Never Leave a Hotel Before You Check Out — Best Life


Technology has streamlined and improved many of the old conventions of traveling. These days, you don’t even have to carry around a printed boarding pass—and you certainly don’t have to safeguard your money on the road with traveler’s cheques. But there’s one longstanding travel protocol that you should keep doing even though you don’t technically have to. Read on to find out what you should never leave a hotel without doing, according to the experts.

RELATED: Never Forget to Do This Before Going to Bed in a Hotel Room, Expert Warns.

hotel front desk with woman in background
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These days, hotels make the checkout process easy. You can just toss or recycle your electronic room key cards, and then just walk right out of the hotel without ever formally undertaking a checkout process. But Brandon Berksonhotel expert and founder of the curated boutique lodging guide Hotels Above Par, says you should always go through the process of checking out, whether digitally or in person at the desk.

RELATED: Marriott Customers Are Outraged That the Hotel Chain Is Doing This.

Businesswoman at reception, paying for hotel room.
iStock

Since you’ve provided your credit card information at or before check-in, you can technically just walk out and the hotel will push all the final charges through to your credit card. But that’s the problem, Berkson warns: If you don’t check out, you won’t know what those charges are in advance—and you won’t have a chance to dispute them if something looks wrong.

Rear view of tourist in the hotel room pulling the curtains to see the view
iStock

When you check out of a hotel, you get a chance to review the charges individually and make sure that everything looks accurate. “Checking out is important,” notes Berkson. “There have been a few times where I was charged the wrong amount—shoutout to the minbar sensors wrongly detecting that I took something.”

It’s also a chance to negotiate the bill under certain circumstances. Say you didn’t feel the room was as advertised, or the service fell well below any reasonable expectations. Checking out is your chance to ask if they’ll make it right by giving you a price break, or tossing in a freebie.

Another pro tip: Checking out of an international hotel allows you to ask for the bill in local currency, which is likely to be a much better deal for you in the end than a foreign bill issued in U.S. dollars due to conversion rates.

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man scanning his key card on his hotel room door
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Aside from dollars and cents, checking out of a hotel is just the courteous thing to do, especially at a time when staffing shortages are causing huge disruptions across a heavily impacted travel and hospitality industry. “This is the way housekeeping knows your room is clear for the next guest, something especially relevant during the pandemic when staff need to harness in on further disinfecting surfaces, laundry, and restocking necessities,” Berkson says.

RELATED: A Hotel Worker is Rating Celebs Based on How Rude They Are.



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Online Travel Update: South Korean Regulators Re-examine OTA Practices; Cruise Bookings Move Online; Fairfly Plans To Offer Hotel Solution – Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment



United States:

Online Travel Update: South Korean Regulators Re-examine OTA Practices; Cruise Bookings Move Online; Fairfly Plans To Offer Hotel Solution


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Our cruise industry friends make an appearance in this
week’s Update, one of their first appearances in some time.
Enjoy.

South Korean Regulators Re-Examine OTA Practices

(“Online hotel booking sites to come under heightened
scrutiny from South Korean regulator,” October 28, 2021 via
MLEX Insight) (subscription may be required)


By now, readers are well aware of South Korea’s previous
investigation into the major online travel agencies (OTAs)’
contracting practices (specifically, rate parity requirements) and
the resulting “corrections” announced by OTAs (Booking.com, Agoda,
Expedia and

By now, readers are well aware of South Korea’s previous
investigation into the major online travel agencies (OTAs)’
contracting practices (specifically, rate parity requirements) and
the resulting “corrections” announced by OTAs
(Booking.com, Agoda, Expedia and Hotels.com) earlier this year. These
corrections mirror the compromises reached in several other
countries where OTAs agreed to remove availability and indirect
channel rate parity, but retained direct channel parity
requirements (e.g., hoteliers must continue to provide OTAs with
rates equal to or better than the rates on the hoteliers’ own
websites). With the travel industry expected to rebound quickly in
Korea as the threat of COVID subsides, the Korea Fair Trade
Commission (KFTC) announced last week plans to re-examine the
OTAs’ current contracting practices and their effect on the
market. Separately, the KFTC announced that an investigation into
OTAs’ advertising practices, specifically whether OTAs provide
adequate notice regarding display advertising’s effects on sort
order, was already underway.

