Tips On Travel Insurance, Airlines And More


Experts have been saying that this Thanksgiving is going to kick off one of the busiest holiday travel periods in recent history—and the crowds are already proving it. The Transportation Security Administration reported that more than 2.2 million travelers passed through airports in the United States on Friday—a record. It was the most people the TSA has screened in a single day since the start of the pandemic. Travel sites are also seeing the same kind of traffic: Tripit is experiencing nearly triple the volume of last year, with flight bookings up 298%, hotels up 258%, vacation rentals up 175% and car rentals up 390%.

From travel insurance to advice on the airlines to the best travel deals, here’s what you need to know, whether you’re traveling over the coming week or anytime during the holiday travel season:

Arrive at the airport early. A third of all Thanksgiving travelers will be taking to the skies on Tuesday and Wednesday, so expect lines at airports. “Arriving at the airport two hours early is usually the gold standard, but this year I would recommend two and a half hours if possible,” says Jen Moyse, senior director of Product at TripIt. According to Tripit, some of the busiest airports will be San Francisco International Airport (SFO), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Denver International Airport (DEN), Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) and Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD).

Be aware of COVID-19 protocols. It is the law that people must wear a mask in airports and on planes or any other type of public transportation in the U.S.—but that’s not the only place you’ll need it. “Be sure to keep a mask on hand when visiting hotel common spaces like the front lobby or dining area, and bring your vaccine card or negative COVID test results with you when out and about (tucked away safely) in case somewhere you hope to visit requires one,” says Moyse.

Pack light. If possible, carry your bags on the plane, since checking luggage can add time (and expense). Another advantage: You won’t have to wait for luggage when you land, so your vacation can start right away.

Think about travel insurance. Is it too late to get travel insurance to cover delays or trip interruptions? “The simple answer is you can technically get travel insurance the day before (even the day of) your trip, however, your coverage options will be very limited,” says Meghan Kayata, a spokesperson for InsureMyTrip. “You can put in your trip info on InsureMyTrip.com and see what options there are available. Our customer care call center is also available for those who would like to be walked through the options.” A note: For future trips, it’s a good idea to get a travel insurance policy as soon as you put any kind of money down to get the most options, like Cancel for Any Reason insurance. 

Covid insurance: Speaking of travel insurance, if you’re traveling internationally, you’ll need to get a Covid test to return to the United States. It’s a good idea to get Covid insurance, even if the destination doesn’t require it. You’d hate to get stuck somewhere and have to pay a ton of money out of pocket for hotels and more.

Confirm your rental car. There’s been a massive rental car shortage that has already impacted many plans this year—and it’s only going to get worse. “With reservations up 390% from 2020, it’s worth calling ahead and triple confirming your reservation,” says Moyse. Another tip: Check with your provider to learn the quickest and easiest way to get your car when you arrive. “And don’t forget to keep them in the loop if your flight plans change,” says Moyse.

Plan your drive wisely: Expect traffic delays. According to transportation analytics company INRIX, road travel will be about 40% higher than normal over the holiday. Drivers should plan for traffic if they’re leaving on Wednesday—which will be the busiest day of the Thanksgiving travel season. Leave after 9 p.m., if you can. Or a better bet: drive on Thanksgiving Day before 11 a.m. If you’re returning on Saturday or Sunday, leave before noon.

Get Your Car Ready: According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, 24% of all accidents are weather-related, so as you head into the holiday travel season, it’s a good idea to make sure your car is weather-proofed. Check your windshield wipers to ensure optimum visibility in the event of inclement conditions and consider getting a portable jump starter like the Michelin High-Capacity Jump Starter and Power Bank.

Book your next trip now. If you’re a procrastinator, there’s good news and bad news. The good news? “We’re currently seeing more last-minute deals on cheap flights than ever before,” says Willis Orlando of Scott’s Cheap Flights. “The bad news? This golden opportunity for last-minute deals probably won’t last much longer.” So where to go? “Demand to hot leisure destinations like Miami and Las Vegas is back with a vengeance, whereas business-heavy destinations like San Francisco have been slower to bounce back,” says Orlando. If you’re traveling abroad or to one of these business-heavy domestic destinations, Orlando predicts that you can expect to see a couple more months of last-minute deals, as demand creeps back to normal.

