DVIDS – News – Recruiting Station Baton Rouge and Recruiting Station Fort Lauderdale travel to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island for the first Educators Workshop of 2022



PARRIS ISLAND, S.C.—Members of the education system and media outlets from Louisiana and Florida attended an Educators Workshop aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, January 11 – 14, 2022.

The workshop provided the attendees with an in-depth experience of what life is like for a Marine Corps recruit.

“The Educators Workshop has been tremendously helpful by giving us a first-hand view to assist our students with questions,” said Gary Blood, the principal at Port Barre High School in Port Barre, Louisiana, with 20 years of experience in the education system. “It gives us a first-hand opportunity instead of seeing something on TV.”

The Recruit Training Regiment provided drill instructors to escort the workshop in the same manner as recruits in training. Drill instructors also provided the same receiving speech recruits go through when they arrive at MCRD Parris Island.

“I loved the experience. My favorite [part] was the yellow footprints,” said Blood. “Arriving up there on the bus, with it being dark and having to get off, and having the DIs [Drill Instructors] hollering at you, and having to get on the yellow footprints. Just being able to see what the brand new recruits see when they first arrive here and the thought process that could be going through their minds.”

According to Blood, many of the educators who attended this workshop have since changed their view of the Marine Corps and armed services. The workshop allowed educators to address their questions and concerns regarding the enlistment process and future opportunities available to their students, which removed any preconceived notions they may have had before participating in the workshop.

“I think it is beneficial for teachers to attend the workshop for a couple of reasons,” said Staff Sgt. Devin Kennett, a Senior Drill Instructor at MCRD Parris Island, and Educators Workshop escort. “One, it gives them first-hand knowledge of the recruit training process. It is a condensed version where they get the basis of what we do with the recruits from processing all the way through to the training they go through. So, they’re able to take that back to their students and actually give them resources or tips and tricks that can help prepare them. Two, it gets the word out about the Marine Corps and about what we have to offer. There are a lot of kids out there that see the Marine Corps as just a warfighting organization, which we are, but there are a lot of other opportunities out there that the Marine Corps can facilitate for them.”

Educators Workshops provide attendees with the ability to confidently speak about what training is like and what opportunities the Marine Corps has to offer by putting them in simulations of some situations the young men and women endure when they arrive at the recruit depot, and allowing them to ask questions throughout the condensed version of the transformation process. During the tour of the Crucible, recruits’ capstone field training exercise, attendees attempted obstacles at the Leadership Reaction Course. This experience showed them how the recruits’ ability to critically think as a team is tested in various scenarios over one portion of the 54-hour training event. They were also provided several classroom-style periods of instruction where they were taught about the family readiness, tuition assistance, and many other programs and opportunities the Marine Corps provides to Marines and their families.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the workshop, and it has completely changed my perspective of the military,” said Emily Pettaway, the dean of education at St. Louis Catholic School in Lake Charles, Louisiana. “Before this workshop, I would have been reluctant to encourage my son to join a branch of the military. However, after this amazing experience and learning about all of the opportunities, I would be so proud of him if he chooses to do so. This is an experience I will never forget.”

For more information about becoming an influencer for the Marine Corps or the Marine Corps Educators Workshop, visit https://rmi.marines.com/influencer or https://www.mcrc.marines.mil/Outreach/Workshop-Home/.









Date Taken: 01.14.2022
Date Posted: 01.23.2022 23:32
Story ID: 413258
Location: PARRIS ISLAND, SC, US 
Hometown: LAKE CHARLES, LA, US
Hometown: PORT BARRE, LA, US





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Visiting a cruise line’s private island? Don’t make these 11 mistakes






Visiting a cruise line’s private island? Don’t make these 11 mistakes





















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Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.



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Best island for British expats named – ‘sunburnt all the time’ | Travel News | Travel


British expats still deciding on a destination for their relocations may be looking to far-flung places. While Bali, Hawai’i and the Caribbean are attractive options, there are idyllic islands closer to home.

The Postcard Academy podcast said: “Move over Bali, Gran Canaria is the new hot spot for expats.”

With plenty of sun and a relaxed and friendly atmosphere, the Canary Islands, just a hop and skip away, could be the best destination for British expats.

With Gran Canaria, expats, digital nomads and entrepreneurs have found their dream destination.

