COP26 draft deal calls on countries to boost emissions cuts by end of 2022. Here’s what else is in it


Typically draft COP agreements are watered down in the final text, but there is also a chance that some elements could be strengthened, depending on how wrangling between countries pans out.

The document “recognizes that the impacts of climate change will be much lower at the temperature increase of 1.5 °C compared to 2 °C and resolves to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C.”

Scientists say the world must limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels in order to avoid the climate crisis worsening and approaching a catastrophic scenario.

A key analysis published on Tuesday said the world is on track for 2.4 degrees of warming. That would mean the risks of extreme droughts, wildfires, floods, catastrophic sea level rise and food shortages would increase dramatically, scientists say.
Key takeaways from Tuesday at COP26: On track for 2.4 degrees of warming, and is America really 'back?'

The British COP26 presidency’s overarching goal was “to keep 1.5 alive,” so this firmed-up language is what it and other climate-leading nations were hoping for.

Several countries, including Saudi Arabia, Russia, China, Brazil and Australia, have shown resistance to this change at various meetings over the past six months in the lead-up to COP26.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson spoke with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on Wednesday in which they “discussed the importance of making progress in negotiations in the final days of COP26,” a Downing Street readout of the call showed.

“The Prime Minister said all countries needed to come to the table with increased ambition if we are to keep the target of limiting global warming to 1.5C alive.”

The draft also recognized that achieving this shift means “meaningful and effective action” by all countries and territories in what it calls a “critical decade.”

It “recognizes that limiting global warming to 1.5 °C by 2100 requires rapid, deep and sustained reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, including reducing global carbon dioxide emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 relative to the 2010 level and to net zero around mid-century,” using language that is in line with the latest UN climate science report.

Net zero is a state where the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere are no greater than those removed, whether through natural means like planting more trees to absorb carbon dioxide or capturing gases with technology.

“It is important that this agreement recognizes the importance of the 1.5 degree goal,” as well as the science that shows deep emissions cuts are needed over this decade, said William Collins, professor of meteorology at the University of Reading.

But he added: “The current pledges in Glasgow are not even close to meeting these cuts by 2030. If countries do not start straight away on a path towards these 2030 emission levels it will be too late to update them in 2025,” he said, referring to the next time countries are obliged to revise their targets.

“The hope was that this level of ambition could have been achieved in Glasgow; if not, countries will need to be brought back to negotiations again next year.”

On countries’ emissions plans

To limit global warming to 1.5 degrees, every country needs to have a plan that aligns with that goal.

The most notable line in the draft is one that urges signatories to come forward by the end of 2022 with new targets for slashing emissions over the next decade, which scientists say is crucial if the world wants to have any chance of keeping warming below 2 degrees and closer to 1.5.

World is on track for 2.4 degrees of warming despite COP26 pledges, analysis finds

David Waskow, director of the International Climate Initiative with the World Resources Institute, welcomed the 2022 target as progress.

“So this is crucial language because it does set the time frame around when countries need to come forward with strengthened targets in order to align with Paris,” he said, referring the 2015 Paris Agreement, which set a global warming limit of 2 degrees, with a preference for 1.5.

Although that was agreed six years ago, many parties’ emissions plans do not align with that goal.

He warned that there were “certainly parties who have been pushing back on that,” naming Saudi Arabia and Russia as nations against new commitments by the end of 2022. CNN had reached out to those countries on the same issue on Tuesday and is seeking new comment.

Some experts like Waskow are welcoming this progress, as it requires countries to make new plans before 2025.

But after the UN’s climate science report in August showed climate change was happening faster than previously thought, some countries and groups had hoped for a rise in ambition more quickly.

“This draft deal is not a plan to solve the climate crisis, it’s an agreement that we’ll all cross our fingers and hope for the best,” Greenpeace International executive director Jennifer Morgan said in a statement, pointing to a recent study by Climate Action Tracker that shows the world is heading for 2.4 degrees of warming, even with the new pledges made ahead of COP26.

“The job of this conference was always to get that number down to 1.5C, but with this text world leaders are punting it to next year. If this is the best they can come up with then it’s no wonder kids today are furious at them.”

WRI’s director of climate negotiations, Yamide Dagnet, said it was climate-vulnerable countries that pushed for the stronger language on 1.5, but said what they wanted was for the agreement to set stronger obligations for particular nations. They are also seeing the 2022 goal as difficult for them to achieve without a bigger boost in funding.

“For them, it’s going to be very difficult … to come back home and to say, after all of your efforts … you have to do another adjustment effort within a year,” she said.