READ MORE:

• The Most Stressed Out State In America Will Surprise You

• The Top 19 Cheap Hotels: Five-Star Luxury Under $50 A Night



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Stranded in the pandemic, his travel insurance failed to cover $38,000 medical bill – Daily News


By Arthur Allen | Kaiser Health News

Duy Hoa Tran, a retired Vietnamese schoolteacher, arrived in Los Angeles in February 2020 to visit his daughter and 2-month-old grandson. Two weeks later, the door closed behind him. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, Vietnam shut its borders. No commercial flights would be allowed into the country for the next 18 months.

Tran’s daughter, An Tran, who has a doctorate in business administration and teaches marketing at the University of La Verne, did what she thought was necessary to ensure medical coverage for her then-65-year-old father during the pandemic. But the only option for a visitor on a tourist visa was travel insurance. In early March 2020, An Tran found and purchased a policy, for about $350 a month, from a company called Seven Corners.

She might as well not have bothered.

The elder Tran had been staying at An’s home in Diamond Bar about a year when he told his daughter he was having trouble seeing out of his right eye. A visit to an ophthalmologist produced a solemn verdict: Tran had severe glaucoma and would quickly go blind unless he got surgery.

Seven Corners gave written preapproval for the procedures recommended by Dr. Brian Chen. To be safe, An Tran called the insurer “many times” to confirm it would cover the expense, but no one she spoke with would give her a definitive answer, she said. Chen, however, assured An that insurance companies typically covered the treatment, which was pretty routine.

On April 19, Tran underwent the first of three eye surgeries to resolve the glaucoma. The surgeries — the last was on July 19 — were successful. And then on Aug. 5, Seven Corners sent An Tran a denial of service letter.

The company’s policy excluded coverage for any “preexisting condition,” by which it meant any condition “whether or not previously manifested, symptomatic, known, diagnosed, treated or disclosed,” the letter said.

Soon after her father’s eye surgeries, An Tran, of Diamond Bar, California, found out that travel insurance typically offers little protection for any health problem linked to a preexisting condition. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

An Tran and her father were on the hook for nearly $38,000 in medical bills, although Seven Corners had preauthorized the surgery and she had paid around $6,000 for the insurance over the previous year and a half.

As for the bill, “my dad obviously can’t pay it,” Tran said. His $260 monthly pension from the Vietnamese government isn’t enough for him to live on in Vietnam, she said.

The surgical procedures Duy Hoa Tran received are quite routine in the United States, said Dr. Davinder Grover, an ophthalmologist in the Dallas area and clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Medicare would generally pay about a quarter of the $37,896.83 Tran was billed for the surgeries, Grover said. If Tran’s daughter had known beforehand that insurance wouldn’t cover the procedures, the physician’s practice might have been willing to charge something like $12,000, he said.

The policy An Tran purchased had no deductible and offered coverage of up to $100,000 in medical bills, including COVID care. But travel insurance generally covers only emergency or urgent medical expenses, according to the California state insurance commission, which regulates policies in the state.

Megan Moncrief, chief marketing officer for Squaremouth, which aggregates various companies’ travel insurance plans — including some from Seven Corners — and offers them through its website, said the policy language was not unusual for travel insurance. She noted the policy’s stipulation that it covered some acute conditions only if the patient sought treatment within 24 hours of the initial symptoms.

Moncrief said the fact that Tran did not seek treatment immediately may be the reason his surgeries weren’t covered. (Seven Corners refused all comment on the case.) She acknowledged it was hardly surprising he hadn’t dashed to the doctor at the first sign of discomfort: “I don’t know that I would have done that either, if I just had blurry vision.”

As for Seven Corners’ refusal to pay despite precertification, this is not uncommon, she said. By precertifying, the insurer verifies that a procedure is a covered benefit but doesn’t guarantee the insurer will cover it for that particular patient.

Travel insurance typically offers little protection for any health problem linked to a preexisting condition, regardless of whether that condition has ever been diagnosed, says Susan Yates, general manager in the U.S. for Falck Global Assistance, an international insurer.

