Travel experts share tips to save on summer vacations


TAMPA, Fla. — The soaring cost of inflation is hitting all areas of our lives. Combine that with the high demand to get away, and people will certainly see an impact on any trips lined up this summer, but experts say there are ways to help save.

It’s no surprise people are ready for the perfect summer getaway.

“This is actually my second trip this year,” Jelene Wynn said.

Wynn just wrapped up a vacation in Tampa, but inflation she said does affect some of her planning for future trips.

“One of them like I’m looking at maybe driving versus flying, and then it’s four of us going to be in the car, so we can kind of split that difference, and I think it’s going to help that to come out a little bit cheaper,” Wynn said.

AAA reports while inflation is driving up costs, that doesn’t mean people are canceling their trips. Instead, it says many are making adjustments to offset the added expense, from staying in more affordable accommodations, choosing more affordable destinations, planning further ahead, and taking road trips instead of flying.

Though for people hitting the road, gas prices are still something to keep an eye on.

“In many cases, people are going to budget more on gasoline and maybe expect to spend a little less on the type of hotel they stay in and how much they spend on shopping and dining out,” AAA spokesperson Mark Jenkins said.

To fight those higher gas prices, AAA has a few suggestions: enroll in savings programs, get a tune up on your car, and use apps to find the lowest gas prices in your area. AAA’s gas cost calculator may also be a useful tool to help figure out anticipated fuel costs for a trip.

If you are flying for your next vacation, experts explained when it comes to airfare this summer, timing is everything.

“Expedia data revealed that August is actually the cheapest month to travel this summer,” Expedia spokesperson Christie Hudson said. “On average, airfare prices are about 10 percent cheaper than they are in June and about five percent cheaper than they are in July. So, if you’re looking to save a little bit, consider traveling especially during the last half of August when some people, especially in the south, have kind of gone back to school and the summer travel window is winding down.”

Loyalty programs are an easy way to rack up points toward rewards. Hudson said if you’re looking to save money, avoid traveling over the holiday and also look at when you’re departing.

“A lot of people want to travel Friday, Saturday, Sunday during the summer, and as a result, Friday’s are the most expensive day to buy tickets to travel during, so Tuesday is the cheapest day of the week, so if you can shift your trip to earlier in the week, travel midweek when you can, that’s going to save you a few dollars on your trip,” she said.

Despite inflation sending costs sky high, families are still finding ways to make it work to have a memorable vacation.

“It weighs in on everyday life, but I think when it came to the vacation, we were willing to splurge this time around,” TPA passenger Sydney Smelko said.





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Ask LP experts: top tips for summer travel 2022


Thinking about going on a big rail adventure through Europe, getting remote in the US national parks or perhaps a luxe visit to the idyllic scenes of the new Downton Abbey film in southeastern France? 

Well, you’re not alone. We polled the Lonely Planet community across our social media channels for all your questions regarding everything and anything summer travel. 

Read on for Lonely Planet experts’ top tips, advice and travel inspiration for what will be a very well-traveled summer of 2022. 

All about US and Canada travel this summer

sand boarding adventure in Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado
Out for a sandboarding adventure in Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado © David Spates / Shutterstock

Where can I take my kids to give them a great outdoor experience in the US?

Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado is a one-of-a-kind destination and especially fun with kids. Sandwiched between snowy mountains in Colorado’s San Luis Valley, the massive dune field rises in a series of gold-edged waves, hundreds of feet above the valley floor. Dune hiking is a must – no trails mean endless possibilities, impromptu races to sandy peaks and spectacular views. The descent, though, is where it’s at: sand sleds and boards (available for rent near the entrance) have kids zipping down the steep slopes, wiping out on the soft tawny sand and trekking back up to do it all over again. Spring snowmelt brings a temporary miracle: Medano Creek, a slow flowing waterway at the foot of the dunes, is perfect for wading and tubing, a legit sandy beach in the high desert. In the evening, pitch your tent at Pinyon Flats Campground or head to nearby Alamosa for creature comforts. – Liza Prado, Lonely Planet Writer

Natural highs: Colorado’s stunning national parks

What’s the best way to get out of the heat in summertime New Orleans?

When the scorching summer heat arrives, seek shade beneath the live oaks along New Orleans’ Bayou Metairie in City Park. Dripping with Spanish moss, these dense-leafed beauties cast wide shadows, making a fine retreat from the blazing sun. If that doesn’t do the trick, head to the nearby New Orleans Museum of Art, where you can see thought-provoking works, including a current exhibition on Queen Nefertari’s Egypt, amid heavenly air conditioning. – Regis St. Louis, Lonely Planet Writer

Best things to do in New Orleans: 15 unmissable things to see and do

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Introducing the USA’s National Parks

Are there any free US national parks I can visit this summer?

Yes! And probably a lot more than you think, too, since national parks also include parkways, historical parks and national seashores. Most people aren’t aware that the majority of the 423 national parks never charge admission for entry (only around 100 parks have an entry fee, in fact).

Of the top 25 most visited national parks in the United States, 11 of them do not charge an entry fee at all. That includes the following 7 parks, which are in the top 10 most visited: Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Gateway National Recreation Area, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Natchez Trace Parkway and the Lincoln Memorial.

