Robbie Ray Doesn’t Travel With Mariners to Toronto Series | Sports News


By IAN HARRISON, Associated Press

TORONTO (AP) — Mariners left-hander Robbie Ray isn’t joining Seattle for a series in Toronto this week, missing a chance to celebrate the Cy Young Award he won with the Blue Jays last season amid border restrictions related to the COVID-19 vaccine.

Ray pitched against the Mets in New York on Sunday, then remained in the U.S. while teammates traveled to Canada for Monday’s series opener.

There was no locker for Ray in the Mariners’ clubhouse in Toronto. Manager Scott Servais said Ray will rejoin the team in Boston on Thursday for a four-game series against the Red Sox. He did not elaborate on the left-hander’s absence.

To enter the country, the Canadian government requires a person to have received a second COVID-19 vaccine dose — or one dose of Johnson & Johnson — at least 14 days before entry.

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Players who go on the restricted list because they are not vaccinated against COVID-19 are not paid and do not accrue major league service time, according to a March agreement between Major League Baseball and the players’ association.

The agreement also stipulates that a pitcher who has pitched at least four consecutive innings in a game cannot be replaced on the active roster unless three days have elapsed.

The Mariners took advantage of a May 12 day off to alter their rotation so that Ray started Sunday in New York, where he allowed five runs in six innings, improving to 4-3.

Ray went 13-7 with a 2.84 ERA and a career-high 248 strikeouts in 32 starts for Toronto last season, when professional athletes were exempt from COVID-19 border regulations.

Ray then signed a $115 million contract, five-year contract with Seattle in November. He would have lost $346,154 had he been placed on the restricted list for being ineligible to accompany the team to Canada. Border exemptions for athletes ended in January.

The Mariners did put Drew Steckenrider on the restricted list Monday, a move that could cost the right-hander $51,099 of his $3.1 million salary. Steckenrider is 0-1 with two saves and a 4.85 ERA in 14 relief appearances. The series is Seattle’s only regular-season visit to Toronto.

Seattle selected the contract of left-hander Roenis Elías from Triple-A Tacoma. He had joined the Mariners at Citi Field on Sunday in anticipation of being added to the active big league roster.

Elías signed a minor league contract with the Mariners on April 1. He previously pitched for Seattle in 2014 and ’15, and again in 2018 and ’19. He also has pitched for Boston and Washington.

Elías, 33, last pitched in the majors with the Nationals in 2019. He had a 4.30 ERA in one start and 10 relief appearances at Triple-A Tacoma, striking out 11 and walking four in 14 2/3 innings.

More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.





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Tripologist travel tips: Portugal doesn’t recognise Australian vaccine certificates


I’m a triple-vaccinated researcher hoping to attend a conference in Portugal in July. Since Portugal doesn’t recognise Australian vaccination certificates might I be turned around or quarantined? When will Portugal recognise Australia’s vaccine certificates, when will we be allowed to join the EU Digital COVID Certificate system and when will Portugal reopen to Australian travellers? A Dennis, Fortitude Valley QLD

Compared with other western European countries, Portugal has been slow to allow Australians to enter for leisure travel. Since the advice on the official website is unclear, I requested clarification from the Portuguese Consulate in Sydney. According to written advice from a spokesperson, “Direct travel from Australia is limited to essential purposes only (professional, study, family reunion and for health or humanitarian reasons), to be officially extended to all visitors shortly for non-essential travel. There is an ongoing process for the Australian COVID-19 vaccination certificates to be duly recognised in Portugal. You need a PCR test 72 hours before boarding.” Refer to the Visit Portugal website [visitportugal.com] for updates. The EU Digital COVID Certificate is not available to Australians since Australia’s International COVID Vaccine Certificate uses a different format from that approved by the European Commission.

My husband and I have six days in between family engagements in the UK in December. We will be in Cookham and would like to visit Bath and York, can we do both by train? We need to be in Birmingham on December 22. B. Corrigan, Mittagong NSW

From Cookham, in Berkshire, Bath is just over 90 minutes away by frequent train services. Bath to York is just over four hours and York to Birmingham is 2½ hours.