“For visitors to the U.S., especially those who are not permanent residents or citizens, it can be difficult to obtain health insurance,” she said. The Affordable Care Act doesn’t cover tourists, though some resident noncitizens can buy coverage.

“It’s usually better for a visitor to buy travel insurance from their country of origin, but in some countries (Vietnam being one), the insurance market is not developed,” Yates wrote in an email.

Tran had tried unsuccessfully for months to fly home to his town near Ho Chi Minh City, where his wife lives with another grandchild. On 14 occasions, An bought him tickets on regular commercial flights that were subsequently canceled. He was also unable to get a seat on charter flights arranged by the Vietnamese government; those tickets generally were available only through third parties charging up to $10,000.

The eye surgeon, Chen, offered to discuss the case with KHN, but his medical group’s counsel said it had a policy against discussing insurance issues with reporters, even with the patient’s consent.

After KHN approached him to discuss the issue, Chen told An Tran that he was waiving his $8,144 fee for the surgeries. The Acuity Eye Group, where he practices, would not immediately confirm Chen’s offer, but told An Tran they were seeking approvals to waive his fee and all other charges as well.

On Sept. 15, Duy Hoa Tran finally managed to get on a charter flight back to Vietnam. He’s happy to be home, An Tran said.

Under California’s filial responsibility laws, she could be liable for his remaining bills.

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.



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Arch RoamRight Travel Insurance Recognized by Travel Weekly with Multiple Magellan Awards


HUNT VALLEY, Md.–()–Travel insurance brand Arch RoamRight was awarded two gold Travel Weekly Magellan Awards in the categories of Marketing-Crisis Communication and Marketing-Direct Mail. A silver Magellan Award was given in the category of Overall-Travel Insurance.

The awards are hosted by Travel Weekly and honor outstanding design, marketing and services in the travel industry.

“Our entry on Outstanding Service During COVID-19 is a testament to the quality of our customer and partner support, as well as our overall dedication to the travel industry,” said Tim Dodge, Vice President of Marketing for Arch RoamRight. “We are also exceptionally proud of The Travel Insurance PlaybookTM, which is our annual publication on travel trends and changes in the industry.”

“Each year we recognize industry innovators and creative communicators through our Magellan Awards. This year, we recognize the resilience, ingenuity and path forward created by those who shared their company’s initiatives through words, images and design, and kept travel part of the conversation and part of the equation,” said Arnie Weissmann, editor-in-chief of Travel Weekly.

With entries from across the U.S. and around the world, the Magellan Award winners represent the best in the travel industry and salute the outstanding travel professionals behind it all.

The Magellan Awards are judged and overseen by a one-of-a-kind panel of top travel professionals representing the best names and most accomplished leaders from the industry. In determining winners, entries do not compete with one another, instead they are judged against a standard of excellence based on the long experience of Travel Weekly. To uphold this high standard of excellence, a category may have multiple winners, or may have no winners at all.

For a complete list of silver and gold winners, please visit www.travelweeklyawards.com.

About Arch Roamright

Arch RoamRight (www.RoamRight.com) is the co-branding of Arch and RoamRight® marks used by Arch Insurance Company to market its travel insurance that insures U.S. residents traveling around the world. From trip cancellation to travel medical insurance plans and an award-winning mobile app and website, Arch RoamRightTM is an industry leader in innovation and technological solutions. In 2021, Arch RoamRight has won multiple American Business Awards® and was named one of the Best in Travel Insurance for 2021 by Money.com.

About Travel Weekly

Travel Weekly is the most influential provider of news, research, opinion and analysis to the North American travel trade marketplace. It reaches a broad industry audience in print, online and with face-to-face events throughout the year. Travel Weekly is a division of Secaucus, New Jersey-based Northstar Travel Media, the largest travel business-to-business travel publisher in the world.

