward of $100.

The government is also spending millions of dollars to randomly test thousands of vaccinated travellers daily upon arrival.

At the news conference, Chagla argued the money spent on tests by both the government and individuals is a wasted expense.

“There is something to be said about the cost here, both for the individuals but [also] for the public for testing that may not … be preventing a lot of people from spreading COVID-19 locally,” said Chagla, an associate professor at McMaster University.

WATCH | There are better ways to look for Omicron than testing travellers, specialist says:

Better ways to look for Omicron than testing travellers, says specialist

Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Zain Chagla makes a case for why Canada’s COVID-19 testing requirements for travellers need to change. 1:44

Jeannette Smith, of Porters Lake, N.S., feels the $300 US she spent on two PCR tests to return to Canada was a waste of money. Smith and her husband drove to Fairfax, Va., in December to visit their daughter.

The couple paid for expedited PCR tests in Fairfax. The results were supposed to arrive within two days, but, due to high demand, they didn’t arrive in time.

Smith said the couple decided to cross the border anyway, because a snowstorm was coming and they feared it would lead to highway closures.

Steve and Jeannette Smith of Porters Lake, N.S., paid $300 US for two PCR tests to return to Canada, but didn’t get the results in time when crossing the border. (Submitted by Jeannette Smith)

They didn’t get fined, she said, but a Health Canada official at the border noted on their files that they entered the country without a test.

“We’re really concerned about when we cross the next time,” said Smith. “Here we are, doing everything that we’re supposed to do, following all the rules to the letter, and it still didn’t work out.”

Smith and her husband finally did get their negative test results — after they arrived home. She said she supports Canada’s COVID-19 measures, but believes the time has come to relax the rules for fully vaccinated travellers.

“We’re getting to the point with the pandemic that more and more people are vaccinated and [we should] allow a little more freedom for those people.”

Positivity rate climbs

During Friday’s news conference, Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam noted that the positivity rate for travellers tested upon arrival has climbed over the past couple of months due to the highly infectious Omicron variant. 

Between Sept. 10 and Nov. 27, just 0.16 per cent of randomly selected fully vaccinated travellers tested positive upon arrival. But that number jumped to 5.16 per cent between Nov. 28 and Jan. 22, according to the latest data

“Each one of these individuals can potentially transmit to others,” said Tam.

WATCH | Pandemic travel restrictions are under review, public health officials say:

Public health officials say pandemic travel restrictions are under review, announcement coming soon

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam says officials are reviewing PCR testing requirements for travellers returning to Canada and will update travel restrictions in the coming weeks. 2:08

Even so, she said, it’s time to review Canada’s border measures.

“We do have to adapt our border stance, because we know it’s pretty impossible to reduce every single case of importation. It’s already in Canada and it’s transmitted widely throughout our communities.”

Other health experts generally agree, but with caveats

CBC News asked 10 other medical professionals their opinions on dropping testing requirements for travellers. In general, they supported nixing the current testing rules for fully vaccinated travellers, but some listed caveats.

Several recommended that travellers take a pre-arrival antigen test instead of a molecular test. Although PCR tests can be more accurate, antigen tests are much cheaper and can provide results within minutes.

“The other passengers and the people who are working on that flight should not have to be on a flight with someone who is positive,” said Tara Moriarty, an infectious disease researcher and associate professor at the University of Toronto.

“Rapid tests are probably a better way to go and then that’s also something that can be done at the airport.”

WATCH | Some Canadians reconsidering international travel over March break:

Canadians weigh travel concerns ahead of March break

A continued advisory against non-essential travel and COVID-19 testing requirements have some Canadians reconsidering international travel over March break and some experts questioning the value of the restrictions. 1:48

Dr. Prabhat Jha, an epidemiologist at St. Michael’s hospital in Toronto, also recommended switching to antigen tests, and suggested the government change the definition of ‘fully vaccinated’ to those who have also had their booster shot.

Montreal epidemiologist and cardiologist Dr. Christopher Labos cautioned that if Canada dropped all test requirements, it would need to have a solid plan in place to quickly redeploy them if necessary.

When it comes to arrival testing, Moriarty said she would like the government to still do surveillance testing of some travellers, but without requiring them to quarantine while they wait for their test results.

“All the resources that are put into this would be far better deployed into surveillance … so that we have some eyes on what might be coming in terms of variants.”



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Travel news: Turkmenistan wants to close the ‘Gates of Hell’


Editor’s Note — Sign up for Unlocking the World, CNN Travel’s weekly newsletter. Get news about destinations opening and closing, inspiration for future adventures, plus the latest in aviation, food and drink, where to stay and other travel developments.

(CNN) — This week in travel, the United States declared Canada a “very high” risk destination, the world’s most powerful passports for 2022 were revealed and Turkmenistan’s president called for the country’s “Gates of Hell” to close.

Canada deemed ‘very high’ risk

Say it ain’t so! After very low Covid numbers throughout the pandemic, the world’s second-largest country in terms of total area has recently seen a very steep rise in cases.

Spirit Island in Canada's Jasper National Park.

Spirit Island in Canada’s Jasper National Park.

Jeff Penner/Adobe Stock

Passport envy

Travelers have never had it so good.

No, seriously. Pandemic restrictions aside, passport holders worldwide now enjoy visa-free entry to 107 countries, on average — nearly twice as many as in 2006.

Problem is, there’s no such thing as an average passport. A new report says two Asian nations hold the title of world’s most powerful passports in 2022, and the gap between the highest-ranking countries and those at the bottom has never been wider.
Then there are those extra-special VIP passports — diplomatic, investigative, even presidential — with rights the rest of us can only dream about. Here’s our explainer on the passports that open all doors.

The world’s shortest flight

In Scotland’s Orkney Islands, there’s a regular scheduled flight that takes less time than it does to take off your belt and shoes for the airport security tray.

Loganair flight LM711, between the islands of Westray and Papa Westray, covers a 1.7-mile route and takes just 53 seconds on a good day. Here’s what it’s like on the world’s shortest passenger flight.
And if you’re interested in economizing in the world of aviation, check out our story on why commercial airliners might soon be flying with just one pilot.

2021: Year of the Unruly Airline Passenger

Assaults on crew members. Public intoxication. Verbal abuse. 2021 was the worst on record for unruly passenger behavior on US planes, according to data from the Federal Aviation Administration.

And this year’s not looking much better — already American Airlines is saying a man’s been apprehended after damaging a plane during the boarding process.

‘Gates of Hell’ may soon shut

Turkmenistan’s Darvaza gas crater is celebrated around the world as the closest thing on Earth to an honest-to-goodness portal to the Underworld.

The crater was formed in the early 1970s, when the ground collapsed during a Soviet gas drilling expedition, and it’s been burning off natural gas ever since.

In the world of international tourist attractions, if the Darvaza Crater is Hell, London’s much-mocked Marble Arch Mound is a sort of underwhelming Purgatory. The $8 million lumpy hillock closed January 9, just six months after opening.

Precious family letters arrive home

A family’s irreplaceable collection of letters from the 1940s to 1970s were accidentally left on a Southwest Airlines flight to Chicago. Against all the odds, they were reunited with their owner.

In case you missed it

The Soviet Union built one of the world’s most incredible flying machines.

This “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” Tokyo podcast might help get you in the mood.

Is there anything more curvaceously carbalicious than the humble potato?



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