Unless York is an absolute must, I’d be inclined to spend the whole six nights in Bath and use this World Heritage-listed city as a base for exploring one of the loveliest parts of England. Right on your doorstep you’ve got Glastonbury, Stratford-upon-Avon and Wells Cathedral, a Gothic beauty and major pilgrimage site since medieval times. Just to the north are the storybook villages of The Cotswolds – Moreton-in-March, Bourton-on-the-Water and Stow-on-the-Wold – bordered to the west by the lovely and gracious city of Cheltenham. That’s more than enough for the time you have available, and Bath to Birmingham is less than two hours by train.

The Department of Health no longer requires a negative pre-departure test for travellers entering Australia. However the Department of Home Affairs requires us to complete a Digital Passenger Declaration that confirms our passport and vaccination certificate, but the government has that information. So why is the DPD required for Australian travellers? B. Nolan, Cremorne NSW

True that government departments have passport and vaccination information for Australians living in Australia but there’s more to it. For example those departments would have no vaccination record for Australians who live overseas and who may or may not have been vaccinated there. It is necessary to show evidence of a DPD when you check in for your flight to return to Australia but if check-in staff had to separate Australians domiciled overseas from those who are genuine residents, it gets complicated. Also, the DPD asks incoming passengers to identify which countries they have visited in the 14 days prior to arrival to determine whether they have been in an infection hotspot. It would not be in the national interest to allow Australians only to avoid that admission, therefore all must complete that DPD.

In October 2023 my wife and I are celebrating her birthday with our children and partners in the Dordogne. We’re looking at booking accommodation around Sarlat, thinking 8-10 adults. Any advice re accommodation, car hire and travel from Paris to Sarlat? E. Beck, Surrey Hills VIC

Take a look at Oliver’s Travels [oliverstravels.com], which specialises in upmarket European villas. Searching the Sarlat region I’m seeing half a dozen properties that would suit your group and I think you’d be perfectly happy with something like Le Prieure Esperance. However the Chateau de Cardou just a little to the west near Bergerac could be a contender if you need more room, and you don’t have to worry about the neighbours on the 150 hectare estate,

For car hire, try Rentalcars.com [rentalcars.com], they always seem to track down a better deal than I can, even as a loyal customer. What you might do is take a train from Paris to Bordeaux and pick up a hire car from there. The fastest trains from Paris Montparnasse take just over two hours. Limoges (3 hours 20 by train) is closer to your destination, but the choice of car-hire operators is smaller.

Got a travel question? Include your name and suburb or town and send it to Michael Gebicki – tripologist@traveller.com.au

Travel advice is general; readers should consider their personal circumstances.





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Mavs’ full playoff schedule vs. Jazz doesn’t do Luka Doncic many favors with calf injury recovery


The full schedule for the Mavericks’ first-round playoff series against the Jazz is out.

And it doesn’t do Luka Doncic many favors while rehabbing the left calf strain that’s a threat to keep him from playing from the start.

Here’s the slate, which the NBA announced in the early hours Wednesday morning:

  • Game 1 in Dallas at noon Saturday, April 16, on ESPN
  • Game 2 in Dallas at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 18, on NBATV
  • Game 3 in Utah at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 21, on NBATV
  • Game 4 in Utah at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23, on TNT

And as necessary:

  • Game 5 in Dallas, Time and TV TBD, Monday, April 25
  • Game 6 in Utah, Time and TV TBD, Thursday, April 28
  • Game 7 in Dallas, Time TBD, Saturday, April 30, on TNT

After practice Wednesday, the Mavericks didn’t have any more clarity on Doncic’s rehab progress.

“Same as yesterday,” Kidd said, still a left calf strain that’s receiving 24-7 treatment.

His status for Game 1 remains in question, but if Doncic is healthy enough to play early in the series, he won’t have much time to recover and receive treatment between outings.

Game 2 could’ve come as late as Tuesday night in Dallas, which would’ve provided the medical staff an additional three days after Game 1′s early tip to treat Doncic.