About Northstar Travel Group

Northstar Travel Group is the leading B-to-B information and marketing solutions company serving all travel industry segments, including leisure/retail, corporate/business travel, corporate and sports meetings, incentives, hospitality, and travel technology. Northstar is the owner of leading brands serving these travel segments. The company produces more than 100 face-to-face events in 13 countries in retail travel, hospitality, corporate travel, travel technology, sports travel, and the meetings & incentive industry. In addition, Northstar owns Phocuswright, the leading research and event producer serving the travel technology industry. Northstar Travel Group owns the BHN Group, the leading producer of hotel investment conferences. Northstar is also the majority shareholder in Inntopia, the leading SaaS e-commerce software business serving the mountain destination, golf, activities, and hospitality markets. Based in Secaucus, NJ, the company has 7 offices in the U.S., U.K., Singapore, and China. Northstar Travel Group is owned by funds managed by EagleTree Capital.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a “safe harbor” for forward-looking statements. This release or any other written or oral statements made by or on behalf of Arch Capital Group Ltd. and its subsidiaries may include forward-looking statements, which reflect our current views with respect to future events and financial performance. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, included in or incorporated by reference in this release are forward-looking statements.

Forward-looking statements can generally be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “believe” or “continue” or their negative or variations or similar terminology. Forward-looking statements involve our current assessment of risks and uncertainties. Actual events and results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in these statements. A non-exclusive list of the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in such forward-looking statements includes the following: adverse general economic and market conditions; increased competition; pricing and policy term trends; fluctuations in the actions of rating agencies and the Company’s ability to maintain and improve its ratings; investment performance; the loss of key personnel; the adequacy of the Company’s loss reserves, severity and/or frequency of losses, greater than expected loss ratios and adverse development on claim and/or claim expense liabilities; greater frequency or severity of unpredictable natural and man-made catastrophic events, including pandemics such as COVID-19; the impact of acts of terrorism and acts of war; changes in regulations and/or tax laws in the United States or elsewhere; the Company’s ability to successfully integrate, establish and maintain operating procedures as well as consummate acquisitions and integrate the businesses the Company has acquired or may acquire into the existing operations; changes in accounting principles or policies; material differences between actual and expected assessments for guaranty funds and mandatory pooling arrangements; availability and cost to the Company of reinsurance to manage the Company’s gross and net exposures; the failure of others to meet their obligations to the Company; changes in the method for determining the London Inter-bank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and the potential replacement of LIBOR and other factors identified in the Company’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

The foregoing review of important factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with other cautionary statements that are included herein or elsewhere. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Tag: arch-insurance



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Battleface taking early lead in space insurance race: Travel Weekly


The development of space tourism may still be in its nascent stages, but insurance startup Battleface is looking to stay ahead of the curve with what it claims is the market’s first civilian space travel insurance plan.

Launched earlier this year, Battleface’s space insurance policy is highly customizable, offering many of the same protections typically covered by more traditional travel insurance plans, including trip cancellation and interruption benefits. 

T1025SashaGainullin_C_HEAD [Credit: Courtesy of Battleface]

Sasha Gainullin

“For example, you may have to travel to Texas just to get to your space launch,” said Battleface CEO Sasha Gainullin. “So, standard travel insurance is still an important part of your journey from the time you leave home to the time you come back.”

Unlike regular travel insurance, however, the company’s space travel protections also include add-ons like accidental death and permanent dismemberment coverage. The policy is also far more costly, due to the high expense and risk associated with space travel. 

T0816NEPTUNEONE_C_HR [Credit: Courtesy of Space Perspectice]

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Space Perspectice

When are astronauts not astronauts? When they pay their own way into space, says NASA. But the growing overlap between exploration and adventure travel is redefining both categories.

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“It’s very much geared toward individual travelers,” said Gainullin. “We have to understand their background, financial situation, nationality, what they’re looking for in terms of coverage, the training they’re going through and just how safe it is for them to be going into space.”

Gainullin added that Battleface’s space insurance product, which is underwritten by Lloyd’s of London, remains a work in progress. The company plans to adapt its insurance offering as the space tourism landscape continues to evolve.

“One problem we’ll need to solve in the future is how to actually provide assistance [in the event of] an emergency space evacuation,” said Gainullin. 

Although it’s early days, interest in Battleface’s civilian space travel insurance has already proven to be fairly robust. The company has been fielding numerous queries from specialty tour operators and travel agencies building a focus around space tourism as well as from brokers working to organize space travel for high net worth individuals. 

