Northbound I-15 closed due to crash at milepost 60 in Cedar City – St George News


Traffic back-up on Interstate 15 in Cedar City, Utah, Dec. 29, 2021 | Photo by Jeff Richards, St. George News

CEDAR CITY — Traffic is at a complete standstill south of milepost 60 on northbound Interstate 15 in Cedar City.

Update 8:30 p.m. The crash was cleared as of Wednesday evening. See our full report about the incident here.

A rollover crash reported Wednesday at 4:41 p.m. prompted the closure.

According to the Utah Department of Transportation, the road is closed in the area of the crash and is expected to be cleared by 5:51 p.m. Motorists are encouraged to use an alternate route.

A Cedar City News reporter heading to the scene of the crash described the traffic situation as a complete standstill, with vehicles accumulating behind the incident.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.





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I ditched my mum for George Clooney – but I wouldn’t do it again


I can partly blame my job for this lack of long-term vision: as a freelance reporter, I spent 15 years with no idea of where I would be sent, possibly the next day, and on what strange assignment. One day I might be interviewing trawlermen in Dover, the next dancing in the background of a new UB40 music video in Antigua. The thrill of the unknown is addictive, and I loved not knowing what opportunity could land in my inbox – but I missed out on a lot by not committing to holidays with old friends and family. I’m sure many business owners and freelancers relate to this fear of making plans in case we miss out on a career-changing opportunity. But I’ve realised that I am much more scared by the prospect of not seeing my friends and family. Not seeing the people I love is the only FOMO worth listening to. 

My new way of thinking is a gift, and it’s an unexpected gift, because we could easily emerge from the pandemic with a mistrust of long-term plans. But I’m definitely hearing more people biting the bullet and booking a Portuguese villa in September with 10 friends, or a family Christmas in Lapland in 2022. My friend Lucy, a care worker, has just booked a solo road trip in Mexico next autumn. “I’ve wasted years not making holiday plans because I’ve been waiting to meet the man of my dreams to travel with me,” she said. “Of course Mexico is a trip I would love to do with a companion, but I’ve realised it’s crazy to put off making plans just in case I fall in love this weekend with someone who doesn’t want to go to Mexico but would like to take me to Rome instead. I’m done with that mindset.” 

This week, I have been pre-warning family members to bring their diaries at Christmas, and prepare to be grilled about potential reunion dates stretching into 2022. My mum laughed and reminded me of the time I cancelled a tea date with her on a visit to London that had been in the diary for weeks… in order to interview George Clooney in Paris. Mum took it graciously, of course; she just gave me strict instructions about what to wear, because like any loving mum, she thought I would be a perfect match for George, the woman he had been waiting for all his life, unable to plan holidays until he met me. 

We laughed about it, of course, but the thing that really amuses me now is how these past two years have changed me. Because today, there is no way I would choose George Clooney in Paris over a tea date with my mum.



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Following in George Clooney’s footsteps: Inside the luxurious Hilton Lake Como


Steam rises from the rooftop infinity pool which looks out across Lake Como as we enjoy a few lengths. A family is relaxing in the hot tub while a seaplane skims the still water and church bells chime. It is November but the sky is a shade of strong blue.

Italy was not an obvious choice for a long weekend break. The lively, somewhat chaotic scene that makes it so attractive ordinarily was not what we were after – relaxation was.

Yet after just a 90-minute flight from London to Milan and a 45-minute train ride to Lake Como, plus five minutes by taxi to the hotel, you can be sipping an aperitif and taking in views to die for.

There are 'views to die for' from Hilton Lake Como, The Mail on Sunday's Sarah Hartley says. Above is the hotel's stunning rooftop infinity pool

There are ‘views to die for’ from Hilton Lake Como, The Mail on Sunday’s Sarah Hartley says. Above is the hotel’s stunning rooftop infinity pool

Hilton Lake Como’s 'masterstroke', says Sarah, is that it occupies prime space just back from the waterfront

Hilton Lake Como’s ‘masterstroke’, says Sarah, is that it occupies prime space just back from the waterfront

Sarah recommends a boat trip on Lake Como - you'll pootle past 'jaw-dropping, unimaginably beautiful 16th Century villas'

Sarah recommends a boat trip on Lake Como – you’ll pootle past ‘jaw-dropping, unimaginably beautiful 16th Century villas’

Como is known for giving visitors a sense of eerie calm, penned in as it is by hillsides and the Alps beyond. And in low season, everywhere is taking a deep breath out.