That would’ve also marked nine days out from when the 23-year-old superstar suffered the strain in the regular-season finale. The Mavericks haven’t revealed the grade of Doncic’s strain, but injury experts interviewed by The Dallas Morning News said minor, Grade 1 strains typically heal in seven to 10 days.

The experts also said the time commitment and inconvenience of travel can hinder a plan for round-the-clock treatment. The NBA built in a typical travel day between Games 2 and 3, but not between Games 4 and 5, when the series will move back to Dallas if neither team sweeps.

Most series across the league will complete the first round games in a Saturday-to-Saturday or Sunday-to-Sunday week cycle, depending on the Game 1 tip.

But not all.

The Brooklyn Nets and Boston Celtics, for example, will likely tip off their Game 3 on April 23 (TBD time) after the Mavericks and the Jazz have started — or completed — their Game 4 that afternoon.

If Doncic or the Mavericks were miffed with the timing, they didn’t show it Wednesday.

During the portion of practice open to the media, all players except Doncic and forward Maxi Kleber (right ankle soreness) split into four groups and competed in a series of 3-point shooting drills.

Plenty of hollering and playful trash-talking ensued.

As they moved on to individual shooting work, Doncic emerged from the locker room area and got on a stationary exercise bike. He pedaled with a blue wrap around his left calf while director of athletic performance Jeremy Holsopple and manual therapist Casey Spangler looked on.

“He’s staying positive,” Dorian Finney-Smith said of Doncic. “He’s definitely involved still, so [he’s] helping us, you know, with schemes and offense, what he sees. He’s still walking around with that smile on his face, so you’d never really know what’s going on.”



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Biden ‘doesn’t currently have any plans’ to travel to Ukraine despite Boris Johnson visit, WH says


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

National security adviser Jake Sullivan said Sunday that President Biden has no plans to visit Ukraine, despite a recent visit to the country from U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

“It was quite the symbol to see Prime Minister Boris Johnson walking the streets of Kyiv with President Zelenskyy,” NBC host Chuck Todd told Sullivan. “It raises the question: are we going see President Biden in Kyiv?”

“President Biden doesn’t currently have any plans to travel to Kyiv,” Sullivan replied. “But I will tell you he sits in the Oval Office and in the Situation Room on a daily basis, organizing and coordinating the world when it comes to the delivery of weapons,” Sullivan continued.

In this image provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, left, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson talk during their walk in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 9, 2022.

In this image provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, left, and Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson talk during their walk in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 9, 2022.
(Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP)

Sullivan went on to say that the Ukrainian foreign minister said the United States “is at the center of the effort to deliver from other countries and organizing and coordinating the world to take actions like the one last week to kick Russia out of the Human Rights Council.”

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Kyiv on Saturday, March 9, 2022.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Kyiv on Saturday, March 9, 2022.
(Credit: Office of the President of Ukraine)

“So President Biden will stay focused on that and make sure that he is showing his support and solidarity to the Ukrainian people through those kinds of decisive actions,” Sullivan added.

WH SAYS THEY KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT IN UKRAINE BASED ON PUTIN’S CHOICE OF NEW GENERAL

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy were widely praised on social media for their show of solidarity in the face of Russian aggression. 

A video of Johnson, shared by Ukraine’s Ministry of Defense, shows him and Zelenskyy defiantly walking down the streets of Kyiv, speaking with locals.

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“This is what democracy looks like,” tweeted the Defense Ministry. “This is what courage looks like. This what true friendship between peoples and between nations looks like.” 



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‘The Tourist’ Thrills, but Doesn’t Take Itself Too Seriously


LONDON — After his car is rammed off the road by a mystery driver in a truck, a Northern Irishman wakes up in a hospital in the Australian outback with no memory of who he is. “I keep telling myself to just try and remember,” he tells the police officer that comes to take his statement, “but it’s like trying to make yourself fly.”