Cruise Moves Online

(“Online cruise bookings leave many travel advisors
behind,” October 27, 2021 via PhocusWire)


For years I’ve asked our cruise industry clients why the
industry was slow to move more of their bookings online (relying
instead on traditional offline distribution channels). While the
answers varied, the most common response I received was that the
complexity of cruise offerings (e.g., hundreds of cabin types,
rates, etc.) made it difficult for most travelers to book online.
Times may be changing. In a recorded video to travel advisors,
Royal Caribbean Group CEO, Richard Fain, reported that while demand
for the company’s cruise offerings was rebounding, the revival
was coming largely through online channels. Is this simply because
of travelers’ reaction to moving their other purchases online
during COVID? A reflection of the massive layoffs that occurred at
travel agents and advisors? For an industry that has relied so
heavily through the years on travel agents and advisors, this will
be an interesting trend to watch.  

Fairfly to Offer Hotel Solution

(“FairFly to Debut Hotel Solution,” October 25,
2021 via Business Travel News)


Last week, re-shopping platform, Fairfly,
announced that it would be launching a hotel re-shopping platform
in early 2022. The platform will allow Fairfly clients to reshop
(e.g., automated cancellation of current bookings and rebooking at
lower available rates) their hotel bookings through the
platform’s use of multi-channel data and artificial
intelligence. Hotel rate benchmarking and other tools will also be
made available to clients. Fairfly’s announcement comes at a
time where other similar fintech-backed travel products and
services (i.e. Hopper‘s airfare and room rate
freezes) are garnering much of the industries’ attention.

Other news:

Marriott to Adopt a Dynamic Pricing System
for Bonvoy Loyalty Program


October 26, 2021 via TravelWeekly

Starting early next year, Marriott will move to dynamic pricing
for its Bonvoy rewards redemption rates, the company announced.
Dynamic pricing – setting flexible prices for products or services
based on market demands – has been used to boost profits for a
range of industries from sporting-event tickets to rideshare
services.

Trivago and China’s Huawei Partner for
Smartphone Company’s Paid Search


October 26, 2021 via Skift Travel News (subscription may be
required)


The Trivago-Huawei deal is one of several that Trivago is piloting
where it provides backend services to business partners. These
could develop one day into a material revenue stream for the German
company.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general
guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought
about your specific circumstances.

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The Legal Implications Of Social Media Marketing In 2021

Klein Moynihan Turco LLP

Social media platforms have become an increasingly common forum for social interactions around the globe. To illustrate their burgeoning popularity, Facebook, alone, garners about 1.9 billion unique daily users.

Tech & Telecom Weekly – November 8, 2021

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Welcome to the Tech & Telecom Weekly, an e-newsletter keeping you apprised of the latest developments in the telecommunications and high-tech industries.



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STR: October U.S. Hotel Metrics Up From September


The U.S. hotel industry resumed its recovery in October, with key performance metrics showing improvement from September’s numbers, STR reported.

October 2021 U.S. hotel occupancy was 62.9 percent compared with 61.2 percent for September. The October figure is 8.8 percent below October 2019 levels. October average daily rate was $134.78, up from $133.11 last month and up 1.2 percent from 2019 rates. Revenue per available room was $84.75, a 7.6 percent decline from 2019, but an improvement from September’s $82.04.

None of the top 25 markets reported higher occupancy in October 2021 than October 2019. The top 25 markets did report higher ADR than all other markets, according to STR.