The days when Como was a global leader in silk production are over, but the heritage remains.

Hilton Lake Como’s masterstroke, built in and around a former silk factory in 2018, is that it occupies prime space just back from the waterfront with what feels like a modern Asian vibe around a glass lounge and internal gardens. And it has bagged every hotel’s post-lockdown craving: tip-top staff.

Cool loft duplex suites are popular with couples who can retract their glass roof and star-gaze in bed, says Sarah

Cool loft duplex suites are popular with couples who can retract their glass roof and star-gaze in bed, says Sarah

Value: B&B rooms cost from €180 (£150) a night at Hilton Lake Como

Value: B&B rooms cost from €180 (£150) a night at Hilton Lake Como

Space is the buzzword. Cool loft duplex suites are popular with couples who can retract their glass roof and star-gaze in bed, while interconnecting suites with balconies are a bonus for families.

And it’s a hub for corporate functions and weddings – 1,000 guests descended on Como from India with a month’s notice for one summer wedding.

The hotel’s luxurious amounts of room immediately put you at ease, so it’s not hard to relax in the wide and spacious Satin restaurant at breakfast or stroll the light and airy halls – a relief for those with wheelchairs or buggies.

Unlike most hotels around the Lake Como, the Hilton is open all year

Unlike most hotels around the Lake Como, the Hilton is open all year

Hilton Lake Como's Satin restaurant, above, is where Sarah ate breakfast

Hilton Lake Como’s Satin restaurant, above, is where Sarah ate breakfast

If clouds descend, says Sarah, retreat to the comfort of the Hilton's adults-only spa with pool (above), sauna and steam, where treatments include the signature Silk Touch massage

If clouds descend, says Sarah, retreat to the comfort of the Hilton’s adults-only spa with pool (above), sauna and steam, where treatments include the signature Silk Touch massage

Unlike most hotels around the lake, this place is open all year (as is the rooftop pool) and must be spectacular at New Year – although, according to locals, it’s just as stunning in April when azaleas light up the hillside.

If clouds descend, retreat to the comfort of the adults-only spa with pool, sauna and steam, where treatments include the signature Silk Touch massage.

Wend your way down the few minutes from the hotel to the lake to find the elegant Villa Olmo, where dogs scamper through ornate public gardens and its statues run to the water’s edge. Follow the path past swans, feed ducks with leftover focaccia, spot herons and take part in the passeggiata, Italians’ staple evening stroll, along the beautiful waterside.

Hilton Lake Como's 'luxurious amounts of room immediately put you at ease', writes Sarah

Hilton Lake Como’s ‘luxurious amounts of room immediately put you at ease’, writes Sarah

Reaching Hilton Lake Como is a cinch - the journey from London involves a 90-minute flight, a 45-minute train ride and five minutes in a taxi

Reaching Hilton Lake Como is a cinch – the journey from London involves a 90-minute flight, a 45-minute train ride and five minutes in a taxi

With any luck you’ll catch sight of a seaplane gliding gently down – or take a trip yourself with Aero Club Como (from €240, aeroclubcomo.com). Want to hop on a Vespa? The hotel can arrange it, alongside picnic bike rides and private boat tours. Further along the marina, a flotilla of yachts marks the elegant Yacht Club Como, one of the oldest in Italy.

Besides Hollywood star George Clooney, who bought Villa Oleandra in 2001, the other luminary at Como is Alessandro Volta, the city’s favourite son and pioneer of electricity, credited as the inventor of the electric battery. This explains the extravagant lighting everywhere, from the parks to the flowery clusters in the hotel.

Looming over the lake shore is what looks like a concrete water tower but on closer inspection is a monolithic First World War memorial, commissioned by the fascists in the 1930s.