Tha is the starting gun for “The Tourist,” a six-part limited series that premieres Thursday on HBO Max. After the man, played by Jamie Dornan (“Belfast”), leaves the hospital, it becomes clear he was involved in some murky business in his former life, and someone definitely wants him dead.

The opening premise would suggest a typical thriller. Memory loss is a familiar plot device for the genre (see: “Memento,” “The Bourne Identity” et al). “The Tourist,” which first aired on the BBC in Britain this year, is similar in form to the broadcaster’s other tense, tight shows, such as “The Night Manager” and “Bodyguard.”

Unlike those offerings, “The Tourist” adds more offbeat humor and touches of the surreal to a gripping central plot that still provides car chases, shootouts and international criminal outfits.

When he first read the script, Dornan found it surprising, he said in a recent interview. “Any time I thought it was one thing, or I had a handle on where it was heading, it was altered,” he said. “It was sometimes really subtle, and sometimes it was a big whack over the head.”

As the episodes unfurl, rooting for the confused, likable character becomes a little more complicated. In a recent interview, Dornan said that when he first read the script he wondered if the audience would still be on the man’s side, “searching for the answers when they find out what some of the answers are.”

Dornan’s character is joined in his hunt for answers by the police officer from the hospital, Helen Chambers (Danielle Macdonald), who is on her first assignment off traffic duty. She feels strangely compelled to help the man, who also finds assistance from Luci Miller (Shalom Brune-Franklin), a waitress he meets at a cafe.

The show’s setting in small-town Australia helps provide comic relief through characters like a hapless but well-meaning rookie police officer and the elderly owners of a bed-and-breakfast. Amid the chaos and danger, there are scenes that tip into the wholesome and heartwarming.

Helen, the police officer, is also an unlikely thriller protagonist: kind, honest and unassuming. Macdonald sees her character as the show’s “Everywoman,” she said in a recent interview. When we first meet Helen, it is clear that she is unhappy and underestimated, by herself and her fiancé.

Macdonald said that she had spent some time figuring out the character’s role in the plot. “The rest of the show is so dark and Helen was so light,” she said. “It ended up balancing really nicely.”

The show’s writers and creators, the brothers Jack and Harry Williams, have become known for conventional thrillers such as the Golden Globe-nominated show “The Missing.” “The Tourist” came from a desire to do something different. “It’s the kind of show we’d watch, it’s the kind of show we really enjoy doing,” Jack said.

The brothers also have experience with dark-hearted television comedies, having been executive producers on Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s “Fleabag” and on Daisy Haggard’s “Back to Life.” Their latest show, then, was about “bridging that gap, because having made comedies and made drama, it just felt like a natural place for us to operate,” Harry Williams said.

They brought on Chris Sweeney, who also worked on “Back to Life,” to direct half of the series. Despite wanting to work on nondirectorial projects at the time, Sweeney said that he had been won over. “I don’t like straight thrillers, it’s not my thing, but I like things that use a device to talk about what is human existence in a playful way,” he said in a video interview.

“The Tourist” questions not only how the past defines us, but also — through the character trajectories of both the central character and of Helen — the other things we lean on to build our identities. Sweeney said that he felt the script had the “personality” of films he loves within the thriller genre, like the work of the Coen brothers. He described elements of the show as a “love letter” to those films, with scenes that evoke “No Country for Old Men” and Steven Soderbergh’s “Out of Sight.”

Dornan was initially a little concerned about the show’s genre medley. While shooting in Australia, “the three of us, Shalom, Danielle and I, we were all in equal parts terrified at different moments because of the comedy and the drama, and how to find the comfortable line there,” he said. “I was a bit like, are people going to know what this is, or where to hang their hat on it?”

In Britain, at least, the concerns seem to have been unfounded. When “The Tourist” arrived on the BBC’s streaming service on New Year’s Day, it was met with glowing reviews and quickly became the platform’s third-most successful drama opening to date.

Jack Williams said he thought that the show had resonated with audiences, in part, because of its escapist quality, adding that it “isn’t trying to reflect back some of the angst and misery that everyone’s been experiencing for a few years.”

