Holiday travel tips – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


This holiday season many people will be opting to travel for the first time since the pandemic.

Meggan Kaiser, travel expert & author, joined us today to help navigate the busiest travel season in years

For more information, visit, tipsontv.com.

THIS SEGMENT IS SPONSORED BY ORAL-B, LIFE EXTENSION AND PRICELINE.COM.



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Travel picks up at Indy Airport – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — There were scattered flight delays Sunday, which Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officials said was one of the busiest days for travel before the COVID-19 pandemic.

An estimated 38,000 people were in town for the Bands of America competition.

David Eyler attended a percussionists convention happening at the same time.

“We had groups come in from South Carolina, from Texas, all around the country,” said Eyler.

He was preparing to board a flight to Minneapolis, where he will connect to Fargo, North Dakota.

“Just getting through security wasn’t as bad as I thought. I’ve heard maybe some people have had problems and maybe some airports have had long lines,” he said.

The TSA says that although business travel isn’t where it was before the pandemic, airports are starting to get busy.

“We’re seeing a much larger number of leisure travelers — people who have not traveled much in the last year and a half. Those are people who are not as familiar with those checkpoint etiquette procedures,” said TSA Spokesperson Jessica Mayle.

Mayle encourages travelers to review a list of TSA-approved items that you can bring through security before you get to the airport.

Some airlines are short-staffed, and that combined with potential severe weather could ground some people’s travel plans.

Ethan Anderson got to the airport extra early for his flight to Virginia only to discover his plane to Washington, D.C., was delayed.

“My layover from D.C. to Norfolk is a little close — I’m going to be cutting it a little close,” said Anderson.

The TSA says passenger volume should get to about 95% of where it was before the pandemic.



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Busy travel weekend expected at IND, long lines continuing through holidays – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Airport officials are anticipating a busy travel weekend at Indianapolis International Airport following the Bands of America Grand National Championships that brought 39,000 people into Indianapolis. It’s expected that the travel spike will continue through the holidays.

Airport officials are reminding travelers to arrive early, pack smart and plan ahead as TSA anticipates 16,000 people from that band competition to come through Indianapolis International Airport on Sunday alone to travel home. They expect Sunday morning to be the busiest day this weekend.

“I just talked to our Indianapolis team, and the elevated travel volumes have started. So I would say anytime you are traveling now through the holidays you can expect those long lines everyday,” Jessica Mayle with TSA Great Lakes Region said.

Matt Lowe and his daughter were headed to Virginia for a softball tournament.

“I didn’t really know what to expect so we are here, like, way early — like, three hours,” Lowe said.

Not everyone is having such a smooth travel experience. Chrystal Mukendi and her friends were planning to head to Las Vegas on Friday night. They arrived an hour before their flight was scheduled to leave.

“Once I checked in, or was attempting to check my luggage in, I was told that American Airlines system shuts off at a certain point and so it was entirely too late for us to check our luggage in,” Mukendi said.

Friday night, the lines weren’t too bad at the airport — but come Saturday morning, when Mukendi and her friends will be boarding their new flight, that is expected to change.

“I am going to make sure I am here like two to two-and-a-half hours early,” Mukendi said.

“The busy times of day in Indianapolis are 5 to 7 a.m. So definitely if you are getting one of those first flights of the day, you can anticipate having a longer line versus someone who is leaving later in the afternoon,” Mayle said.

Travel has been on the rise nationally since since more people have been getting vaccinated and travel restrictions have been lifted.

Indianapolis is expecting pre-pandemic level travel this holiday season.

“Right now we are seeing travel volumes at Indianapolis at about 95% of those 2019 levels. There are certainly individual days where we are exceeding 2019,” Mayle said.

Because of the rise specifically in leisure travel, TSA is reminding people to arrive early for their flights, wear a mask and double-check the TSA website to make sure you aren’t bringing any prohibited items to ensure the smoothest travel experience possible.

“The best thing that you can do as a passenger to keep that line moving is to not bring anything in your bag that is going to trigger an alarm,” Mayle said.

TSA says that, on average, arriving two hours before your flight is set to take off is enough time at Indianapolis international to have a smooth travel experience.



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Huskies Continue Road Trip Friday at Indiana


DEKALB, Ill. – Following its season-opening victory at Washington, the Northern Illinois University men’s basketball team is on the road again on Friday night, Nov. 12, when the Huskies travel to Indiana to meet the Hoosiers in Bloomington. Game time against Indiana is set for 6 p.m. CT and will be available via Big Ten Network Plus. 