On fossil fuels

The draft agreement asks governments to “accelerate the phasing-out of coal and subsidies for fossil fuels.” This seems obvious as phasing out fossil fuels is necessary if greenhouse gas emissions are to decline. But the inclusion of specific language on this is a big step forward, since previous agreements haven’t mentioned coal and fossil fuel subsidies specifically.

The language is likely to be opposed by major fossil fuel-producing nations.

Humanity needs to ditch coal to save itself. It also needs to keep the lights on.

There are a couple of caveats though on phasing out coal and ending fossil fuel subsidies.

“It doesn’t give a date for either of these and for both it just says ‘accelerating the efforts’ to do so,” WRI President for Climate and Economics Helen Mountford said in a briefing.

COP26 chief Sharma had said before coming to Glasgow that a firm exit date on coal was one of his priorities.

There are also questions being raised over whether the clause on fossil fuels can even survive the next two days of negotiations.

“It does mention fossil fuels and everybody saying that’s amazing, but it doesn’t say that the world has to actually phase out coal as soon as possible, and then decarbonize by removing both natural gas and oil,” Mark Maslin, climate scientist at University College London told CNN.

So the problem here is that suddenly we have a statement that acknowledges that fossil fuels are the issue, but doesn’t actually say in a strong terms that this is what we have to get rid of … and this is the actions of countries like Saudi Arabia, Russia and Australia, who are basically sort of agitating from the background to make it weak,” he added.

There has been some progress on fossil fuels in Glasgow. Twenty-eight countries so far have signed on to an agreement to end the financing of unabated fossil fuel projects abroad by 2022. Unabated projects would be those that do not capture greenhouse gas emissions at the source before they escape to the atmosphere, which is a good start.

Dozens of new countries signed up to phase out coal at COP26, but the end date was the 2030s for developed nations and 2040s for developing countries — a decade later than Sharma and climate leaders had hoped for. The world’s three biggest emitters, China, India and the US, did not sign up. They are also the biggest coal users.

On who should pay what

The draft makes some strong points in a long section on the need to deliver on the promise made by the world’s richest countries more than a decade ago to provide $100 billion a year in climate financing to the developing world. That target was supposed to be met in 2020 but has been missed. It is supposed to go to helping developing countries reduce their emissions but also so they can adapt to the impacts of the crisis.

While countries wrangle over who should pay for the climate crisis, a community on Lagos Island is being swallowed by the sea

The developed world is historically responsible for far more emissions than the developing world, but many of the countries on the front line of the crisis have made little historical contribution to climate change. There is an understanding that the rich world needs to pay for some of the energy transition and adaptation.

“[The conference] notes with serious concern that the current provision of climate finance for adaptation is insufficient to respond to worsening climate change impacts in developing [countries],” the draft says, using fairly strong terms.

But it makes no movement on when the $100 billion should be delivered, pointing to 2023, which is three years past the deadline and currently what it is on track for. US climate envoy John Kerry and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen were hoping for a 2022 date last week.

However, the draft does not give any specific details, reflecting the fact that the US, the European Union and other big players have been pushing against the idea.

“It is fuzzy and vague. The missed deadline for the $100 billion promise doesn’t get acknowledged — and this is a key ask from vulnerable countries,” said Mohamed Adow, director of the climate think tank Power Shift Africa.

But for the first time, the draft agreement also includes more specific language on “loss and damage” financing for the developing world, which is essentially financial liability for climate crisis impacts. Some of the countries most affected by the crisis are asking for more money to deal with the loss and damage they are already experiencing because of global warming, which is essentially the idea behind climate reparations.



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COP26: World leaders commit to supporting sustainable aviation


World leaders and representatives from 18 nations attending the
UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) have participated in the inaugural meeting
of the International Aviation Climate Ambition Coalition, during which they signed
a declaration committing to supporting the aviation industry in achieving its
emissions reduction goals.

Representatives agreed to work together through the
International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) to advance actions to reduce
CO2 emissions from aviation, including the deployment of sustainable aviation
fuel (SAF) and the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International
Aviation (CORSIA).

The agreement includes supporting the ICAO’s efforts to
expand participation in CORSIA, with those states not already signed up for the
initiative committing to doing so “as soon as possible”.

On SAF, the coalition agreed to promote the development and
deployment of fuels that can reduce the lifecycle emissions of aviation and
contribute to the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, in
particular avoiding competition with food production for land use and water
supply.

In addition, leaders committed to promoting the development
of new low and zero-carbon aircraft technologies.

The coalition acknowledged the impact of Covid-19 on the
aviation sector and the need for government-backed initiatives that can help
the industry build back and grow in a more sustainable manner. Representatives
agreed cooperation between states and aviation stakeholders is critical for
helping to reduce the sector’s contribution to climate change.