Nashville had the highest occupancy level at 71.8 percent, still down 11.9 percent from the 2019 benchmark. Boston (70.6 percent) and Los Angeles (70.2 percent) were the only other markets with occupancy levels higher than 70 percent. Only Oahu Island reported occupancy below 50 percent, at 48.9 percent.

STR and Tourism Economics earlier this month boosted their forecast, moving up their projected full U.S. hotel industry recovery to late 2022 for demand and ADR, and from 2024 to 2023 for RevPAR, at least in nominal terms. With inflation taken into consideration, real ADR and RevPAR won’t fully recover until 2025.

RELATED: September U.S. Hotel Metrics Dip Again Despite Group Bump



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Organizing expert reveals three hacks that will make your next hotel stay more comfortable


SLEEPING at hotels and away from the comfort of your own home isn’t always ideal. 

However,  an organization expert has revealed three hacks that will help travelers be more comfortable during their next hotel stay.

An organization expert has revealed her tips for being on the road

3

An organization expert has revealed her tips for being on the roadCredit: TikTok @neat.caroline
The expert uses items already in the hotel room to make the room meet her needs

3

The expert uses items already in the hotel room to make the room meet her needsCredit: TikTok @neat.caroline

A professional organizer named Caroline shared a video to her TikTok page that shows travelers exactly how to utilize their hotel room to its fullest extent.

“If you’re low on outlets, look in the back of your TV for an extra USB port,” she advised before showing followers that the TV can be used to charge a phone.

“If you wanna work, but you don’t wanna sit at a desk, use your ironing board as a standing desk,” the expert noted for her second tip. 

Sure enough, she was able to adjust her ironing board to the perfect height that made standing while working on her laptop easy and comfortable.

For her third and final tip, Caroline told people to use the clips on the hangers that come in the hotel closet to keep shades or current closed. 

“Now you can sleep in!” she enthusiastically noted.

If you’re keen to be up to date with the latest travel hacks and tips, there are plenty of travel and organizing experts that have shared their knowledge on the internet. 

A woman previously shared that if you are flying in a plane without a television, you can hang your phone from the back of the seat to mimic the experience of having a TV. 

A flight attendant also shared her three tips for staying at hotels. 

First, she said to never use the provided glassware.

“The reason being, you don’t know if they were cleaned properly or just rinsed out from the last people who stayed in that hotel room,” she explained.

She also suggested bringing a clear plastic bag to wrap the TV remote in for sanitary purposes.

And for those who don’t get a complimentary breakfast, she said the coffee machine can be used to heat water for oatmeal.

These hacks will make any hotel visit more comfortable

3

These hacks will make any hotel visit more comfortableCredit: TikTok @neat.caroline

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Is Putting Hotel Luggage in the Bathtub Upon Arrival a Good Idea?


Since at least August 2021, online advertisements have displayed a photograph of a purported hotel trick regarding placing luggage in the bathtub. The ads appeared to promise to explain why suitcases would need to go in such a seemingly odd spot. For example, this ad appeared next to an article on the 10news.com website. It read: “Hotel Tricks: Luggage Goes in the Bathtub ASAP.”

An ad promised a hotel trick for luggage going in the bath tub ASAP.
This ad was hosted by what is known as the Outbrain advertising network.

We clicked the ad. It led to a lengthy slideshow article on the Definition.org website about supposed “hacks” for hotel rooms. The headline read: “The Ingenious Hotel Hacks You Need To Pack In Your Bag.”

The story never ended up mentioning anything about placing luggage in a hotel room’s bathtub. We clicked through 30 pages of nonsense so our readers wouldn’t have to. It was nothing but clickbait, just like another ad we reported about that involved an empty toilet paper roll.

While the 30-page article mentioned nothing about luggage in a hotel bathtub, a little bit of research led us to find out that it can have a legitimate purpose.

Educators at Penn State University, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, and The University of Maine, all recommend placing luggage in the bathtub when checking into a hotel room. Some suggest it’s also fine to temporarily leave the suitcases in the hallway.