Trendon Hankerson (Novi, Mich./Novi) scored a game-high 28 points on 9-of-15 shooting, including a career-best 6-of-11 from three-point range, in NIU’s 71-64 victory over Washington. Anthony Crump (Novi, Mich./Novi) posted his first career double-double with 11 points and a career-best 11 rebounds. He also had a career-best, and game-high, six assists.

NIU’s victory in Seattle was its first all-time against a Pac-12 opponent and its first over a “high-major” foe since knocking off Kansas State, 75-70, in overtime on Dec. 20, 2005, in DeKalb. With the win, first-year Huskie head coach became the first NIU head coach to win his debut since Tom Jorgensen defeated Wisconsin-Whitewater, 109-83, on Dec. 1, 1966.

The Huskies recorded a school record 14 blocks in the win over Washington, bettering the previous high of 12 set on Feb. 4, 1991, against Western Illinois. Chinedu Kingsley Okanu (Lynwood, Ill./Vincennes University) led the way with a career-high four blocks. 

Friday’s matchup is just the fifth all-time between the Huskies and Hoosiers, with the last being one of the most famous games in NIU history as the Huskies topped fifth-ranked Indiana, 85-71, on Jan. 4, 1972, at Chick Evans Field House. The win was NIU’s first over a ranked opponent in program history, as Jim Bradley led the way with 24 points with 20 rebounds. Billy Harris added 18 points for the Huskies and Larry Jackson scored 17 with 10 rebounds.

This season’s Hoosiers will be playing their second consecutive Mid-American Conference opponent as Indiana opened with a 68-62 victory over Eastern Michigan on Tuesday (Nov. 9). Trayce Jackson-Davis scored a game-high 21 points and grabbed 14 rebounds to pace the Hoosiers against EMU, Xavier Johnson added 14 points. 

Following Friday’s contest, NIU will be back in action on Thursday, Nov. 18, as the Huskies travel to Missouri. Tip time against the Tigers is slated for 7 p.m. on SEC Network Plus. 

Season tickets for the 2021-22 basketball season are on sale now beginning at just $80 for Huskieland general admission tickets in sections 115-118 (minimum of four tickets required to purchase). Reserved season tickets for Huskie men’s basketball are available for $120. Season tickets can be purchased online at NIUHuskies.com/MyHuskies or by calling the NIU Athletics Ticket Office at 815-753-PACK (7225). Courtside and Nelson Club premium ticket options are also available through the Huskie Athletic Fund or by calling, 815-753-1923. NIU will host Eastern Illinois in its regular season home opener on Wednesday, Dec. 1.

 



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Indiana coronavirus COVID-19 updates Sunday November 7, 2021


The latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic from Sunday, Nov. 7, 2021.

INDIANAPOLIS — Here are Sunday’s latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic, including the latest news on COVID-19 vaccinations and testing in Indiana.

Registrations for the vaccine are now open for Hoosiers 5 and older through the Indiana State Department of Health. This story will be updated over the course of the day with more news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

RELATED: Booster shots: Which one to get and who qualifies?

RELATED: Far from ‘back to normal’: Go inside the ICU as Indiana frontline medical workers continue the fight against COVID-19

Latest US, world numbers

There have been more than 46.46 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States as of 5:30 a.m. Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins University. There have been more than 754,270 deaths recorded in the U.S.

Worldwide, there have been more than 249.62 million confirmed coronavirus cases with more than 5.04 million deaths and more than 7.23 billion vaccine doses administered worldwide.


For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness like pneumonia, or death.

Foreign citizens seek US-approved shots as travel resumes

The United States is about to reopen to fully vaccinated foreign travelers. And citizens of other countries who received shots widely used in other parts of the world are scrambling to get reinoculated with U.S.-approved jabs. 

The U.S. will implement a new air travel policy Monday to allow in foreign citizens who have completed a course of a vaccine approved by the Food and Drug Administration or the World Health Organization. That leaves people in Mexico, Hungary, Russia and elsewhere who received the non-approved Russian Sputnik V vaccine or the China-produced CanSino vaccine ineligible to board U.S.-bound flights. 

Some travelers are actively seeking out Western-approved shots so they can travel freely.