As well as diving into a mystery, viewers of “The Tourist” are transported to a stark, almost otherworldly landscape. The show was filmed across several different locations in the sprawling expanse of southern Australia, where you can “point the camera anywhere and it just looks incredible,” Harry Williams noted. “That said, we had to travel quite a lot of hours within the outback in order to get that desired effect,” he added.

The travel contributed to the shoot’s lasting five months, a period of filming that was also stretched by the ambition of the show: The opening car chase sequence was filmed over two weeks. “It was the hardest job I’ve ever done,” Dornan said. “It’s the longest job I’ve ever done.”

With the show’s success in Britain has come discussion about the possibility of a second season. The show was conceived as a self-contained mini-series, similar to the BBC’s other six-part shows. That “less is more” approach contrasts with the sprawling nature of much of American network television; Showtime’s thriller “Homeland,” for example, ran for eight seasons and 96 episodes.

Tommy Bulfin, a BBC drama commissioning editor, said in an email that, while the broadcaster has a “tradition of doing six episode runs,” ultimately the practice of doing shorter productions was down to the subject matter. “I think the key to the success of these shows is that they’re all excellent examples of brilliantly crafted stories,” he said.

The Williams brothers echoed that sentiment. In thinking about the length of “The Tourist,” the story took precedence. “You have to kind of follow that and the natural course that it would take and not try and squeeze out more,” Harry said. The pair wouldn’t rule out the possibility of a second season, but added that they were cautious about doing so.

“There is no perfect length, just like there’s no perfect length for a book,” Harry Williams said. “But there is an appropriate length for a story.”



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Speak up if your vacation rental doesn’t meet expectations


Travelers on vacation know to phone the front desk of their hotel for assistance if towels are missing or a lamp is broken. Yet, when staying in a vacation rental, guests will often suffer in silence when something is not up to snuff, saving their frustration for a scathing review afterward. Our advice is to speak up immediately.

According to Statista, there were 60 million vacation rentals in the United States in 2018, a number that is expected to continue to grow with the increased popularity of sites like Airbnb and Vrbo.

We stay in several vacation rentals a year and the vast majority have been of high quality. However, occasionally we’ll discover that something (like kitchen equipment) is in poor repair or that the hairdryer or towels are missing. In such cases, we recommend that you notify the owner or manager right away and give them a chance to remedy the situation.

Unlike hotels, which have housekeeping and maintenance services onsite, rentals can have a property owner who lives some distance away and uses a third-party cleaner or have a property management company. The owner might not be aware of an issue unless it’s brought to his or her attention by the renter.

In upstate New York last fall, the nonstick pans in our rental were badly scratched, causing the nonstick material to flake into the food. We contacted the owner, who apologized, and showed up later that afternoon with a new set of pots. In another case, the owner lived elsewhere and offered to reimburse us if we bought a new set. That worked fine, too.

During our stay in Bucharest, Romania, last summer, the kitchen faucet broke. Our Airbnb host immediately sent a plumber over. Problem solved.

Both Airbnb and Vrbo state on their websites that renters should contact the owner immediately to resolve any issues. This is far more effective than waiting to leave a negative review after the fact. Often, when we read a negative review of a place on Airbnb, the owner responds with “I wish you had let me know there was a problem.”

The bottom line: You’re paying for a place to be up to snuff; if you see something wrong, say so. Landlords want you to post a positive review and a good one will bend over backward to fix any problems. You’ll end up having a better experience for speaking up.

Philadelphia natives Larissa and Michael Milne have been global nomads since 2011. Follow their journey at ChangesInLongitude.com.



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Fauci says he doesn’t expect more travel restrictions even if Omicron variant proves more contagious and deadly


President Joe Biden announced last week that the US would restrict travel from South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, Mozambique and Malawi in response to the new and potentially more transmissible coronavirus variant first identified by South African scientists. Several other nations have followed suit in restricting travel from southern Africa nations.

Asked by CNN’s Jake Tapper on Monday whether he expects more travel restrictions should Omicron prove to be more contagious and deadly, Fauci, Biden’s chief medical adviser, replied, “I don’t think so, Jake.”