The reason given is simple: bedbugs.

 
The experts on bedbugs that appear in videos like these don’t necessarily recommend that all hotel guests always put their luggage in the bathtub. Rather, if guests are fearful of bedbugs, it’s a safe place to store suitcases, purses, and other belongings, while they search the room for pests. An infestation can prove to be quite the costly situation.

The chances of a hotel room having bedbugs is small, just like the size of the creatures. According to Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann, an urban entomologist at Cornell University, “public awareness skyrocketed” to levels beyond the actual chances of experiencing a bedbug infestation. This appeared to be due to a surge in news reports, which perhaps made the issue look like a larger problem than it actually is. Gangloff-Kaufmann was cited in a 2013 story from National Geographic.

The unsanitary nature of placing suitcase wheels in a place where people are meant to bathe themselves may not sound like a good idea. However, fearful hotel guests can simply bring a large trash bag when they travel, so they can lay it down in the tub to keep the surface clean for several minutes. Many brands of trash bags can be torn open on both sides to completely open the plastic, resulting in a longer plastic surface for the bathtub.

An ad promised a hotel trick for luggage going in the bath tub ASAP.
A bedbug. (Courtesy: AJC1/Flickr)

Once guests have checked the room for bedbugs, including all around the bedding, mattress, box spring, and frame, as well as under and around the straps on luggage racks, it’s recommended to place the suitcases directly on the rack. It is not recommended to keep suitcases on the floor or the bed. Multiple pest control articles have mentioned that placing luggage on the hotel room’s floor or directly on the bed could result in bringing home a bedbug infestation, however minuscule the chances of such a thing might be.

The idea of placing luggage in a bathtub wasn’t the first time we saw what, at first, appeared to be odd hotel “hacks” and “tricks.” For example, an ad claimed that there was some grand reason why hotel guests should “always” put coins in the bathroom sink. We also reported on an ad that purportedly revealed an important tip on why guests should “always” put a towel under their hotel door.

For a full rundown of how to check for bedbugs upon arrival to a hotel room, check out a full guide from BobVila.com.

Note: The bed bug photograph is credited to AJC1 on Flickr.

Snopes debunks a wide range of content, and online advertisements are no exception. Misleading ads often lead to obscure websites that host lengthy slideshow articles with lots of pages. It’s called advertising “arbitrage.” The advertiser’s goal is to make more money on ads displayed on the slideshow’s pages than it cost to show the initial ad that lured them to it. Feel free to submit ads to us, and be sure to include a screenshot of the ad and the link to where the ad leads.



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Travel news: Get engaged at an iconic landmark, find Canada's best restaurants, raise a glass at Toronto's historic hotel bar – GuelphMercury.com



Travel news: Get engaged at an iconic landmark, find Canada’s best restaurants, raise a glass at Toronto’s historic hotel bar  GuelphMercury.com



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The ‘floating hotel’ rusting away in North Korea


(CNN) — It was once an exclusive five-star resort floating directly over Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Today, it sits dilapidated in a North Korean port, a 20-minute drive from the Demilitarized Zone, the restricted area that separates the two Koreas.

For the world’s first floating hotel, that’s the last stop in a bizarre 10,000-mile journey that began over 30 years ago with glamorous helicopter rides and fine dining, but ended with a tragedy.

Now marked for demolition, this rusty vessel with a colorful past faces an uncertain future.

A night at the Reef

The floating hotel was designed as a luxury stopover for divers.

The floating hotel was designed as a luxury stopover for divers.

Peter Charlesworth/LightRocket via Getty Images

The floating hotel was the brainchild of Doug Tarca, an Italian-born professional diver and entrepreneur living in Townsville, on the northeastern coast of Queensland, Australia.

“He had much love and appreciation for the Great Barrier Reef,” says Robert de Jong, a curator at the Townsville Maritime Museum. In 1983, Tarca started a company, Reef Link, to ferry day-trippers via catamaran from Townsville to a reef formation off the coast.