For a chilled Lake Como experience take the slow boat to Torno, pictured. Its church and villas are romantic, says Sarah, and in low season it’s quiet

For a chilled Lake Como experience take the slow boat to Torno, pictured. Its church and villas are romantic, says Sarah, and in low season it’s quiet 

The Volta Temple is a museum dedicated to Alessandro Volta, Como's favourite son and pioneer of electricity, credited as the inventor of the electric battery

The Volta Temple is a museum dedicated to Alessandro Volta, Como’s favourite son and pioneer of electricity, credited as the inventor of the electric battery

Sarah's verdict: 'While the big-ticket hotels [at Lake Como] such as Villa D’Este and The Mandarin Oriental are knockout for one night, Hilton Lake Como’s low-key luxury makes for a longer no-stress, no-drive escape'

Sarah’s verdict: ‘While the big-ticket hotels [at Lake Como] such as Villa D’Este and The Mandarin Oriental are knockout for one night, Hilton Lake Como’s low-key luxury makes for a longer no-stress, no-drive escape’

TRAVEL FACTS  

Sarah Hartley was a guest of Hilton Lake Como, where B&B rooms cost from €180 (£150) a night. EasyJet flies to Milan Malpensa from Gatwick, with one-way fares from £29.50. Trains from the airport to Como San Giovanni station cost €16 (£13) return.

From the quay, choose from fast or slow boats that call at stops up and down the lake, passing dozens of jaw-dropping, unimaginably beautiful 16th Century villas. Buy tickets first – you’ll soon be reminded of the Italian style of queuing, so get them early.

Bellagio, arguably the area’s most enchanting town, draws dawdling hordes to its maze of cobbled streets, so for a chilled experience take the slow boat to Torno. Its church and villas are just as romantic, but in low season it’s quiet so you can step on to the quayside at Piazza Casartelli and linger over an aperitivo at the Il Belvedere hotel, or join locals for pizza at Bar Italia next door.

Back in Como, instead of tea, have a gelato before browsing designer boutiques such as Armani and Fendi in the streets surrounding the 14th Century Duomo, which is the real star here. Take time to admire the tombs, paintings and startling blue ceiling which mirrors the blue of the lake. Stroll back for dinner at the glass Terrazza 241 rooftop restaurant and bar, run with brio by Vincenzo. His special creation is the smoking Negroni (don’t try making it at home!), and don’t miss Lago di Como gin served with rosemary and dried orange.

Jaded taste buds will be refreshed with a short menu, including seafood gnocchi with black squid ink. The children’s menu may be predictable, but the pesto pasta and penne al ragu were fine-dining good.

It’s a mellow place to kick back. Live guitar or saxophone add to the low-light vibe at dinner, where couples and families mix easily, although babysitting is offered.

While the big-ticket hotels here such as Villa D’Este and The Mandarin Oriental are knockout for one night, Hilton Lake Como’s low-key luxury makes for a longer no-stress, no-drive escape.



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SR-9 in Zion National Park reopens to standard-size vehicles after rockfall – St George News


A rockfall in Zion National Park west of the Zion-Mount Carmel Tunnel caused the closure of a section of state Route 9, Zion National Park, Utah, Nov. 12, 2021 | Photo courtesy of National Park Service / David Dick, St. George News

SPRINGDALE — After closing Friday morning due to a rockfall in Zion National Park west of the Zion-Mount Carmel Tunnel, State Route 9 has reopened to standard-size vehicles.

Closure of SR-9 in Zion National Park due to a rockfall, Nov. 12, 2021 | Photo courtesy of Zion National Park, St. George News | Click to enlarge

Updated Nov. 12, 4:48 p.m., Information pertaining to the reopening of SR-9 has been added.

According to a press release from park officials, SR-9 reopened to standard-size vehicles at 4:30 p.m. The road will reopen to oversize vehicles at the regularly scheduled time of 8 a.m. on Saturday. The road was closed Friday morning from Canyon Junction to the east end of the Zion-Mount Carmel Tunnel as maintenance workers remove the fallen rock and assess the condition of the road. The rest of the park remained open.

The rockfall did not damage any vehicles or cause any injuries and did not affect the road to Zion Canyon. Visitors could still access Zion Canyon using the park’s shuttle system. Shuttles leave from the park’s South Entrance at the Zion Canyon  Visitor Center in Springdale. Visitors traveling from east of Zion were asked to follow alternate routes to arrive at the park’s South Entrance.

Check the Zion National Park website to see alerts about the status of the road, and follow the park on social media to see photos of the ongoing work.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.





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George scores 24, Clippers beat Blazers to extend win streak


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Paul George has been putting the Los Angeles Clippers on his shoulders the first month of the season. He needed some help Tuesday night after running into foul trouble midway through the third quarter against the Portland Trail Blazers.

Reggie Jackson and Nicolas Batum were able to pick up the slack.