Additionally, all 423 parks in the NPS system will offer free admission (including Denali National Park & Preserve, Joshua Tree National Park, Grand Canyon National Park and all of these ones that usually charge admission fees) this summer on August 4, 2022, the anniversary of the Great American Outdoors Act. Other free admission days this year include Sept. 24, 2022 (National Public Lands Day) and Nov. 11, 2022 (Veteran’s Day). Free entrance to national parks is also given to members of the military, military veterans, Gold Star Families, citizens with disabilities and all fourth-grade students. How awesome is that? Get out there and enjoy–even if you have to pay, you’re still supporting a vital and cherished federal service. – Terry Ward, Lonely Planet Writer

15 unforgettable experiences in US national parks for summer 2022

Bow Valley, a less crowded retreat to nature in Banff National Park
Bow Valley, a less crowded retreat to nature in Banff National Park © dszc / Getty Images

What’s the best way to avoid crowds in Canada’s national parks this summer? 

It’s hard to imagine you’d need to try to get away from crowds in Canada’s vast national parks ⁠— but their beauty lures in millions of visitors each year.

However, with so much focus placed on national parks, provincial and territorial parks are often overlooked. They also provide epic outdoor experiences but lack the international reputation of a Jasper or Cape Breton Highlands. If you’ve been dreaming of the soaring mountains and turquoise lakes of Banff, Bow Valley and Peter Lougheed provincial parks are only a short drive away ⁠and offer similar scenery ⁠— but at spots you probably haven’t seen all over Instagram.

If there’s a particular national park you’re excited to explore, by all means, go. Do your research and you’re sure to find a less trodden path. But also research nearby provincial parks. You’ll still find stunning scenery and if you do run into crowds, they’re more likely to be locals ⁠— so you may even get a tip on a must-see spot. – Alex Butler, Lonely Planet Staff

When is the best time to visit US and Canada’s national parks?

What are some of the best art destinations in the US for the summer?

As travel is picking up, the art scene is, too, with new museums, can’t-miss exhibitions and exciting installations from coast to coast. Here are three destinations where you can get your culture fix this summer.

New York City: There’s no denying that New York City reigns supreme when it comes to arts and culture — and now it’s back and better than ever. The new Museum of Broadway celebrates the rich history of the Great White Way. Set in the Hudson River, the recently opened Little Island is an architecturally dazzling public park with arts programming ranging from music to dance. Then there’s Governors Island, where Collective Retreats has launched an artist-in-residence program, where guests can engage with the artists and view destination-inspired pieces.

Washington, DC: In honor of its 175th anniversary, the Smithsonian is pulling out all the stops in 2022. The biggest news: the Smithsonian Latino Center, opening within the National Museum of American History and telling the complicated history of the Latino experience in America. Plus there are plenty of shows not to miss, from the must-awaited Yayoi Kusama exhibition at the Hirshhorn Museum (complete with infinity mirror rooms) to a retrospective of Watergate artwork at the Portrait Gallery. Stay at the female-themed Hotel Zena, which is like a living museum filled with artwork by and about women.

Tusla, Oklahoma: When it comes to major art cities, Tulsa might not be at the top of your hit list, but this city is fast becoming an emerging cultural destination. The Bob Dylan Center, a museum dedicated to the legendary singer and his work, just opened right next to the Woody Guthrie Center, which honors the “Father of Folk.” Other cultural stops include the revitalized Arts District (with art crawls, museums and galleries) and the 66-acre Gathering Place, a waterfront park with plenty of art events and sculptures on display. – Laura Begley Bloom, Lonely Planet Writer

MoMA’s new gallery puts Ukrainian-born artists in the spotlight

A backpacker stops to take in the splendor of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon
A backpacker stops to take in the splendor of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon © Cavan Images RF / Getty

What are the best outdoor destinations in the US for the summer?

In summer when many Americans explore the great outdoors, it can be a challenge to find destinations not entirely overrun with crowds. For travelers looking to visit a few headliners in peak travel months but also occasionally escape the masses, a road trip along the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway that stretches between California and Oregon strikes just the right balance.

Stretching from Northern California’s Lassen Volcanic National Park and ending at Crater Lake National Park in Southern Oregon, the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway passes up to ten volcanoes within the Cascade Range. The road trip also includes Mount Shasta and Lava Beds National Monument.

Each volcano along the byway is entirely unique. Lassen has bubbling mud pots and geothermal features. Mount Shasta offers jaw-dropping views or even a challenging climb for the adventurous and prepared. Lava Beds present the opportunity to explore and crawl through cooled lava tubes. And Crater Lake’s collapsed caldera filled with clear blue water is a sight to behold.

I’d recommend taking about 5-7 days for this road trip to slow down and take in the sights along the back roads. Camping and RVing are popular in the region, but inexpensive motels are also an option. Consider continuing north and ending in Bend, Oregon where Newberry Volcanic National Monument is located. – Leslie Harvey, Lonely Planet Writer

Plan a drive on America’s most iconic road trips

Big adventures and top insights for Europe travel this summer

A cyclist climbs Col des Aravis in the Haute-Savoie region of France
A cyclist climbs Col des Aravis in the Haute-Savoie region of France © Justin Paget / Getty

I’m looking for a peaceful spot in France to holiday this summer, with mountains, water and no crowds. Where can you suggest?