“But then he said: ‘Hang on. What about letting people stay on the reef overnight?'”

Initially, Tarca thought of mooring old cruise ships permanently to the reef, but realized it would be cheaper and more environmentally friendly to design and build a custom floating hotel instead. Construction began in 1986 at Singapore’s Bethlehem shipyard, a subsidiary of a now defunct large US steel company.

The hotel cost an estimated $45 million — over $100 million in today’s money — and was transported by a heavy-lift ship to the John Brewer Reef, its chosen location within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

“It’s a horseshoe-shaped reef, with quiet waters in the center, so ideal for a floating hotel,” says de Jong.

The hotel was secured to the ocean floor with seven huge anchors, positioned in such a way that they wouldn’t damage the reef. No sewage was pumped overboard, water was recirculated and any trash was taken away to a site on the mainland, somewhat limiting the environmental impact of the structure.

Christened the Four Seasons Barrier Reef Resort, it officially opened for business on March 9, 1988.

“It was a five-star hotel and it wasn’t cheap,” says de Jong. “It had 176 rooms and could accommodate 350 guests. There was a nightclub, two restaurants, a research lab, a library and a shop where you could buy diving gear. There was even a tennis court, although I think most of the tennis balls probably ended up in the Pacific.”

A whisky bottle

The hotel didn't cope well with bad weather, with guests often left stranded.

The hotel didn’t cope well with bad weather, with guests often left stranded.

Townsville Maritime Museum

Getting to the hotel required either a two-hour ride on a fast catamaran, or a much quicker helicopter ride — also more expensive, at an inflation-adjusted $350 per round trip.

The novelty of it all generated quite a buzz at first, and the hotel was a dream for divers. Even non-divers could enjoy incredible views of the reef, thanks to a special submersible called The Yellow Submarine.

However, it soon became clear that the impact of bad weather on guests had been underestimated.

“If the weather was rough and you had to go back to town to catch a plane, the helicopter couldn’t fly and the catamaran couldn’t sail, so that caused a lot of inconveniences,” says de Jong.

Interestingly, hotel staff lived on the top floor, which in a floating hotel is the least desirable location because it swings around the most. According to de Jong, staffers used an empty whisky bottle hanging from the ceiling to gauge the roughness of the sea: when it started to sway out of control, they knew a lot of guests would be seasick.

“That was probably one of the reasons why the hotel was never really a commercial success,” he says.

There were other problems: a cyclone struck the structure just one week before opening, damaging beyond repair a freshwater pool that was part of the complex. A World War II ammunition dump was found two miles from the hotel, scaring off some customers. And there wasn’t really much to do besides diving or snorkeling.

After just one year, the Four Seasons Barrier Reef Resort had become too expensive to run, and closed down without ever having reached full occupancy.

“It disappeared really quietly,” says de Jong, “And it was sold to a company in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, which was looking to attract tourists.”

An unlikely destination

08 floating hotel gallery 11092021

After failure off the coast of the Great Barrier Reef, it spent a year in Vietnam, then moved to North Korea.

Hyundai Asan Corporation

In 1989 the floating hotel embarked on its second journey, this time 3,400 miles northward. Renamed Saigon Hotel — but more colloquially known as “The Floater” — it remained moored in the Saigon River for almost a decade.

“It became really successful, and I think the reason was that it was not in the middle of nowhere but on a waterfront. It was floating, but it was connected to the mainland,” says de Jong.

In 1998, however, The Floater ran out of steam financially and closed down. But instead of being dismantled, it found an unlikely new lease of life: it was purchased by North Korea to attract tourists to Mount Kumgang, a scenic area near the border with South Korea.

“At that time, the two Koreas were trying to build bridges, they were talking to each other. But many hotels in North Korea weren’t really tourist friendly,” says de Jong.