George led the Clippers with 24 points in their 117-109 victory over the Trail Blazers, but Jackson added 23 and Batum scored a season-high 22 points as Los Angeles extended its winning streak to five.

“We just keep being resilient and finding ways to win,” coach Tyron Lue said. “In the timeouts my message was I wanted us to keep our poise. We had to keep playing through it. They held it down until we got Paul back in the game.”

George went to the bench with 5:53 remaining in the third quarter and the Clippers up 70-65. When he came back into the game with 9:55 left in the fourth, LA had extended the lead to 88-82.

Batum and Isaiah Hartenstein keyed the Clippers’ offense during George’s absence with eight points apiece.

“The first two or three possessions we didn’t play well. We weren’t moving the ball,” said Batum, who was 6 of 8 from beyond the arc. “Then we just started to play simple, move around and got open shots. That was a big stretch before Paul came back.”

George, the reigning Western Conference player of the week, played only 33 minutes because of his foul trouble. Despite the decreased playing time, he was near a triple-double with nine rebounds and seven assists.

“So many guys are stepping up when we need them. You never know in a big night who it is going to be. You can’t put enough emphasis on that,” said George, who is fifth in the league in scoring at 26.7 points per game.

Damian Lillard led Portland with 27 points and Norman Powell scored 23. Jusuf Nurkic had 15 points and 13 rebounds for the Trail Blazers, who are winless in their first five road games.

The Clippers had an 83-79 lead going into the fourth quarter before going on a 13-6 run to take control. They would extend the lead to 12 in the final minute.

Blazers coach Chauncey Billups thought his team played well for the first three quarters but became undisciplined in the fourth.

“There is a different level of focus you have to have here and we didn’t get that done,” he said. “We had some shots we couldn’t make late.”

The third meeting between the teams was close compared to the first two. The Clippers won 116-86 on Oct. 25 before the Trail Blazers countered with a 111-92 victory four nights later.

NOT AMUSED

Lillard looked perturbed postgame, mostly about the offseason rule emphasis that has taken away players relying on non-basketball moves to draw fouls.

“I feel like the way the game is being officiated is unacceptable. I don’t want to go too deep into it but the explanations and (stuff) that is getting missed …” he said. “I felt like, coming in, the rule change wouldn’t affect me because I don’t trick the referees. I don’t do the trick plays.”

ROLLERCOASTER FIRST

The Clippers jumped out to a 13-3 lead less than three minutes into the game on the strength of three 3-pointers. The Trail Blazers would rally though and go up by 26-20 on Cody Zeller’s dunk with 3:44 remaining in the period.

LA would score the last 13 points in the period to have a 33-26 advantage after 12 minutes.

TIP-INS

Trail Blazers: The 33 points by LA in the first quarter is the most Portland has allowed in the first 12 minutes this season.

Clippers: Hartenstein came off the bench and scored a season-high 14 points in 17 minutes.

UP NEXT

Trail Blazers: Travel to the Phoenix Suns on Wednesday. Portland won the first meeting 134-105 on Oct. 23.

Clippers: Host the Miami Heat on Thursday. LA has won the last five meetings.

___

More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/hub/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports





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COVID-19 testing site in St. George expands operation hours, adds travel lane


ST. GEORGE, Utah (ABC4) – The state’s only COVID-19 testing site in Southwestern Utah at Dixie Technical College is expanding it’s lanes and operation hours just in time for the holidays.

“We noticed we have a lot of people traveling, the holidays are coming up and we really wanted to make sure people are able to get that done as they are leaving the country, a lot of different countries have different requirements as you’re traveling and they need that negative test,” says Carolina Herrin, the Operations Director for Nomi Health.

Starting Monday, there’s a designated testing lane for those expecting to travel in the coming weeks the only other site like this is at the state’s health department in Salt Lake City.

“On average we do about 400-600 tests a day our travel lane in Salt Lake has done over 1,000 tests and we’ve barely been open for a month not even a full month, so we’re looking to have those numbers increase in St. George as well,” says Herrin.

The testing site is now open from 7 AM to 7 PM, seven days a week. Rapid molecular tests, PCR and rapid antigen tests are available.

“All Utah residents, you can get this service for free, we just need to know you have a boarding pass, or you’re traveling so any type of proof of that, proof of residency and it’s completely free,” says Herrin.