The Aravis mountains, between Mont Blanc and Lake Annecy in Savoie and Haute-Savoie. The key hubs, La Clusaz and Le Grand Bornand, are reasonably well-known among winter sports enthusiasts. But meander away from these towns into largely unsung, alpine landscapes strewn with ancient footpaths and pastoral shepherds’ huts and you find hidden spots cooking up peace, tranquility – and Savoyard gastronomy – in spades. This is the land of creamy Reblochon and Tomme cheese, tangy saucisson (air-dried sausage) and organic zero-kilometer dishes peppered with wildflowers and herbs foraged on the mountainside (Chalet de Paccaly, with mountain guide and botanist Astrid Marty at the helm, is a favorite lunch address).

Cycling, e-biking and scenic motoring is hot here: the Col des Aravis mountain pass linking La Clusaz and Le Grand-Bornand is part of the mythical Route des Grandes Alpes – an incredible 720km road trip from Lake Geneva to the French Riviera by way 17 hairy mountain passes in the French Alps. Mermaids seeking water can dip in Lake Annecy (the ‘busier’ option), hike up to crystal-clear alpine lakes like Lac des Confins or Lac du Mont Charvin (clearly created with star-topped bivouacking in mind), or dabble in heart-warming Tummo yoga in glacial rivers. In short, if you’re seeking a deep dive into untouched nature, Aravis is it. – Nicola Williams, Lonely Planet Writer

The 12 best beaches in France

Expert tips for camping in Iceland

What’s your favorite summertime thing to do with your kids in Iceland?

My kids are going to fiercely disagree with this answer, but OUR favorite summertime activity in Iceland is camping. Each trip begins with me bulldozing gear and family members into the car and then, halfway out of the driveway, check the weather forecast to see where to go. Foreseeable sunshine dictates everything. If the warmest spot is a one-hot spring village five hundred kilometers away – well, buckle up. Last year, it was Hallormsstaður Forest. Super fun, right kids? – Egill Bjarnason, Lonely Planet Writer

In Iceland’s remote Westfjords region, a new bicycle route takes shape

A train hugs the coast of Manarola, Italy
Use your Interrail pass to glide through Europe: Manarola, Italy © Diana Robinson Photography / Getty Images

I want to go Interrailing this summer but I only have seven days – where should I go?

Even a cursory glance at the Interrail map shows the size of Europe’s rail network – and just how much fun pass holders can have.

Bear in mind there are many different types of Interrail pass, covering individual countries (known as Country passes) and the entire continent (Global passes). If you live outside the EU and UK, you’ll need a Eurail pass – prices work out roughly the same. Youth and senior travelers pay less.

You might not even need a pass. Many of Europe’s trains require a seat reservation or, in some cases, the payment of a supplement for pass holders. The passes described above may work out more expensive than four point-to-point journeys – which is the maximum you should take in this time period – depending on where you go and how far in advance you book. You can compare options at trainline.com. Then again, point-to-point tickets will not give you the flexibility of a pass, nor any of the helpful discounts on other transport like mountain cable cars or entry to attractions pass holders enjoy.

So, without turning this into an essay, I’d say with seven days get the Italy country pass and take a route connecting Venice, Bologna, Florence (pausing in Pisa en route) and Rome, adding on Naples if you’re very energetic. It’s more than you’d normally cover with a week in Italy but it makes great use of your pass.

With a Global Pass valid for four days travel across a one-month period you could take in Amsterdam, Paris, Vienna – taking the convenient night train connection – and Budapest as a bonus.

That’s two very brief options. If there’s any way you can beg, borrow or steal a few extra days you can stay longer, travel and really start to use that pass. – Tom Hall, Lonely Planet Staff

Europe’s top 10 scenic train journeys for 2022

Exploring Snowdonia's Gylder Fach in Wales
Exploring Snowdonia’s Gylder Fach in Wales © Sebastien Coell / Shutterstock

I want to go on a big adventure in Europe that isn’t on any bucket lists, can you recommend a place?

Wales. I’m unashamedly biased but the country of my birth is a wild land of craggy peaks and wave-lashed shores, all wrapped up in ancient Celtic myths and legends. It’s also often totally overlooked by travelers to Britain.

The mountains clamber to over 1000 meters up in the Snowdonia National Park, a place that was muse to Romantic poets like Wordsworth back in the day. Skip Yr Wyddfa, the highest, in favor of the sleeping-dragon peak of Tryfan or haunting Glyder Fawr, where the assemblages of dagger-like rocks are known as the Devil’s Kitchen.

For beaches, go south to Pembrokeshire and the Gower. Sweeping sands at Llangennith hoover up the Atlantic swell there for surfers and there are long-distance hiking paths that link seal-filled coves and puffin-stalked islands alike. – Joe Francis, Lonely Planet Writer

The 10 most beautiful hikes in Wales

The colorful and sunny shores of Carvoeiro, Portugal
The colorful and sunny shores of Carvoeiro, Portugal © Pawel Kazmierczak / Shutterstock

What sunny European destination is cheapest in summer? 

There are some more affordable locations once you are on the ground. Bulgaria’s Black Sea beaches, Turkey’s beautiful Aegean Mediterranean coast and Portugal’s Atlantic seaside all represent good value for meals and shopping.

A destination is only cheap if it hasn’t cost you a fortune in flying there. It’s vital to factor in not just the cost of a plane ticket (or train ticket – this is Europe) but getting to and from the airport, and any money you spend while making the journey. This can make the per-day difference in choosing a less expensive destination less relevant. Another big factor is accommodation, and whether you have any meals included. There’s strong demand across the continent this year as travelers look to make up for lost vacation time. This combined with high fuel costs and increases in the cost of living across Europe means there won’t be too many deals during peak months of July and August even for late availability specials. – Tom Hall, Lonely Planet Staff

Why the Azores are Europe’s secret islands of adventure

Where is the villa where they filmed Downton Abbey: A New Era? 