The main Canaries’ island offers plenty of opportunities for British expats and there is a large expat community.

READ MORE: ‘Disaster’ Cruise guest exposes frustrating experience

On an expat forum, user Boseley wrote: “I live in the Canary Islands and have done for quite a number of years.

“We have an excellent lifestyle, the cost of living is a lot cheaper than the UK, we do not have any heating or air conditioning bills.

“We have a garden and find we can grow almost anything here.

“The islands have been described as the Fortunate Islands, with a climate of eternal springtime.

DON’T MISS

“If we are lucky we receive seven good days of rain annually, lack of wet stuff falling from the sky is a problem.

“I like Las Palmas, a large bustling city with plenty of culture and splendid shops.

“There is also a large city beach called Las Canteras and many smaller towns and villages on or near the coast.”

When one British expat asked where locals would recommend to move, Lola Penate wrote: “For some diversity, culture and shopping I recommend the east coast where you can be in the city in 30 minutes while avoiding the clouds which form more often in the north of the island, even in the summer.

He also explained what the clouds in the north of the island were all about.

He said: “In the Summer months, between the 15th of June and the 15th of September, you have the ‘Panza de burro’ (donkey belly) which is a ‘big cloud’ that covers the north of the island (you can easily go one week without sun). I love it as I’m not sunburnt all the time, but many people hate it.”

Peter recommended the north of the island for working British expats.

He said Las Palmas had “better food, local people, better social life, fewer tourists, co-working spaces, faster internet” and was more “authentic and cheaper”.

However, he also pointed out fewer people spoke English in the north than in the more touristy south.

Wherever British expats decide to move to on the island, the Canary Island, and Gran Canaria in particular, are some of the best islands in the world to move to for British expats.





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Beach bound: Florida’s Amelia Island offers history, cuisine and community


Beach bound: Florida’s Amelia Island offers  history, cuisine and community

Bright colors and tropical plants mix with Spanish moss and Victorian facades on Amelia Island. PHOTO: CELINA COLBY

Amelia Island stretches just 13 miles along the coast of Northern Florida, bordering Georgia. Rich in history and boasting a thriving contemporary food scene, the island blends the Southern charm of Savannah, Georgia with the tropical scenery of a coastal community.

The island that visitors find today was forged in a fascinating history. Abraham Lincoln Lewis was the first African-American millionaire in the state of Florida and in 1935 he set his sights on Amelia Island. To combat the segregation of the Jim Crow Laws, Lewis purchased 216 acres of waterfront land on the Atlantic Ocean side of the island. Naming it American Beach, he developed the area into a thriving resort community for Black Americans.

For decades the beachfront was lit up with families experiencing the beautiful natural landscape, visiting restaurants and enjoying local nightlife. As segregation lifted Black vacationers spread across the island and the focus of American Beach became about preservation. Lewis’s great-granddaughter MaVynee Oshun Betsch, dubbed “The Beach Lady,” by locals, became a champion of the natural dunes on American Beach and spearheaded their protection and preservation under the National Parks Service.

The Fairbanks House bed and breakfast is housed in the 1885 Italianate home of George Rainsford Fairbanks. PHOTO: CELINA COLBY

Though the character of American Beach has evolved with time, that strong sense of community continues to resonate throughout Amelia Island. In Historic Fernandina, a compact neighborhood in the northern half of the island, stories always circle back to the strength of local bonds.

When Marisol Triana and Chris Garcia, the first generation Cuban-American owners of Hola! Cuban Café, found themselves needing to move their restaurant in the height of the pandemic, the community came together to help them. Neighbors sent over construction supplies, art pieces, even bored teenagers with restless energy to burn. Since then, the restaurant has become a neighborhood meeting ground, where locals can be found at all hours catching up over cafecito on the outdoor patio or swapping local news between bites of empanada.

For visitors to the island, historic bed and breakfasts reign over chain hotels. The Fairbanks House is one such property. The 1885 Italianate home of George Rainsford Fairbanks has been transformed into a sprawling inn run by father-son duo Rob and Flint Batterton. In keeping with the close-knit spirit of the island, staying at The Fairbanks House feels like staying at the home of a close friend. Rob cooks up multi-course breakfasts for guests every morning and Flint offers a rich history of the property and insider recommendations for dining spots.