Anyone from out-of-state has to pay a $179 fee for the rapid PCR test, however standard PCR and rapid antigen tests are an option and free of charge.



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Fire engulfs SUV, travel trailer in driveway of Ivins home – St George News


IVINS — What started out as fueling up a sport utility vehicle and a travel trailer in preperation for another traveling adventure ended up becoming a fiery inferno in the driveway for an Ivins resident Wednesday afternoon. 

Santa Clara/Ivins fireighters fight a burning SUV and travel trailer on fire at the driveway of a home on Ridgeview Circle in Ivins, Utah. May 5, 2021 | Photo by Chris Reed, St. George News

The fire, at the home in the cul-de-sac of Ridgeview Circle in Ivins, fully engulfed the SUV and the fifth-wheel trailer and threatened the resident’s home. However, Santa Clara-Ivins firefighters managed to corral the resilient fire utilizing a variety of methods, including fire-retardant foam and the Jaws of Life, which were used to break apart the vehicle to get to the sources of flame. 

While the SUV and travel trailer were total losses, the fire was limited to the driveway despite the back of the combined vehicles being just outside the open garage, which contained a BMW convertible.

“We had our work cut out for us today,” Santa Clara/Ivins Fire and Rescue Chief Randy Hancey said, adding that the firefighters raced to keep other consumables from igniting including two propane tanks between the SUV and trailer, items in the garage and the home itself. “There’s a lot of stuff in there; obviously, that could have gone bad.”

While no injuries were reported, Hancey said there were some initial scary moments for the resident when he first noticed the smoke. 

Hancey said the vehicle owner had just filled his vehicle “all the way up to the max” with gasoline to set out on a trip. Sitting in the driver’s seat, he smelled some smoke. Opening the rear hatch of the SUV, he said he saw smoke come out, which appeared to be emanating from near the fuel spout.

Then, to the owner’s alarm, he noticed the paintwork starting to blister, Hancey said.

Upon arriving to a fire in the driveway of a home on Ridgeview Circle, an SUV and travel trailer were fully engulfed in flames, in Ivins, Utah, May 5, 2021 | Photo courtesy of Santa Clara/Ivins Fire and Rescue, St. George News

By the time firefighters from Santa Clara/Ivins Station 31 arrived, the SUV and the front portion of the travel trailer were fully engulfed in flames, obscuring the vehicles themselves. 

“Initially, we were pretty concerned as …  the trailer caught fire, the garage door is open and it was going in that direction, right from the front of that trailer,” Hancey said. “We didn’t want it to get in the house or into the garage.”

The smell of burning metal, magnesium, gasoline and rubber filled the air as the Station 31 engine was soon joined by two engines and firefighters from Station 32 – as well as support from Santa Clara/Ivins Police, who closed off the street. 

The main combustible was the 26 gallons of gasoline that had just fueled up the SUV. The flames were quelled down into a carpet of flame under the SUV. However, with a lot of fuel to burn, each time firefighters seemed to get an upper hand with water and foam retardant, the flames would come back dancing like a phoenix out of the water below.

“When we’re dealing with the fuel, the vehicle keeps reigniting,” Hancey said. “We were trying to get to it, put foam on it, but there was 26 gallons of fuel.”

To aid in this effort, firefighters utilized the Jaws of Life, tearing apart the hot metal of the SUV like a can. 

A burning SUV and travel trailer at the driveway of a home on Ridgeview Circle in Ivins, Utah. May 5, 2021 | Photo by Chris Reed, St. George News

“That’s so we can get access to the different parts of the vehicle underneath, you know, the tires and the frame and everything right down to the concrete driveway,” Hancey said. 

While the home was threatened, Hancey said none of the neighboring homes were at risk as the fire was contained to the one driveway, though there were some fears of the plentiful gasoline going down the block, as a stream of water went down Ridgeview Circle from the firefighters’ hoses. 

While still under investigation, the resident indicated an electrical short started the fire.

After nearly an hour and a half of work, the fire was put out just after 4 p.m. The SUV was nothing more than jangled metal and the fifth-wheel gutted out. 

But while there would be no travel-trailer trip and a total loss of the vehicles for the resident, the home was untouched by the fire. 

“It was pretty well contained,” Hancey said.

St. George News reporter David Dudley contributed to this story.

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Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.