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This climate activist from Colombia believes events like COP26 can bring change : Goats and Soda – NPR



This climate activist from Colombia believes events like COP26 can bring change : Goats and Soda  NPR



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COP26 in Glasgow shines light on Britain’s sustainable travel experiences


Ahead of COP26, VisitBritain has launched a global sustainable tourism content ‘hub’ for visitors with itineraries, activities and experiences to enjoy a sustainable stay in Britain.

VisitBritain Executive Vice President, The Americas Gavin Landry said:

“The COP26 Summit and accompanying media exposure gives us a timely and valuable opportunity to highlight how visitors can enjoy a sustainable and responsible stay in Britain, from eco-friendly accommodation to dark sky reserves, sustainable fashion and locally sourced food and drink to epic train journeys and cycling routes.

“Many businesses and organizations in our sector are already putting sustainability at the heart of what they do and we want to support visitors and our global travel trade partners to find products and experiences that will enrich their stay. We hope people will then stay longer, travel more widely using low-carbon transport and explore out of season.”

Follow these links for terrific ideas on exploring Britain sustainably:

VisitBritain has set out its priorities to aid the recovery of both domestic and international tourism, including rebuilding a more resilient, sustainable and accessible industry supporting the UK Government’s ambitions set out in the Tourism Recovery Plan. Its recently published Sustainable Tourism discussion paper sets out its approach, from championing regional dispersal and low carbon transport, sharing resources and best practice with businesses to working with the trade on itineraries that support sustainable and responsible tourism. 

COP26 is the next in a series of major events to be held in Britain. Next year, significant global tourism draws will include HM The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee and ‘UNBOXED: Creativity in the UK’ 2022 – promoting the UK’s creativity and innovation to the world.

Tourism is a critical industry for the UK, usually worth £127 billion annually to the economy. VisitBritain continues to work with the industry to spread the economic and social benefits of tourism more widely, driving visits right across the year and across the nations and regions, supporting local economies.

Press contacts:

  • Julia Gordin, VisitBritain Senior Communications Manager, USA
    M: 347.598.4046; E: [email protected]
  • Erica Roney, VisitBritain Communications Manager, USA
    M: 646.988.9105; E: [email protected]

SOURCE VisitBritain



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COP26: Boris Johnson to travel to UN and White House to push for climate action ahead of crunch summit | Climate News


Prime Minister Boris Johnson will visit President Joe Biden next week in a bid to drum up support ahead of the COP26 Summit on climate change.

Mr Johnson will travel to New York for a meeting at the UN on Monday, before travelling to Washington to meet Mr Biden at the White House for the first time for discussions on climate, COVID and international security.

It is hoped the meetings will help galvanise momentum in the lead up to COP26 – crunch climate talks the UK is hosting in Glasgow in November.

Speaking ahead of the visit, the prime minister said: “World leaders have a small window of time left to deliver on their climate commitments ahead of COP26.

“My message to those I meet this week will be clear: future generations will judge us based on what we achieve in the coming months.”

U.S. President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden are greeted by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson before posing for photos at the G-7 summit, in Carbis Bay, Britain, June 11, 2021. Patrick Semansky/Pool via REUTERS
Image:
Mr Johnson and Mr Biden made a series of climate promises when they met at the G7 in Cornwall in June

While in New York Mr Johnson will make a speech at the UN General Assembly and meet a group of world leaders to discuss actions that can be taken to help mitigate the impact of global warming on developing countries.

Around 100 world leaders are confirmed to attend COP26, which represent a once in a generation opportunity to make progress to keep global warming below 1.5C.

The prime minister’s trip to Washington is his first since Mr Biden took office.

He will also meet Vice President Kamala Harris and senior members of the US House of Representatives and Senate.

These discussions will be an important opportunity to build on the climate commitments made by leaders, including the Mr Johnson and Mr Biden, at the G7 Summit in Cornwall.

At the meeting in June, the G7 agreed to take action to tackle climate change and drive green growth around the world, including by mobilising $100 billion in climate finance and phasing out the use of coal internationally.

They will also discuss the situation in Afghanistan and how to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe in the region.

At a virtual meeting of G7 leaders, Mr Johnson, President Biden and other leaders agreed to work together on a collective international response.

This work will be bolstered by the UN Security Council Resolution, driven by the UK, US and France, which calls for urgent humanitarian access to Afghanistan.

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The UK has committed £286m in aid to Afghanistan this year.

Earlier this week the UK, US and Australia announced the formation of a new defence pact – AUKUS – to promote stability and security in the Indo-Pacific region.

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The show investigates how global warming is changing our landscape and highlights solutions to the crisis.



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