“I think what was done about the restrictions from South Africa and neighboring countries was merely because when the information came out about the molecular makeup of this virus with all of the mutations that were of concern, we felt that we needed to do something right away,” Fauci, the long-time director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Tapper on “The Lead.”

“Hopefully those restrictions are not going to be a very long duration until we get a handle as to what’s going on. But we do not anticipate any further restrictions,” he added.

Fauci also said that the travel restrictions are not going to have much of an impact “in the big picture of whether (the Omicron variant) gets here or not.”

“But … it will provide us maybe a couple of weeks of getting better prepared,” he added.

Fauci said US health officials should know the severity of Covid-19 cases caused by the Omicron variant in about a week or two and that they are getting their information from counterparts in South Africa, whom the officials have been in near constant contact with.

“They have a number of patients that they’re following in the medical facilities, and they assured us that they would know probably in a matter of a week, a week and a half, as to whether or not we’re dealing with something that, for the most part is more severe, equally as severe or less severe. It could be either of them,” Fauci said. “Right now, it does not look like there’s a big signal of a high degree of severity, but it’s too early to tell.”

It’s unclear if Omicron will become the dominant strain in the US, but that’s another reason officials are watching cases in South Africa closely.
Pfizer expected to seek FDA authorization for boosters for those ages 16 and 17

“You know, it’s unfortunate that South Africa has been sort of the epicenter, or at least a recognition of it, but the good news is they are as good as it gets when it comes to scientists and public health people, so they’ll be able to give us some very important information, hopefully within the next week or two,” Fauci said.

In the meantime, he told Tapper, “the unvaccinated need to get vaccinated and those who are eligible to get boosted should get boosted because we know from experience … that even with variants that are not specifically directed at by the vaccine, such as the Delta variant, if you get the level of antibody high enough, the protection spills over to those other variants.”

Earlier Monday, Biden urged American not to panic over the new variant and encouraged those who have not yet gotten a booster but are eligible to do so.

“We have the best vaccine in the world, the best medicines, the best scientists, and we’re learning more every single day. And we’ll fight this variant with scientific and knowledgeable actions and speed — not chaos and confusion,” the President said.



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Fauci says he doesn’t expect more travel restrictions even if Omicron variant proves more contagious and deadly – KION546


By Maegan Vazquez, CNN

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious diseases expert, said Monday that he doesn’t anticipate the United States will implement additional travel restrictions even if the Omicron variant proves worse than previous strains of Covid-19.

President Joe Biden announced last week that the US would restrict travel from South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, Mozambique and Malawi in response to the new and potentially more transmissible coronavirus variant first identified by South African scientists. Several other nations have followed suit in restricting travel from southern Africa nations.

Asked by CNN’s Jake Tapper on Monday whether he expects more travel restrictions should Omicron prove to be more contagious and deadly, Fauci, Biden’s chief medical adviser, replied, “I don’t think so, Jake.”

“I think what was done about the restrictions from South Africa and neighboring countries was merely because when the information came out about the molecular makeup of this virus with all of the mutations that were of concern, we felt that we needed to do something right away,” Fauci, the long-time director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Tapper on “The Lead.”

“Hopefully those restrictions are not going to be a very long duration until we get a handle as to what’s going on. But we do not anticipate any further restrictions,” he added.

Fauci also said that the travel restrictions are not going to have much of an impact “in the big picture of whether (the Omicron variant) gets here or not.”

“But … it will provide us maybe a couple of weeks of getting better prepared,” he added.

Fauci said US health officials should know the severity of Covid-19 cases caused by the Omicron variant in about a week or two and that they are getting their information from counterparts in South Africa, whom the officials have been in near constant contact with.

“They have a number of patients that they’re following in the medical facilities, and they assured us that they would know probably in a matter of a week, a week and a half, as to whether or not we’re dealing with something that, for the most part is more severe, equally as severe or less severe. It could be either of them,” Fauci said. “Right now, it does not look like there’s a big signal of a high degree of severity, but it’s too early to tell.”