Just how big the space tourism market is set to grow remains to be seen, but a recent report from Lloyd’s projects that the space travel industry is on track to be worth $1 trillion by 2040.

According to Gainullin, civilian space travel could go relatively mainstream sooner than many might imagine.

“Just last week, we were on the phone with a U.K. travel agency that’s building out an entire model around space tourism, and within the next couple of years, they’re expecting to have space mission trips up to four days in length,” said Gainullin. “So, certainly it’s becoming more and more serious as an industry. And if the pricing [goes down a level], then I think it could become much more like a standard trip type.”

The foray into space travel insurance appears to have been a natural next move for Battleface, which, since launching as a consumer-facing insurance model in 2018, has long specialized in travel insurance products for travelers interested in remote destinations as well as more adventure-oriented activities.

The company has also put a strong emphasis on working with travel agencies, especially those with a focus on adventure and other niche travel experiences.

“What we’ve seen, especially now, is that a lot of travel agents are specializing in a [specific field], whether that’s trips to Antarctica or trips to space,” said Gainullin. “And those are the types of travel agencies that we love to work with.” 



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Top Travel Insurance Questions Answered as Americans Consider Holiday Plans | National News


WARWICK, R.I., Oct. 20, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Health officials are giving fully vaccinated Americans the go-ahead to gather for the holidays.  As US travelers set their 2021 holiday plans, InsureMyTrip Product Expert, Meghan Walch, is answering the most frequently asked questions.

The vast majority of questions are about the pandemic and what travel insurance will cover. In fact, of those researching Cancel For Any Reason coverage (CFAR) on InsureMyTrip.com between August 10, 2021October 14, 2021:

  • 86 percent are concerned about needing to cancel a trip due to travel changes around Covid-19 restrictions
  • 61 percent are concerned about needing to cancel due to fear of contracting Covid-19 

While Covid-19 remains a top concern for would-be travelers, Walch offers expert responses for the top questions received by the InsureMyTrip Customer Care Center:

Top Travel Insurance Questions For Holiday Travelers

Q: Does InsureMyTrip have policies that cover a required quarantine if I contract Covid-19 during a trip?   

A:  The short answer is “yes”. A physician ordered quarantine may be covered by travel insurance.   Comprehensive plans can help to reimburse you for additional accommodations if you are required by a physician to quarantine during a trip. 

Quarantine would need to be listed as a covered reason in a policy under Travel Delay and Trip Interruption coverage.  It is also important to understand how “quarantine” is defined in a policy, the coverage limits provided, and if it will cover certain situations such as self-isolation or stay-at-home orders.

Q: What happens if a county closes during a trip?

A:  A country closing prior to departure is not a covered reason under general Trip Cancellation coverage.  A policy with optional Cancel For Any Reason (CFAR) may be the only way to have any coverage in the event you need to cancel your trip for this reason.  CFAR may allow you the most flexibility if canceling at least two days before you leave for a trip due to something other than a covered reason listed in the policy.  If borders and/or the country close while you are there, it may be best to seek help from the US embassy at your location and contact the assistance service provider listed on your policy.   They may be able to help you arrange emergency transportation (although at your own expense) back home.

Q: Who qualifies for Cancel for Any Reason (CFAR) coverage?

A:  There are several eligibility requirements for CFAR protection.  They may require travelers to insure 100% of their pre-paid, non-refundable trip costs.  CFAR coverage must be purchased as part of a comprehensive travel insurance plan, within 10-21 days after making the initial trip payment/deposit.  InsureMyTrip has a new tool that makes it easier for travelers to find out if they are eligible for CFAR. (see below for more information on CFAR)

Q: What happens if I contract a breakthrough Covid-19 infection on a trip?

A: Providers offering comprehensive travel insurance plans on InsureMyTrip.com may cover Covid-19 like any other covered, unforeseen illness.  So, if you contract Covid-19 before a trip and a physician confirms you are unable to travel, you may have coverage to cancel your trip.

If you become ill while on your trip, there may be coverage if you need to interrupt your trip.   Again, you would need proof from a doctor. 

Also, emergency medical benefits may be available to help reimburse expenses if you see a doctor or need to be hospitalized related to COVID-19. In all cases, your policy would have to be purchased prior to any covered issues becoming known. 