I looked this up right after I saw the movie last week. The villa inherited by Violet Crawley is actually La Rocabella in Le Pradet, on the coast of southeastern France. If you have tens of thousands of dollars to burn, you can also rent it for your own private, Crawley family-esque Cote d’Azur sojourn. Or you can just watch the movie again. – Brekke Fletcher, Lonely Planet Staff

Downton Abbey the movie: filming locations you can visit

Naplavka, the go-to riverside hangout for summer fun in Prague
Naplavka, the go-to riverside hangout for summer fun in Prague © Ivana Larrosa

Where should I go in Europe for outdoor fun this summer?

Around 2009, the city of Prague removed the parking lots that had existed on the Vltava River embankments, just south of the city center, starting where Frank Gehry’s “Dancing House” meets the Jirasek Bridge. And with that, locals began setting up impromptu outdoor bars along the eastside of the river, beginning with Bajkazyl, a bike shop and bar. A few years after that, Naplavka, as its called, began growing into a near-mile, outdoor, warm-weather strip of bars, some of which are on moored boats and barges.

Today, Naplavka is more popular than ever. With Prague Castle and the Gothic spires of St Vitus Cathedral looming in the distance, revelers sit along the river nursing frothy pints of pilsner as buskers sing and street vendors cook up snacks. On Saturdays, a popular flea market plants itself here. Naplavka has become the go-to place for outdoor amusement in Prague. – David Farley, Lonely Planet Writer

Prague’s best nightlife: great pubs, bars and live music for the perfect night out

Discover Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

I’m traveling to Ireland and I hear renting a car is a nightmare. Do you have any suggestions? 

In Ireland, there are reports that the cost of car hire has tripled and at times quadrupled since before the pandemic. A lack of cars in the rental market has meant that many visitors are unable to secure car hire for the duration of their visit. The increased demand with return to travel along with a shortage of certain car components has meant that European care hire is at a premium now for visitors. Ireland however is compact, and all parts of the country can be accessed through a network of busses and trains. Be sure to do your research in advance, know the routes you need to take and reserve seats online to ensure the cheapest rate and that you get seated with your companions. Sit back, relax, leaving the driving to someone else and enjoy the views. – Fionnuala McCarthy, Lonely Planet Staff

Car or public transport? How best to get around in Ireland

The relaxed, family-friendly vibes of Brač Island, Croatia
The relaxed, family-friendly vibes of Brač Island, Croatia © Pawel Kazmierczak / Shutterstock

Where is good to go in Croatia with kids? 

Brač Island is a great choice to experience the best of Croatian island life with the entire family. The world-famous Zlatni Rat has calm, shallow waters and is great for splashing and snorkeling. The promenade from Bol to the beach is easily navigated with prams and there’s a play area and an inflatable water park to enjoy on the way. Further inland, there are ancient fortress ruins to explore or get a guided tour to see the Dragon’s Cave (about an hour’s walk from Bol). – AnneMarie McCarthy, Lonely Planet Staff

See the best of Croatia with this week-long itinerary

Epic hikes around the world

Exploring global destinations

Nine Arches Bridge in Sri Lanka
Capturing the moment at Nine Arches Bridge in Sri Lanka © Cavan Images / Getty Images

Is it safe to travel to Sri Lanka, I’m already booked? 

Sri Lanka is going through a tough patch at the moment. Hot on the heels of the pandemic, the country is facing a full-blown economic crisis that has already led to a change of government. The UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office is currently advising against all but essential travel to Sri Lanka because of the risk of unrest and shortages of essential supplies.

But this is not the whole picture. While the country has seen violent demonstrations and curfews, trouble has been concentrated in the capital, Colombo, and other large cities. The airport lies north of the capital, and it’s possible to bypass Colombo when heading to beach resorts along the coast.

A bigger problem for visitors is the shortage of essential commodities. Petrol, cooking gas and medicines are in short supply, and there have been periodic interruptions to the electricity supply. If you have to visit Sri Lanka at this time, stick to self-contained beach resorts with their own generators, and avoid crowds and other potential flashpoints. – Joe Bindloss, Lonely Planet Staff

8 of the top surfing spots in Sri Lanka: experience the best waves whatever the season

The best of Caribbean islands

What is the best Caribbean island to avoid the crowds?

Dominica is the perfect Caribbean destination to avoid crowds. Situated in the southern part of the Caribbean, close to the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, Dominica’s nickname is “Nature Island”.

The country boasts an extensive network of hiking trails, wonderful diving opportunities and a boiling lake – the second-largest in the world.

Perhaps it’s because people confuse the country with the Dominican Republic or its lack of large, glitzy all-inclusive resorts, but Dominica is an oft-overlooked country. Sure it’s not your typical Caribbean island with white-sand beaches (the beaches are black due to the nine volcanoes), but trust me, that’s definitely part of the appeal. – Alicia Johnson, Lonely Planet Staff

8 of the best surf spots in the Caribbean: turquoise waves and paradise beach breaks

COVID-19 travel concerns for summer 2022

Should you bring a mask while traveling?
Capturing the moment at Nine Arches Bridge in Sri Lanka © Cavan Images / Getty Images

Do I still need to pack a mask?