Appeals court stays vaccine mandate on larger businesses

 A federal appeals court on Saturday temporarily halted the Biden administration’s vaccine requirement for businesses with 100 or more workers.

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted an emergency stay of the requirement by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration that those workers be vaccinated by Jan. 4 or face mask requirements and weekly tests.

The 5th Circuit, based in New Orleans, said it was delaying the federal vaccine requirement because of potential “grave statutory and constitutional issues” raised by the plaintiffs. The government must provide an expedited reply to the motion for a permanent injunction Monday, followed by petitioners’ reply on Tuesday.



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Be prepared for flight cancellations to spoil holiday travel – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Passengers have come to expect canceled flights over the past few weeks from multiple airlines.

Indianapolis International Airport has been no exception to the travel chaos, which comes as many Hoosiers prepare to travel for the holidays.

Two flights were canceled at IND on Wednesday and four were canceled on Tuesday, according to Flight Aware.

On Sunday nationally, American Airlines canceled more than 600 fights, including half of their flights scheduled in Indianapolis.

This unpredictability has Hoosier passengers worried as they make their holiday travel plans.

Corey Nickel travels a lot for her job. On Wednesday, she was departing for Texas on her third work trip in the last few weeks. “I have been flying a lot of Delta. This is my first Southwest flight in quite some time. … Mainly because I stopped hearing about their cancellations,” Nickel said.

Over the last month, Southwest has canceled thousands of flights.

Luckily, Nickel managed to avoid getting stranded due to cancellations but, because of the issues impacting nationwide travel, she regularly checks her flight status leading up departure.

“I have been trying to find as many directs as I can, but it has actually been pretty challenging. Flights are actually really limited right now, and I have been having an issue, especially with long layovers, just trying to get from one place to the next,” Nickel said.

With Thanksgiving just three weeks away, it’s unclear if the issues involving cancellations will be cleared up by the time the turkey is thawed.

Jessica Mayle, public affairs specialist for the Transportation Security Administration in the Great Lakes region, said, “It really it is hard to predict and obviously the circumstances that have led to those cancellations is kind of, in a lot of cases, a lot of different factors that are intersecting right now.”

Cynthia Bearden dropped her mom off at IND on Wednesday for a flight, and has plans to fly with her mother right before Christmas from Oregon.

“That is why we walked them in today is because we were afraid getting in here that her flight might be canceled,” Bearden said.

She is already anxious thinking about her mother’s flight in December. “There is not too much you can do about it right now. It is just you do what you can do and hope that something else will become available so you can get where you need to be,” Bearden said.

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration is expecting levels of travel this holiday season to resume the pace prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, so getting on another flight in the case of a cancellation could be challenging.

The public affairs specialist said, “Indianapolis, we are at, as of this week, about 92% of our 2019 passenger numbers, so obviously that is a better comparison that 2020 would be.”

As of Wednesday night, no flights scheduled for Thursday or Friday in or out of Indianapolis had been canceled.

Also, the Transportation Security Administration recommends holiday passengers get to the airport early and make sure to regularly check a flight’s status in the case of a change, with the goal to try and reschedule with as few travel interruptions as possible.



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Canada launches proof of vaccination credential for international travel – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


(CNN) — Canada is launching a standardized proof of vaccination credential in the coming weeks for both domestic and international travel.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement outside a children’s hospital in Ottawa Thursday, saying Canada is among the world’s leaders in vaccination rates and Canadians want to begin traveling again.

“As Canadians look to start traveling again, there will be a standardized proof of vaccination certificate,” said Trudeau during a news conference with reporters adding, “we’ve worked very closely with airline operators to ensure that it is as easy and seamless a process as possible.”

The vaccine credential, provided by provincial and territorial health departments, will show a name, date of birth, and a COVID-19 vaccine history including the type of vaccine received, doses and the dates those doses were administered.

Canada says the COVID-19 proof of vaccination was designed with a common look in mind, even though it will be issued by each province or territory and it will include Canada’s “wordmark” emblem.

Government officials say this will allow other countries and transportation providers, such as airlines and cruise ship operators, to recognize this credential as a trusted Canadian document.

They add that Canada will continue to engage with the World Health Organization and allies around the world to ensure the credential is accepted as proof of vaccination.