Travelers can contact InsureMyTrip at 1-800-487-4722 to reach a travel insurance expert.

Covid-19 Coverage Tool

Since Covid-19 is top of mind for travelers this holiday season, InsureMyTrip is offering new technology to help put their minds at ease.

A Covid-19 recommendation tool that has been added to InsureMyTrip’s quote process.  Once travel insurance recommendations pop up, travelers can click on the “Top picks for Covid-19” button and find all the plans that address pandemic-related travel concerns.  

MORE: COVID-19 & Travel Insurance Information Hub 

To schedule an interview with an expert or to request specific research data on holiday travel plans, please contact [email protected] 

Media Contact:

Meghan Kayata

[email protected] 

Cancel for Any Reason Coverage:

Cancel For Any Reason (also known as: CFAR) is an optional upgrade. CFAR offers the most trip cancellation flexibility and is the only option available to cover Covid-19 travel fear. Full terms of coverage will be listed in state-specific policy. If eligibility requirements are met, reimbursement is typically 50% – 75% of the insured prepaid non-refundable trip cost if all eligibility requirements are met (available in most states).

Note: coverages are governed by the specific plan certificate. Traditional travel insurance does not offer cancellation coverage for fear of travel, whether related to COVID-19 or not. Cancel For Any Reason is required.

About InsureMyTrip

It’s simple. InsureMyTrip finds you the right travel insurance plan, every time. InsureMyTrip is the authority on travel insurance. We are committed to empowering travelers to make the best possible insurance decisions by leveraging our technology, data intelligence, and expertise. InsureMyTrip is rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau.

Cision View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/top-travel-insurance-questions-answered-as-americans-consider-holiday-plans-301404793.html

SOURCE InsureMyTrip





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Martin’s car and home insurance warning ahead of groundreaking rule changes


7. More than one car in the home? Multicar policies could save or cost you £100s

Multicar insurance policies aren’tincluded on comparison sites, so to find out if you’ll save requires digital elbow grease.

My rule of thumb is first try the opposite to what you have, as insurance has always been about sucking in newbies with special deals. So if you’ve multicar, try standalone policies. Got standalone? Then try multicar.

The three pure multicar discount policies are from Admiral MultiCar*, Aviva* and LV*. All let you set up a policy at your 1st car’s renewal, leaving the other car(s) on its existing insurer until their renewal. See multicar split-year renewals.

There are also multi-policy discounts, reducing the cost if you’ve two cars, or get car and home insurance together. These include More Than (15% off), Axa* (up to 15%), Esure* (10%), Privilege (varies) and Sheilas’ Wheels* (10%). Plus, Direct Line* and Churchill also offer discounts for multiple cars.

Multicar worked for Kam, who told us on Facebook: “I saved £500 by sticking both my and my wife’s car on a multicar policy.”

But Nigel tweeted that splitting was better: “@MartinSLewis I was with multicar until at renewal they wanted over £1,300 for 3 cars. Got 3 individual policies for under £600.”





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Is Travel Insurance Worth the Cost Right Now? – NBC 7 San Diego


Planning a vacation can be stressful. The pandemic showed how quickly plans can change and need to be adjusted or even canceled. With borders opening back up and cruise lines running once again, people are taking a closer look at travel insurance.

“About one-third of Americans are now wanting to purchase travel insurance,” said Doug Shupe of the Auto Club of Southern California. “They say that it’s directly because of the pandemic.”

Travel insurance protects customers who have unexpected issues arise that affect their vacation plans. Depending on the type of insurance, it can cover anything from cancelations beyond your control, to family emergencies.

“Travel insurance is relatively inexpensive when you consider how much you spend on vacation,” said Shupe. “But reach out to the travel insurance provider to get questions answered before you purchase that insurance.”

Make sure you know exactly what is covered. Many vacations canceled because of the pandemic were not covered by travel insurance.

“In the past travel insurance has not covered epidemics or pandemics, but that is changing,” said Shupe. “More and more travel insurance providers are starting to meet consumer demand and wishes, so there are more coverage options for certain kinds of covid situations.”