It depends on where you’re going and who you’re flying with but generally speaking, yes. Even though the US and many countries in Europe have dropped mask mandates, most nations elsewhere require them on flights and in airports. And individual airlines can still set their own rules. If we’ve learned anything during the pandemic it’s that rules can change with very little notice. So it’s a good idea to have a mask with you just in case you need it, particularly an FFP2/N95/KN95 mask. Purchase some in advance and keep them in your hand luggage because you don’t want to be caught short at the airport where prices for masks tend to be higher. – Sasha Brady, Lonely Planet Staff

Traveling to the US? Here’s how to meet the one-day testing rule

What do you do if you get COVID when traveling?

So unfortunately the possibility of getting COVID-19 when traveling is something we have to consider. Travel does require some preparation now.

First of all, make sure you are fully vaccinated and boosted before travel. Second, before you travel, make sure you buy travel insurance where COVID-19 isn’t an excluding factor for coverage. These policies typically will reimburse you for expenses due to quarantining and also cover medical expenses should you need treatment.

Even if your destination does not require it, you may want to test before departure. Better to find out you’re testing positive and isolate at home than have to do so abroad. If you do get it while traveling, don’t travel and risk exposing others. You’ll need to isolate. From contacting your host/hotel to rescheduling your flight, here’s a detailed explanation of what to do next.

One thing I’m doing for my travels is packing a home test kit so I have one on hand in case of an emergency. Finally, it goes without saying if you’re not feeling well, don’t travel. – Melissa Yeager, Lonely Planet Staff

CDC now recommends COVID-19 testing for all domestic travel



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Anxious about summer travel? Experts have tips to keep worried travelers comfortable


SUMMER TRAVEL. MARCIE: TRAVEL IS DEFINITELY BACK IN FULL SWING. YOU CAN SEE JUST HOW BUSY IT IS HERE AT PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BUT EXPERTS TELL ME THERE ARE ILSTL A LOT OF PANDEMICEA FRS, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION, IT’S JUST SHIFTED A BIT. >> WE’VE SEEN SORT OF TWO SISDE OF THE SAME COIN. MARCIE: IN THE CROWDS AND ALONE, THE PANDEMIC HAS CREATED CHA.OS >> I JUST THINK WE HAVE TO GET OVER IT EVENTUALLY. >> I’M NOT SURE WHY PEOPLE ARE SO EAGER TO REEMBRACE A LACK OF EMPATHY. MARCIE: AMONG TRAVELERS. >> I THINK EVERNYBODY HAS THE RIGHT TO AND THE FREEDOM TO ARWE A MASK OR NOT WEAR ONE. >> IT’S JUST THE RESPONSIBLE THING TO DO TO MODEL GOOD BEHAVIOR. MARCIE: WE ARE SEEING IT ALL. SOME DROPPED THEIR MASHE TKS SECOND THE REQUIREMENT ENDED WHILOTE HERS ARE HOLDING TIGHT TO FACE COVERINGS AND DISTANCE . DOCTORS SAY IT IS CLEAR FOR MANY COVID IS STILL A STRUGE.GL >>N OONE HAND, PEOPLE KIND OF JUST WITH COVID FATIGUE, JUST TIRED OF THE WHOLE TNGHI. AND NOW AFRAID TO GET BACK IN TO THE WORLD. MARCIE: DR. ANTHONY MANNARINO IS THE CHAIR OF PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH FOR ALLEENYGH HEALTH NETWORK. HE S AYS WITH COVID RESTRICTIONS LOOSENED, WE HAVE TO LET GO A LITTLE T.OO >> IT’S RMNOAL TO BE SOMEWTHA AFRAID. I MEAN, THE PANDEMIC HAS MADE A LOT OF PEOPLE SICK AND MYAN PEOPLE HAVE DIED. ARNELY A MILLION PEOPLE IN THE U.S.. THAT IS A LOT OF PEOE.PL SO IT’S NORMAL TO BE AFRAID TO GET BACK IN TO THE WORLD. MARCIE: DR. MANNARINO SAYITS SHOULD HAPPEN THOUGH AT YOUR OWN PACE. >> I WOULD SAY IT IS KIND OF LIKE GOING INTO A SWIMMING POOL WITH COLD WATER. YOU PUT YOUR TOEINS FIRST AND THEN YOUR FEET AND YOUR LEGS. JUST DO IT GRADUALLY UNTIL YOU’RE MORE COMFORTABLE. BUT IF U AVOID IT, YOUR FEAR IS JUST GOING TO GO UP. MARCIE: MNAANRINO SAYS IT MAY BE A PROCESS TO GETAC BK OUT AND FEELING SAFE IN THE WAY YOU DID PRE-PANDEMIC. ESPECIALLY HE SAYS IF YOU’VE BEEN INSIDE AND AVOIDING PEOPLE AND TRAVEL. >> I WOULD ADVISE PEOPLE TO TAKE ONE SMALL STEP AT A TIME SO IF THEY WANT TO GO TO A RESTAURTAN FOR EXAMPLE, GO TO A RESTAURANT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WEEK. NOT ON THE WEEKEND. GO WHEN IT’S LIKELY TO BE LSES CROWDED THAN MORE CROWDED. IF YOU ARE GOING TO A MALL, DO NOT GO ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 1:00. GO AT 8:00 ON TUESDAY NIGHT WHEN LE SS PEOPLE WILL BE THERE. BE COMFORTABLE AND TAKE SMALL STEPS FORWARD TO INTIGRANGTI YOURELF IN TO THE WORKPLACE,N TO THE COMMUNITY, ENTER RESTAURANTS, ENTER THE MALL, GOING ON VACATION. OTHERWISE, WE WILL ALL STAY INDOORS FOR THE REST OF OUR LIVES. WE CAN’T DO THAT. MARCIE: SO AS THE WORLD STARTS TO SLIDE BACK TOWARDHE WRE WE WERE MORE THAN TWO YEARS AGO, WITH MASK MANDATES DROPPED JUST ABOUT EVERYWHERE, >> I WILL DO ANYTHING TO STAASY PROTECTED AS I CAN. MAIE:RC DR. MANNARINO SAYS IT IS STILL OK TO DECIDE FOR YOURSELVES. >> I HAVE YOUNG CHILDREN AT HOME. MARCIE: AS LONG AS YOUR CHOICES AREN’T CONTROLLED BY FEAR AND THAT YOU’RE GETTING OUT. NO MATTER WHAT IT TAKES. >> A LOT OF PSCHYING MYSELF UP AND MAKING SURE I TAKE THE PRECAUTIONS THAT I CAN. MARC:IE DR. MANNARINO SAYS WHATS MOST IMPORTANT IS THAT YOU DON’T HIDE OR STOP LIVING OUT OF WORRY. >>F I THEY ARE GOING TO WAIT IT OUT, THEY ARE GOING TO HAVE TO WAIT A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT LIKE COVID IS GOING TO BE AROUND FOR THE INDEFINITE FUTURE. MARC