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Travel through St. George airport rebounds, flights to Texas return amid plans to expand – St George News


ST. GEORGE — Though the pandemic initially gutted travel in and out of the St. George Regional Airport last April by 90%, the number of airline passengers passing through the airport has largely rebounded in the year since thanks to the area being a “hot market” for travelers.

A plane from the Dallas-Fort Worth connection connects with the jet bridge at the St. George Regional Airport, allowing passengers to disembark, as seen from the airport’s observation lounge, St. George, Utah, Sept. 26, 2019 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

“Airlines like our market right now,” Rich Stehmeier, the airport’s general manager, said during a conversation with St. George News during the online 2021 Dixie Regional Transportation Expo held earlier this month.

Just as the airline industry took a hit from the pandemic over the last year, so did the St. George Regional Airport. Passengers dropped by 90% at the lowest point by the end of April as passengers through the airport dropped from 29,000 monthly to 2,900, Stehmeier said.

However, in the months since, passengers through the airport have rebounded by 85%. Stehmeier attributed this to St. George being a “hot market” to visit due to its close proximity to Zion National Park, Snow Canyon State Park and offered other outdoor recreation and activities that had otherwise been restricted in other states due to COVID-19.

“So they can do stuff (here),” Stehmeier said. “That’s been a good, good thing.”

Overall, 180,000 people passed through the airport in 2020 versus the nearly 227,000 that did in 2019.

A graphic of the major destinations offered through the St. George Regional Airport | Graphic courtesy of the St. George Regional Airport, St. George News

Flights that had been shutdown or reduced by the pandemic are also beginning to return.

American Airlines, which currently offers two flights a day out of Phoenix, will soon be adding a third daily flight starting in March. The airline will also restore service to the Dallas-Fort Worth area on Saturdays starting in March, and then daily starting in April.

Flights to Los Angeles remain uncertain, Stehmeier said. Airlines he has spoken to may restore service there to and from St. George in the next six or 12 months. Currently, the situation in California is questionable.

There has been some interest from budget airlines in starting a route to other California locations like San Diego, though Stehmeier said he could not go into further detail on this matter.

In addition to recounting the airport’s rebound thanks to people being drawn to the area, Stehmeier also reviewed the current status of the airport and future projects.

An aerial shot of the St. George Regional Airport taken during one of the area’s pervious air shows, St. George, February, 2014 | Photo courtesy of the St. George Regional Airport, St. George News

The airport sports a 9,300-foot run that is 150-feet wide and accompanied by 50-foot wide taxi-ways, with more room for expansion, Stehmeier said. The 33,500-square foot terminal can also be expanded and upgraded.

Over the next couple of years, there are plans to expand the terminal ramp and bring in three additional jet bridges, which will create seven gates overall for the airport.

Currently, the airport plays host to many different types of aircraft, from private to charter, and commercial to military.

Among the more common aircraft seen at the airport is the CJR200 and 700 passenger jets that each seat between 50 and 78 passengers respectively. These airplanes are able to fly in and out of the airport nonstop.

Larger planes, such as the a Boeing 737 and 757, can also be catered to at the regional airport, though only around three or four times a week, Stehmeier said.

A plane from the Dallas-Fort Worth connection connects with the jet bridge at the St. George Regional Airport, allowing passengers to disembark, St. George, Utah, Sept. 26, 2019 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

However, larger planes, like a Boeing 747, would not be able to use the airport. This is not because of the runway but rather the much smaller taxi-way. The outer engines on the wings of the four-engine 747 would be hanging, not over the concrete of the 50-foot wide taxi-way, but over dirt, which can be sucked up into the engine and cause damage, Stehmeier said.

The airport will also be getting a new aircraft rescue and firetruck as mandated by Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to the age of the airport’s current aircraft rescue/firetruck. The FAA will cover up to 90% of the cost of the new vehicle.

An overview of the airport’s new 20-year master plan was shared during the online transportation expo, along with an online survey of what the public wants related to the airport, said Rich Lucas, the master plan’s project manager.

Under the master plan, planners anticipate the airport continuing to grow in demand and operation. Among future forecasts is the addition of a new regional carrier and possibly the addition of a smaller, “boutique” carrier.

In this September 2019 file photo, St. George Mayor Jon Pike and other city and airport officials welcome passengers disembarking the first flight to the St. George Regional Airport from Dallas-Fort Worth, St. George, Utah, Sept. 26, 2019 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

The regional carrier would feature planes of up to a 70-plus seat capacity, while the boutique service would offer smaller, 9-30 seat planes that would fly out of the airport between one and three times a day.