There are two major types of travel insurance. Basic trip cancellation protection covers small things that go wrong, such as losing your bags or getting sick before a trip. Comprehensive travel insurance covers major issues such as a medical emergency, or even the destination being hit by a disaster.

Check to see if the travel insurance you are looking to purchase includes a “cancel for any reason” clause and double-check what the policy’s pandemic coverage is.

Buying comprehensive travel insurance can get costly, so weigh the pros and cons. Depending on the plan, it might cost between 4 and 12% of the total price of your trip. It may work better for more expensive and international travel, instead of short trips.

Also be sure to check with your credit card company, auto, and medical insurance providers. Some companies will provide protections for travel booked using their cards or for their customers.



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Why you should buy travel insurance for your holiday trip – WKRG News 5


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation, as too many things can go wrong.

Over the weekend, thousands of Southwest Airlines flights were canceled, and the disruptions continued Monday, when cancellations amounted to 10% of Southwest’s schedule, and at least 1,400 other flights, or roughly 40%, were delayed, according to the FlightAware tracking service. 

Many passengers were stuck in airports, scrambling to find a way to get home. One couple at the Tampa International Airport told WFLA they paid as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline has blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

With the holidays fast approaching, experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season by purchasing travel insurance ahead of time, experts say.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told WFLA.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now as travel troubles continue to plague the country. Judd said purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “It’s just too many things that can happen.”

She said she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s a huge savings. So if you purchase it upfront and if you purchase it within seven to 14 days, it covers preexisting. You can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason’ for an extra benefit. Cancel for work reasons. There’s a lot of people who can’t go because, you know, last-minute, their boss says, ‘Oh, I’m sorry, but you have to do ‘this.’ I know you have a trip, but sorry,’” Judd remarked.

With frequent delays and cancellations, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative coming into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel trip insurance will then help cover some of those extra amenities,” Judd said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Why you should get travel insurance for your holiday trip


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning successful trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation.

She says in today’s travel world too many things can go wrong.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season, experts say, by purchasing travel insurance ahead of them, describing it as the key to a calm journey.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told 8 On Your Side.

With the holidays fast approaching, those same experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

Right now, Southwest Airlines is still facing countless flight delays, and that’s left many travelers scrambling to try and get home.

Thousands of flights were canceled over the weekend, and the disruptions continued Monday.

Many passengers were stranded in cities like Tampa, some of them stuck in the airport paying as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now, as travel troubles continue to plague the country.

Judd says purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “There’s too many things that can happen.”

Judd says she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The extra money, Judd told us, will pay for itself in peace of mind, which is priceless during a season shaping up to be busier than ever.

“It’s a huge savings. If you purchase it upfront, with 7-14 days, it covers preexisting, you can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason,’ you can get ‘cancel-for-work’ because a lot of bosses will say, oh you can’t go. I know you have a trip, but sorry,” Judd remarked.

With delays and constant cancellations in today’s current travel conditions, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative flying into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel and trip insurance will then help cover those extra amenities,” Judd said.



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Why you should you get travel insurance for your holiday trip


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning successful trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation.

She says in today’s travel world too many things can go wrong.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season, experts say, by purchasing travel insurance ahead of them, describing it as the key to a calm journey.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told 8 On Your Side.

With the holidays fast approaching, those same experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

Right now, Southwest Airlines is still facing countless flight delays, and that’s left many travelers scrambling to try and get home.

Thousands of flights were canceled over the weekend, and the disruptions continued Monday.

Many passengers were stranded in cities like Tampa, some of them stuck in the airport paying as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now, as travel troubles continue to plague the country.

Judd says purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “There’s too many things that can happen.”

Judd says she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The extra money, Judd told us, will pay for itself in peace of mind, which is priceless during a season shaping up to be busier than ever.

“It’s a huge savings. If you purchase it upfront, with 7-14 days, it covers preexisting, you can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason,’ you can get ‘cancel-for-work’ because a lot of bosses will say, oh you can’t go. I know you have a trip, but sorry,” Judd remarked.

With delays and constant cancellations in today’s current travel conditions, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative flying into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel and trip insurance will then help cover those extra amenities,” Judd said.



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