Anxious about summer travel? Experts have tips to keep worried travelers comfortable

The summer travel season is ramping up, but with the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, that means some folks are feeling travel anxiety.Dr. Anthony Mannarino is the chair of psychiatry and behavioral health for Allegheny Health Network. He says with COVID-19 restrictions loosened, we have to let go a little, too. “It’s normal to be somewhat afraid,” he said. “I mean the pandemic has made a lot of people sick and many people have died. Nearly a million people in the U.S., so it’s normal to be afraid to get back into the world.”Mannarino said it should happen though, at your own pace.“It’s kind of like going into a swimming pool with cold water. You put your toes in first, and then your feet, and your legs. Just do it gradually until you’re more comfortable, but if you avoid it, your fear is just going to go up.” Mannarino said it may be a process to get back out and feel safe in the way you did pre-pandemic. Especially, he says, if you’ve been inside and avoiding people and travel. “I would advise people to take one small step at a time,” he said. “So if they want to go to a restaurant, for example, go to a restaurant in the middle of the week, not on the weekend. Go when it’s likely to be less crowded than more crowded.”Mannarino said it is still OK to decide for yourself what you’re most comfortable with, as long as your choices aren’t controlled by fear. He said it’s important that you’re getting out. No matter what it takes. “If they’re gonna wait it out, they’re gonna have a long time to wait, because it looks like COVID is gonna be around for the indefinite future,” Mannarino added. If you are dealing with pandemic stress and trying to get back to pre-pandemic life, click here for additional tools.

The summer travel season is ramping up, but with the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, that means some folks are feeling travel anxiety.

Dr. Anthony Mannarino is the chair of psychiatry and behavioral health for Allegheny Health Network. He says with COVID-19 restrictions loosened, we have to let go a little, too.

“It’s normal to be somewhat afraid,” he said. “I mean the pandemic has made a lot of people sick and many people have died. Nearly a million people in the U.S., so it’s normal to be afraid to get back into the world.”

Mannarino said it should happen though, at your own pace.

“It’s kind of like going into a swimming pool with cold water. You put your toes in first, and then your feet, and your legs. Just do it gradually until you’re more comfortable, but if you avoid it, your fear is just going to go up.”

Mannarino said it may be a process to get back out and feel safe in the way you did pre-pandemic. Especially, he says, if you’ve been inside and avoiding people and travel.

“I would advise people to take one small step at a time,” he said. “So if they want to go to a restaurant, for example, go to a restaurant in the middle of the week, not on the weekend. Go when it’s likely to be less crowded than more crowded.”

Mannarino said it is still OK to decide for yourself what you’re most comfortable with, as long as your choices aren’t controlled by fear. He said it’s important that you’re getting out. No matter what it takes.

“If they’re gonna wait it out, they’re gonna have a long time to wait, because it looks like COVID is gonna be around for the indefinite future,” Mannarino added.

If you are dealing with pandemic stress and trying to get back to pre-pandemic life, click here for additional tools.



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Experts Recommend Staying Up-To-Date On Vaccines When Traveling


Experts report a high number of people are expected to travel internationally in the coming months since many countries have relaxed COVID-19 restrictions.

For those trying to get required or recommended travel vaccines, experts recommend planning early.

Borders in parts of the world, such as Australia and Asia, have reopened, while Europe is relaxing some restrictions.

With all these changes, many travel barriers from the pandemic will disappear.

Victoria Sowards with Passport Health, which has travel clinics all over the country including Broken Arrow, shared with News On 6 what staff has been seeing.

“We’re seeing a great increase in the number of people traveling right now,” said Sowards. “There’s a lot of people that are going back into mission work into Kenya and other parts of Africa, as well as tourists wanting to travel.”