After another 2,800-mile journey, the floating hotel was ready for its third adventure, with the new name of Hotel Haegumgang. It opened in October 2000 and was managed by a South Korean company, Hyundai Asan, which also operated other facilities in the area and offered packages for South Korean tourists.

Over the years, the Mount Kumgang region has attracted over 2 million tourists, according to Hyundai Asan spokesman Park Sung-uk.

“Also, Mount Kumgang Tour improved inter-Korean reconciliation and served as a pivotal point for inter-Korean exchange, as the center for the reunion of separated families to heal the sorrows from national division,” he says.

A tragedy

10 floating hotel gallery 11092021

It’s thought access to the hotel was restricted to North Korea’s political elite.

Hyundai Asan Corporation

In 2008, a North Korean soldier shot and killed a 53-year-old South Korean woman who had wandered beyond the boundaries of the Mount Kumgang tourist area and into a military zone. As a result, Hyundai Asan suspended all tours, and Hotel Haegumgang shut down along with everything else.

It’s unclear whether the hotel has operated at all since then, but certainly not for tourists from South Korea.

“Information is sketchy, but I believe the hotel was operating only for members of the North Korean ruling party,” says de Jong. On Google Maps, it can still be seen moored at a pier in the Mount Kumgang area, rusting away.
In 2019, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un visited the Mount Kumgang tourist area and criticized many of the facilities, including Hotel Haegumgang, for being shabby; he ordered the demolition of many of them as part of a plan to redesign the area to a style more fitting to North Korean culture. But then, the pandemic happened and all plans were put on hold. It’s unclear whether the plan to demolish everything will go through anytime soon, or at all.

In the meantime, the floating hotel lives another day, its legacy still intact. It will likely remain one of a kind, as the idea of floating hotels hasn’t really caught on.

Or — in a sense — it has.

“The ocean is full of floating hotels,” says de Jong. “They’re just called cruise ships.”



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Global Hotel Groups Form Sustainability Initiative


Multiple international hotel companies have joined together to announce an initiative to set a common definition of hotel sustainability “to drive responsible travel and tourism,” according to a statement from Radisson Hotel Group, which is part of the founding group.

Dubbed the Basic Sustainability framework, the initiative aims to “deliver a common starting point for hotel sustainability accessible to all hotel actors worldwide.” The framework is in its development phase and in the coming months the companies will work with the World Travel & Tourism Council, the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance and other key travel industry stakeholders to finalize sustainability actions “with demonstrable positive impact” and share tools and best practices “to ensure all hotels start on a pathway toward the targets of the COP 21 Paris Accord.” Plans are to launch in March 2022.

The framework works as a complement to the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance’s Pathway to Net Positive Hospitality, announced Nov. 3, which aims to enable every hotel “to improve their impact, whatever their starting point on their sustainability journey.” It will encompass four stages and tools to guide the industry toward a “regenerative impact on our planet.” It, too, aims to announce further details in March 2022.

Additional participating hotel companies in the Basic Sustainability framework include Accor; Barceló Hotel Group; Huazhu and its affiliate Deutsche Hospitality; Indian Hotels Company Ltd.; Louvre Hotels and Jin Jiang Hotels, owned by Radisson parent Jin Jiang International; Meliá Hotels International; and Minor Hotels, including its NH Hotel Group. 



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Online Travel Update: South Korean regulators re-examine OTA practices; cruise bookings move online; Fairfly plans to offer hotel solution | Foster Garvey PC


Our cruise industry friends make an appearance in this week’s Update, one of their first appearances in some time. Enjoy.