So far, many, but not all Canadian provinces and territories have introduced proof of vaccination apps with QR codes for some workers and for entry to many public venues.

This new credential will also help Canada enforce one of the toughest vaccine mandates for domestic travel anywhere in the world beginning October 30.

At that time, all travelers 12 years of age and older departing from Canadian airports, or boarding the national rail carrier, VIA Rail, will be required to show proof of full vaccination in order to travel. For the month of November only, travelers will be permitted to show a negative COVID-19 molecular test within 72 hours of travel as an alternative.

Despite high vaccine uptake, Trudeau says he hopes this new credential will encourage even more Canadians to get vaccinated.

Canada has been dealing with pockets of vaccine resistance, especially in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, where lower vaccination rates have helped fuel a punishing fourth wave of the virus, overwhelming hospitals and intensive care units.

According to Health Canada, by early October, at least 72% of Canadians were fully vaccinated with about 82% of those eligible fully vaccinated.



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The Michigan State football travel guide: Indiana University


After surviving a weekend in Piscataway, the Michigan State Spartans are back on the road, taking on the Indiana Hoosiers down in Bloomington, Indiana.

If you are heading down to southern Indiana to catch the game, there are plenty of restaurants, bars and attractions on and near the campus of Indiana University to check out.

The Campus

Indiana University is one of the most historic universities in the Big Ten. Founded in 1820, Indiana is the third oldest in the conference, behind only the University of Rutgers and the University of Michigan. There are plenty of iconic landmarks throughout the more than 200-year-old campus.

Of course, for those making the trek down to the Hoosier state this weekend, Memorial Stadium, better known as “The Rock,” will be a central aspect of the trip. Don’t forget to take a peak at the prow of the USS Indiana, a former battleship of the U.S. Navy, which sits just outside the stadium.

It might be a good idea to park a bit farther than normal and stroll around Indiana’s campus on the way to the game.

“Just walk around,” Patrick Felts, a student at Indiana and the multimedia football reporter at the Indiana Daily Student, said. “I might be biased, but I don’t think there’s a more beautiful campus on the face of the earth.”

The most iconic start to a walk through Indiana’s campus starts at the Sample Gates, which guard the entrance to the oldest part of the university. It is a classic spot to snap photos for visitors and students alike. Right around the corner gates is Dunn Woods, a 20-acre patch of land with winding brick pathways cutting through forestry. The Rose Well House, a limestone gazebo, is a campus landmark found in Dunn Woods.

There is plenty of unique architecture found throughout the campus. Eskenazi Museum of Art, — designed by the same architect that designed the Louvre in Paris, I.M. Pei — Lilly Library and Beck Chapel are just a few of the standouts on the Bloomington campus.

Bloomington

Indiana University teaches more than 80 languages — perhaps that is why Bloomington has such a diverse representation of cuisine from around the world.

Eighteen countries are represented by over 75 international restaurants throughout Bloomington, with anything from Turkish to Thai clustered mostly on 4th street.

Also, pro tip from Felts: if you find yourself out on the town during or after a night at the bars and have a craving for sushi or teriyaki, Z & C Teriyaki & Sushi has you covered.

If you are looking for a staple of Bloomington’s pizza scene, Mother Bear’s Pizza is a local favorite.

“It is pretty much the iconic Indiana restaurant,” Felts said.

Those looking to consume their daily calories in the form of alcohol can find plenty of bars up and down the streets of Kirkwood Ave., the central road and artery of activity in Bloomington. Kilroy’s is one of the most popular bars in Bloomington, especially among the student base, Felts said.

Nick’s English Hut is a more family friendly bar that specializes in both booze and food, with Indiana apparel and pictures crowding the walls and creating a real college eatery experience. The bar is also known for “sink the biz,” a drinking game that includes a bucket of beer and a floating cup.

Surrounding the city are plenty of parks and forests for those looking to get more in touch with nature in southern Indiana. A short drive from campus is McCormick Creek State Park, Indiana’s oldest state park, complete with waterfalls and hiking trails.

Also not far from campus is the 202,814-acre Hoosier National Forest, which is especially scenic in the midst of autumn, Felts said. It is a bit of a further drive, but Felts said Brown County State Park, the largest of Indiana’s state parks, also offers the opportunity to hike through the nature of Indiana.

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The Michigan State football travel guide: Indiana University


After surviving a weekend in Piscataway, the Michigan State Spartans are back on the road, taking on the Indiana Hoosiers down in Bloomington, Indiana.