Sowards said she recommends international travelers get a consultation at least six weeks before the trip to go over medical history and discuss required or recommended vaccines, which could cost as much as $500 total.

Common ones include Hepatitis A and B, malaria, typhoid and yellow fever.

Those last three vaccines mentioned are harder to find.

“We know that vaccines are safe and effective and prevent diseases not only for individuals who are staying in Tulsa County but those that are traveling out of Tulsa County as well,” said Ellen Niemitalo with the Tulsa Health Department.

Niemitalo said people have been calling about travel vaccines but the THD suspended overseas immunizations to focus on COVID-19 efforts.

“We have been rebuilding and retraining new staff and the goal is, like I said, all of healthcare to go ahead and offer those travel vaccines sometime in the next few months,” said Niemitalo.

Experts recommend reading CDC recommendations about your destination and having a plan in case you get sick while traveling.

Some places do require travelers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, and all travelers need a negative COVID-19 test before returning to the United States.



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Mistakes to Avoid When Planning Your Memorial Day Getaway, According to Experts




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Experts share their advice to enhance your sense of adventure


Travel is back and if you can’t wait to get out in the world again, we might be able to help and inspire you.

Join Good Housekeeping’s Deputy Editor and travel expert Emma Justice as she hosts a panel discussion on “How to Develop a Sense of Adventure” both at home and abroad in partnership with Travelbag.

Our travel experts and panellists will include former BBC Breakfast Presenter Louise Minchin, British explorer Belinda Kirk, author Jacki Hill-Murphy, and Lesley Rollo, the Managing Director of Travelbag.

The event will focus on the return of travel and why having a sense of adventure and discovering new places, people and cultures is important for our mental wellbeing.

Our four panellists will talk about why we love to explore the world (and some of the incredible adventures they’ve all been on) as well as the idea that you can still have adventures closer to home, if you learn how to switch on a more adventurous mindset and look at the world differently.

Historically, we’ve always travelled into the unknown and women have been at the forefront of that, so author and adventurer Jacki Hill-Murphy will talk about some of the most intrepid female explorers of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Isabela Godin was the first woman to travel the length of the Amazon in 1769 in a dugout canoe, while Isabella Bird climbed over the Himalayas of Ladakh on a yak in 1889! Jacki will talk about their adventures and how she has followed in their footsteps and recreated some of their pioneering journey’s.

Former BBC Breakfast Presenter Louise Minchin, who is well known for her own sporting adventures as well as I’m A Celebrity!, is currently finishing her new book Adventures with Superwomen. In it she meets and writes about the inspiring women taking on the toughest challenges in sport and will discuss what she thinks it takes to achieve these.

Meanwhile, British explorer Belinda Kirk, who has walked across Nicaragua and searched for camels in China’s Desert of Death, will discuss her Adventure Revolution’ and her award-winning book of the same name.

Adventure Revolution: The life-changing power of choosing challenge

Piatkus
amazon.co.uk

£10.73

It’s all about the life-changing power of choosing challenge and she will explain how Good Housekeeping‘s readers can do the same.

Finally, if all that has inspired you to book your own big adventure, Lesley Rollo, who has worked in travel for 25 years and is the Managing Director of Travelbag, will also be sharing how you can make travelling to multiple destinations less daunting and make seemingly complex tailor made travels a reality.

Taking place on Saturday 25 June, the event is part of GH LIVE in partnership with Dyson, , a three-day festival of events to celebrate our 100th anniversary,

It will take place in the elegant setting of Carlton House Terrace, beautifully scented by Zoflora, in the heart of London’s St James’s.

Tickets costs £60 and include the talk, two drinks tokens and access to the GH Live House including the coffee and Champagne bar as well as a special anniversary goody bag to take home.

BOOK NOW


Good Housekeeping Live in partnership with Dyson is a three-day festival of events (23-25 June 2022) to celebrate our 100th anniversary.

We’re delighted to offer you the opportunity to join the Good Housekeeping team for a packed programme featuring some of our favourite stars, experts and authors, and encompassing live talks, masterclasses, cookery demonstrations and afternoon teas.

Other guests include Marian Keyes, Fern Britton, and Kelly Hoppen. We will also be holding talks and sharing tips on “How to create a sustainable kitchen” as well as tips on “How to get published“, among many others.

FULL LINE UP

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io



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How to Keep an Open Bottle of Wine Fresh, According to the Experts




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Here’s How To Safely Travel Again, Per Travel Experts


At Well+Good, we spend our days talking to and learning from the most interesting people in wellness—experts, thought-leaders, and celebrities. Now, we’re inviting you to join the conversation. Welcome to the Well+Good podcast, your guide to finding the habits and practices that fit your frequency. Read More

Following COVID-19 being declared a pandemic in 2020, air travel came to an almost complete standstill, with bans and quarantine requirements enacted to slow transmission of the virus. Two years later, though, those restrictions have finally eased as we’ve gained some control over the virus. As a result, globetrotting is happily back on the agenda for many. But, learning how to safely travel again isn’t necessarily quite as straightforward as returning to your pre-COVID ways. Before you jet-set, the most important thing to do, in fact, is figure out which COVID-related requirements are still in place for travel to your destination.