It’s unclear if Omicron will become the dominant strain in the US, but that’s another reason officials are watching cases in South Africa closely.

“You know, it’s unfortunate that South Africa has been sort of the epicenter, or at least a recognition of it, but the good news is they are as good as it gets when it comes to scientists and public health people, so they’ll be able to give us some very important information, hopefully within the next week or two,” Fauci said.

In the meantime, he told Tapper, “the unvaccinated need to get vaccinated and those who are eligible to get boosted should get boosted because we know from experience … that even with variants that are not specifically directed at by the vaccine, such as the Delta variant, if you get the level of antibody high enough, the protection spills over to those other variants.”

Earlier Monday, Biden urged American not to panic over the new variant and encouraged those who have not yet gotten a booster but are eligible to do so.

“We have the best vaccine in the world, the best medicines, the best scientists, and we’re learning more every single day. And we’ll fight this variant with scientific and knowledgeable actions and speed — not chaos and confusion,” the President said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.



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It doesn’t take travel to see the world


Charlotte Latvala

Charlotte Latvala

As our world gets closer to normal, and it’s no longer socially acceptable to remain ensconced in one’s house for weeks on end, several facts have been nagging at my mind.

I have a kid in Chicago.

I have a kid in San Francisco.

I have train tickets to New York City this winter, to see some Broadway shows with Kid No. 3.

Travel is in my future.

And that makes me nervous. Not COVID nervous (I’m vaccinated and careful and frankly over it) but travel nervous. Well, maybe a little COVID nervous, come to think of it.

But I’ve never been much of a traveler. I’ve barely been out of the United States. Summer trips to northern Ontario, where my parents grew up. One day trip in the other direction, to Tijuana, as a teenager visiting southern California relatives. One short visit to the Bahamas as an adult, many years ago.

I haven’t been to Europe, South America, Asia, Africa or Australia.

In theory, I’d like to go to all those places. I’d love to see Finland, home of my ancestors, and experience the Northern Lights up close. I long to see the pampas in Argentina. I’d give just about anything to walk over the dales of Yorkshire.

But.

I probably won’t. At least not anytime soon.

For one thing, money. (My older daughter, who has been all over the world on a student budget, tells me otherwise, but I’m not quite ready to stay in a hostel.)

But there’s more to it than our budget, which is still reeling from sending three kids to college in the past decade. It’s simple: When I weigh the benefits of traveling versus the pleasures of staying home, home wins.

I’m a reluctant traveler. Puzzling over schedules and departure times makes my blood pressure rise. I’m prone to motion sickness in cars and buses. I don’t do well in crowds, or loud places, or chaotic settings.

It probably goes without saying, but I’m an anxious flyer. White knuckle, check-the-weather-20-times anxious.

But mostly, I just don’t like leaving home. I experience a weird melancholy just rolling out of the driveway, a pull to go back before I’m even gone.

I do, however, take comfort in reminding myself many of my favorite writers (Jane Austen and C.S. Lewis spring to mind) were not great world travelers. Which didn’t stop them from having a profound understanding of human nature.

And sometimes I feel like I already have traveled around the world. I’ve spent so much time in books that some of those places and people feel more real than the ones I’ve known in my day-to-day world.

So, New York City this winter. It’s everything that makes me nervous and rattled and on edge.

On the other hand, there’s the sheer joy of taking our seats in a Broadway theater.

It’s a tradeoff.

If I can make it past our driveway, I’ll be fine. I think.

Charlotte is a columnist for The Times. You can reach her at charlottelatvala@gmail.com.

This article originally appeared on Beaver County Times: Latvala: It doesn’t take travel to see the world



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Delta Air Lines really doesn’t want to call the delta variant the ’delta variant’


“First, it is clear that the communication team wants to emphasize the distinction of the company from the current health crisis,” he said. “Second, they are implicitly conveying to employees and consumers alike that they are taking the situation seriously, including how they distinguish their company name from the current variant.”



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