South Korean Regulators Re-Examine OTA Practices
(“Online hotel booking sites to come under heightened scrutiny from South Korean regulator,” October 28, 2021 via MLEX Insight) (subscription may be required)
By now, readers are well aware of South Korea’s previous investigation into the major online travel agencies (OTAs)’ contracting practices (specifically, rate parity requirements) and the resulting “corrections” announced by OTAs (Booking.com, Agoda, Expedia and Hotels.com) earlier this year. These corrections mirror the compromises reached in several other countries where OTAs agreed to remove availability and indirect channel rate parity, but retained direct channel parity requirements (e.g., hoteliers must continue to provide OTAs with rates equal to or better than the rates on the hoteliers’ own websites). With the travel industry expected to rebound quickly in Korea as the threat of COVID subsides, the Korea Fair Trade Commission (KFTC) announced last week plans to re-examine the OTAs’ current contracting practices and their effect on the market. Separately, the KFTC announced that an investigation into OTAs’ advertising practices, specifically whether OTAs provide adequate notice regarding display advertising’s effects on sort order, was already underway.

Cruise Moves Online
(“Online cruise bookings leave many travel advisors behind,” October 27, 2021 via PhocusWire)
For years I’ve asked our cruise industry clients why the industry was slow to move more of their bookings online (relying instead on traditional offline distribution channels). While the answers varied, the most common response I received was that the complexity of cruise offerings (e.g., hundreds of cabin types, rates, etc.) made it difficult for most travelers to book online. Times may be changing. In a recorded video to travel advisors, Royal Caribbean Group CEO, Richard Fain, reported that while demand for the company’s cruise offerings was rebounding, the revival was coming largely through online channels. Is this simply because of travelers’ reaction to moving their other purchases online during COVID? A reflection of the massive layoffs that occurred at travel agents and advisors? For an industry that has relied so heavily through the years on travel agents and advisors, this will be an interesting trend to watch.  

Fairfly to Offer Hotel Solution
(“FairFly to Debut Hotel Solution,” October 25, 2021 via Business Travel News)
Last week, re-shopping platform, Fairfly, announced that it would be launching a hotel re-shopping platform in early 2022. The platform will allow Fairfly clients to reshop (e.g., automated cancellation of current bookings and rebooking at lower available rates) their hotel bookings through the platform’s use of multi-channel data and artificial intelligence. Hotel rate benchmarking and other tools will also be made available to clients. Fairfly’s announcement comes at a time where other similar fintech-backed travel products and services (i.e. Hopper’s airfare and room rate freezes) are garnering much of the industries’ attention.


Other news:

Marriott to Adopt a Dynamic Pricing System for Bonvoy Loyalty Program
October 26, 2021 via TravelWeekly
Starting early next year, Marriott will move to dynamic pricing for its Bonvoy rewards redemption rates, the company announced. Dynamic pricing – setting flexible prices for products or services based on market demands – has been used to boost profits for a range of industries from sporting-event tickets to rideshare services.

Trivago and China’s Huawei Partner for Smartphone Company’s Paid Search
October 26, 2021 via Skift Travel News (subscription may be required)
The Trivago-Huawei deal is one of several that Trivago is piloting where it provides backend services to business partners. These could develop one day into a material revenue stream for the German company.



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New Europe hotel chain debuts: Travel Weekly


The new British hotel chain Quartz Inn Hotels & Resorts was unveiled at the WTM trade show in London on Nov. 3.

The chain is made up of independent and sustainable hotels, owned and operated by their owners, according to managing director Ignacio Merino.

The idea is to facilitate access to the latest hotel technology for those independent hotels that do not have sufficient means to compete with the large hotel chains, he said.

The brand will also formalize the standards of service, safety, hygiene and sustainability, while preserving the character of each establishment.

“The expansion plans of our company are to end 2022 with over 100 affiliated hotels throughout Europe,” Merino said.

“We want to promote direct sales for our hotels and contribute to creating a more sustainable tourism industry, maintaining the local cultures, reducing energy and water use and eliminating single-use plastic in the rooms.”

Unlike other franchise models, properties do not pay entrance or monthly fees. Quartz Inn Hotels handles all sales, marketing, online reputation and sustainability standards for a minimum percentage of the sales.



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