Ascertaining how to do just that and get back on your travel game safely is the topic of the most recent episode of The Well+Good Podcast, during which Italy-based travel guide Andrea Gambino; Costa Rica-based tourism expert Guillermo Aguilar; and travel expert Alexis Bowen, co-founder of Elsewhere (a company that links travelers with local destination experts), share the ways they’ve personally seen the nature of travel change in the wake of the pandemic.

Listen to the full episode here:

According to Bowen, the most important thing you can do now when traveling, especially internationally, is to stay up-to-date with the COVID-related regulations of your home country and of the location to which you’re trekking. “Things are still changing, and that’s without a doubt, so what I would recommend is continuously checking both with the U.S. State Department and with the local government of where you’re traveling [to see what their rules are],” says Bowen, adding that folks should do this from the moment they book their flights and up until the day before flying.

“As long as you’re checking and are really on top of everything, it’s just [about] adapting to these new rules,” Bowen says. But what even are those new rules, you might ask? At the top of the list is vaccination status. You can check the CDC website to determine whether your travel destination requires you to be vaccinated (as some, but not all countries do).

Another important travel consideration, says Bowen, is whether you’ll be required to show proof of a negative COVID test result to enter the country you’re visiting—but, thankfully, that’s a relatively easy hurdle to surpass now that “testing has gotten much faster and more efficient,” she adds, given that many destinations now simply require an antigen test and not a PCR. (Some context: A PCR test searches for the genetic material of the virus, while the quicker antigen test—which you might know as a rapid test—is looking for its proteins.) “Getting a PCR used to take multiple days, and you never knew if you could get the result in time for your flight,” says Bowen. The antigen test, though, is done usually within 15 minutes.

“The last thing is just certifying that you have not been in contact with anyone who has COVID and that you do not have any symptoms,” says Bowen. That first bit is part of contact tracing, which is a process that allows epidemiologists to help slow the spread of COVID by identifying folks who may have been in contact with someone who tested positive (and then encouraging them to self-isolate). Essentially, this measure helps ensure that you’re not hopping on a plane after recently sharing airspace with someone COVID-positive.

“I can say with confidence that we’re past the stage of impromptu cancelations from either hotels or airlines, or borders being closed.” —Alexis Bowen, travel expert

Even though we’re not living in a completely post-COVID world—after all, there are still emerging variants—safe travel is more navigable now than it’s been for the past couple years. “I can say with confidence that we’re past the stage of impromptu cancelations from either hotels or airlines, or borders being closed,” says Bowen. So, learning how to travel again just comes down to following the right precautions (*ahem* Bowen’s insights).

And, rest assured, doing so will be well worth your while. “Travel still remains an incredibly powerful thing,” says Bowen. “It is one of the best things that you can do for your mental well-being and for your physical well-being. You can never underestimate the power of a change in scenery to reset, recharge, and restore.”

For more information on how to travel again, as well as expert intel on how the pandemic has changed traveling for the better, listen to the full podcast episode here.

Ready to join the (podcast) conversation? At Well+Good, we spend our days talking to and learning from the most interesting people. Sign up to make sure you don’t miss out on an episode!





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Travel experts share tips on how to save on plane tickets


Exerts said flying on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Saturday is “significantly cheaper” than flying on a Monday, Friday or Sunday.

BEAUMONT, Texas — With the school year coming to a close and summer on the horizon, Southeast Texans are already thinking of destinations for summer vacations. 

Community members are looking for where to travel and ways to save. There are rumored tips and tricks that suggest when it comes to travelling by plane, getting cheap tickets is all in the timing. 

“We booked it two months in advance, so we got a pretty good deal,” a Southeast Texas traveler said.

Some believe booking an airline ticket on different days of the week can have a major difference in the price. Experts said a number of different factors play into how much a traveler will pay for a ticket.

“If you waited until May, mid-May to book your summer travel, you’re not out of luck but you are in a tougher situation,” Willis Orlando, Scott’s Cheap Flights employee, said. “So, you need to be as strategic as possible.”

Orlando said there is still hope for those looking to catch cheaper flights for their summertime vacations. The expert shared his top three tips on scoring a deal when travelling for the summer.

First, the expert encourages travelers to be flexible with their dates. Orlando confirmed flying on certain days is a lot cheaper than on others.

“If you can be flexible, if you can say, ‘Listen, I understand the flying on a Tuesday or a Wednesday or a Saturday is significantly cheaper almost across the board than flying on a Monday or Friday or Sunday,’ you’re much more likely to find a good deal,” Orlando said.

A 12News crew put the strategy to the test by searching for flights from Houston to Miami for a week in July. When crews looked at July 15 and July 22, which are both Fridays, the lowest price was $292.

When the days switched to July 12 and July 19, which are Tuesday, the price dropped to $201.

Orlando also highly suggests that travelers check competing airlines. Houston is a hub for United Airlines and competing airlines always try to dig the competition.

Lastly, Orlando said Texans should book a season ahead. Two to three months ahead is ideal for domestic flights.

As a bonus tip, Orlando said the destination matters as much as the day.

“If you want to go to the Florida Panhandle, or what have you, and everybody else, you know, you’re gonna pay more,” Orlando said. “Consider the inland or the mountains or the northeast or these places that are coolers for summertime. You’ll find great deals, small crowds, cheap hotel prices. It’s a good time to travel to those places.”

Orlando also said travelers should track their flights, so they can be alerted when prices drop or when they’re about to increase.

Also on 12NewsNow.com … 



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