There are also hopes that the airport will be able to host larger aircraft over the next 20 years, such as the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 on a more regular basis. Both planes will carry either an increased passenger or cargo capacity than the airport currently handles.

It is also estimated that the airport will be able to house up to 260 private aircraft by 2040 over the 177 it presently does.

Continuing expansion and upgrades to the terminal are also planned. In addition to the new ramp and jet bridges that Stehmeier mentioned, Lucas said they are planning to expand the terminal’s holding area, upgrade package screening and bring in food and beverage options beyond the vending machine already there.

While planning for expansions and forecasting, increased activity may seem like an odd thing to do in the pandemic era, Lucas said he believes the continuing activity within Washington County will support it.

“This is one of those more robust markets,” he said. “We’re confident this airport is going to grow.”

As the airport’s master plan is currently under public review. A part of this includes a survey currently hosted on the St. George Regional Airport’s website that the public can fill out regarding the airport’s future.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.





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Prince William and Kate broke royal travel rule for after birth of Prince George | Travel News






Prince William and Kate broke royal travel rule for after birth of Prince George | Travel News | Travel » TechnoCodex




















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Clippers’ Kawhi Leonard, Paul George out due to coronavirus protocols – Orange County Register


The Clippers will have an opportunity to run Tyronn Lue’s adaptability play on Tuesday, when they’ll tip off their first substantial road trip of the season without All-Stars Kawhi Leonard and Paul George – both of whom will be sidelined in accordance with the league’s health and safety protocol.

Neither will be with the team to start its six-game trip, though a league source indicated one or both of them could join the Clippers if they clear the protocols, which were laid out before the season in an extensive 135-page document that is being updated regularly.

Due to player health privacy, it’s unclear exactly which circumstances will cause Leonard and George to stay home to start the trip, but players don’t have to test positive for the coronavirus to have to sit out games.

Patrick Beverley also will miss the start of the trip with right knee soreness that sidelined him at halftime of Sunday’s 108-100 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder at Staples Center.

Tuesday’s game in Atlanta will be the first regular-season game that the Clippers will be without players due to the coronavirus guidelines.

Reggie Jackson missed a preseason game against the Lakers under those health and safety protocols, as did assistant coach Chauncey Billups. Both returned for the next game.

Also, seven Clippers support staffers had to quarantine following a positive coronavirus test in early January, but that didn’t disrupt the Clippers’ on-court business.

Leonard and George have been major components of the Clippers’ early season success: With both in the lineup, the team is 12-2. George is averaging 23.9 points and shooting a career-best 50.4% from the field and 48.4% from 3-point range while averaging 5.4 assists per game, also a career-high. Leonard is scoring 25.9 points and logging a career-best 5.7 assists per game.

PASSING TIME

Pro tip from Oklahoma City’s Mike Muscala: Create a chess.com account.

The Thunder big man said his online matches with former teammate Steven Adams are helping pass the time while Muscala has been stuck in a hotel room on road trips this season, confinement in accordance with those evolving coronavirus health and safety protocols, which limit in-person interaction between even teammates to practices and games.

Following their back-to-back with the Clippers in L.A. on Friday and Sunday, the Thunder have dealt with the league’s heightening restraints on the road for nine of their 15 games this season, with another two games scheduled before they return home.

The Clippers, conversely, headed out Monday for their first substantial road swing of the season, a 10-day trip to the East Coast that starts on Tuesday in Atlanta and concludes Feb. 3 in Cleveland.

Previously, the Clippers (13-4) have been home for 10 of 17 contests (and one of their “road” games was against the Lakers, their Staples Center co-tenants. They haven’t had to play more than two consecutive road games, nor have they had to travel east of Denver.

Now they’ll get the city-by-city, bubble-by-bubble experience.

“We just gotta do what we have to do,” Lue said. “I think the guys are finding things to do, things to keep them busy and occupied, but also having time to bond and communicate, and they’ve been doing that the best we can.

“This is gonna be our first trip where it’s pretty extensive, I think 10-11 days, we gotta just kinda see how they react and things we do to make it fun and guys can enjoy one another.”

If not chess, then there are other many other gaming options the Clippers will employ, forward Patrick Patterson said.



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