If you are heading down to southern Indiana to catch the game, there are plenty of restaurants, bars and attractions on and near the campus of Indiana University to check out.

The Campus

Indiana University is one of the most historic universities in the Big Ten. Founded in 1820, Indiana is the third oldest in the conference, behind only the University of Rutgers and the University of Michigan. There are plenty of iconic landmarks throughout the more than 200-year-old campus.

Of course, for those making the trek down to the Hoosier state this weekend, Memorial Stadium, better known as “The Rock,” will be a central aspect of the trip. Don’t forget to take a peak at the prow of the USS Indiana, a former battleship of the U.S. Navy, which sits just outside the stadium.

It might be a good idea to park a bit farther than normal and stroll around Indiana’s campus on the way to the game.

“Just walk around,” Patrick Felts, a student at Indiana and the multimedia football reporter at the Indiana Daily Student, said. “I might be biased, but I don’t think there’s a more beautiful campus on the face of the earth.”

The most iconic start to a walk through Indiana’s campus starts at the Sample Gates, which guard the entrance to the oldest part of the university. It is a classic spot to snap photos for visitors and students alike. Right around the corner gates is Dunn Woods, a 20-acre patch of land with winding brick pathways cutting through forestry. The Rose Well House, a limestone gazebo, is a campus landmark found in Dunn Woods.

There is plenty of unique architecture found throughout the campus. Eskenazi Museum of Art, — designed by the same architect that designed the Louvre in Paris, I.M. Pei — Lilly Library and Beck Chapel are just a few of the standouts on the Bloomington campus.

Bloomington

Indiana University teaches more than 80 languages — perhaps that is why Bloomington has such a diverse representation of cuisine from around the world.

Eighteen countries are represented by over 75 international restaurants throughout Bloomington, with anything from Turkish to Thai clustered mostly on 4th street.

Also, pro tip from Felts: if you find yourself out on the town during or after a night at the bars and have a craving for sushi or teriyaki, Z & C Teriyaki & Sushi has you covered.

If you are looking for a staple of Bloomington’s pizza scene, Mother Bear’s Pizza is a local favorite.

“It is pretty much the iconic Indiana restaurant,” Felts said.

Those looking to consume their daily calories in the form of alcohol can find plenty of bars up and down the streets of Kirkwood Ave., the central road and artery of activity in Bloomington. Kilroy’s is one of the most popular bars in Bloomington, especially among the student base, Felts said.

Nick’s English Hut is a more family friendly bar that specializes in both booze and food, with Indiana apparel and pictures crowding the walls and creating a real college eatery experience. The bar is also known for “sink the biz,” a drinking game that includes a bucket of beer and a floating cup.

Surrounding the city are plenty of parks and forests for those looking to get more in touch with nature in southern Indiana. A short drive from campus is McCormick Creek State Park, Indiana’s oldest state park, complete with waterfalls and hiking trails.

Also not far from campus is the 202,814-acre Hoosier National Forest, which is especially scenic in the midst of autumn, Felts said. It is a bit of a further drive, but Felts said Brown County State Park, the largest of Indiana’s state parks, also offers the opportunity to hike through the nature of Indiana.

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COVID-19 particles float and travel longer in high winds as variants evolve – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather


by: Dr. Mary Gillis, D.Ed.

Posted: / Updated:

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – COVID-19 variants are getting better at traveling through the air. This is according to a new study published by researchers at the University of Maryland. Scientists found the alpha variant specifically is gaining speed when an infected person exhales.

The strain disperses 43 to 100 times more coronavirus particles compared to the original. This would suggest that windy weather could work in COVID-19’s favor by allowing the infection to be carried farther and linger longer in the air resulting in a greater risk of infection when outdoors in breezy weather. However, it’s actually the opposite.

“I think the risk of that is incredibly low, Dr. Christopher Doehring, vice president of medical affairs at Franciscan Health, told News 8. “Certainly, the open air with wind blowing or airflow and that nature will disperse the aerosols to a point where the risk would be pretty close to zero.”

Doehring goes on to explain that even though the virus is evolving to float and travel longer in high winds, the wind would offset any danger by scattering the particles so they break apart. 

However, the authors only compared the alpha variant with the original virus. More research is needed to determine if these findings also apply to the delta variant. 



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