The Book Loft, a fixture of historic Fernandina for more than three decades. PHOTO: CELINA COLBY

The best way to get a sense of the island landscape is by the water and for that options abound. Fort Clinch State Park is an extensive waterfront fort at the northern tip of the island that provides historical context and spacious views across the water to neighboring Georgia. American Beach still boasts the pristine dunes and soft sand beaches that drew Abraham Lincoln Lewis to the region. Or you can take to the water itself on a boat tour around the Amelia River and up past Cumberland Island, where you’re likely to spot dolphins, cranes and wild horses.

In the downtown strip of Historic Fernandina Victorian buildings house local shops and restaurants and mossy trees provide shade from the Florida sunshine.

In The Book Loft, a fixture of the neighborhood for more than three decades, you can pick up a copy of “Saving American Beach,” a children’s book based on the story of MaVynee Oshun Betsch, written by Heidi Tyline King and illustrated by Roxbury native Ekua Holmes. After a day of touring, visitors can satisfy their hunger with a wide spectrum of cuisines, from innovative Asian street food at Wicked Bao to classic French cuisine at Le Clos, a restaurant housed in a former single family home.

Rooted in a powerful historic tradition of people coming together, Amelia Island offers a unique travel experience. For however brief or long a time, visitors are welcomed into a close knit community where neighbors help neighbors and it’s never too late for a trip to the beach.



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Why my private island cruise villa was sort of worth it






5 hours for $1,800: Why my private island cruise villa was sort of worth it
























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Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.



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Men’s Basketball Heads To Rhode Island Wednesday


Saint Joseph’s (7-6, 1-1 A-10) at Rhode Island (9-4, 0-1 A-10)

Wednesday, January 12 | 7:00 p.m. | Ryan Center

ESPN+ |
Listen Live | Live Stats


GAMEDAY LINKS

Saint Joseph’s: Roster | Schedule | Stats

Rhode Island: Roster | Schedule | Stats

THE TIP-OFF

• Saint Joseph’s returns to the road as the Hawks travel to Rhode Island on Wednesday for the first of two meetings this season with the Rams.

• The Hawks and Rhode Island cap the regular season with an afternoon matchup at Hagan Arena on March 5.

• The last time out, the Hawks fell to Davidson, as the Wildcats pulled away for an 88-73 decision last Wednesday.

Dahmir Bishop is coming off a 17-point performance versus Davidson.

• Bishop finished three points shy of his career-high (20 points) as he went 6-of-12 from the field, including 3-of-6 from distance, to go with six rebounds.

Jack Forrest went 5-of-7 from the floor, and 3-of-4 from three-point range, for a season-high 13 points against Davidson.

Jordan Hall added 16 points, six assists and four rebounds last Wednesday.

• Hall currently ranks third in the A-10, and ninth nationally, in assists per game (6.5).

• Saint Joseph’s 32 bench points against the Wildcats were a season-high.

• St. Joe’s was scheduled to play at George Mason this past Saturday, but the game was postponed due to health and safety protocols affecting the Patriots.

THE MATCHUP

Series vs. Rhode Island: Saint Joseph’s leads 56-34

First Meeting: 12/1/51, Saint Joseph’s, 66-61

Last Meeting: 1/3/21, Rhode Island, 85-77 OT

Coach Lange All-Time vs. Rhode Island: 0-3

SAINT JOSEPH’S VERSUS RHODE ISLAND

• Wednesday marks the 91st meeting between Saint Joseph’s and Rhode Island, with the Hawks holding a 56-34 edge in the all-time series.

• Last year, the Hawks and Rams met in an overtime thriller in which Rhode Island prevailed, 85-77.

Taylor Funk finished with 29 points and Cameron Brown had a season-high 21 points at Rhode Island a season ago.

• The Hawks enter Wednesday with a 23-20 record versus the Rams in Rhode Island.

• Saint Joseph’s 56 victories over Rhode Island rank third-most against any opponent, trailing only La Salle (72) and Temple (70) .

HAWKS ADD GREER III

Saint Joseph’s head coach Billy Lange announced on Monday that Lynn Greer III has enrolled on Hawk Hill for the spring 2022 semester. A four-year starter at Roman Catholic High School, Greer III returns to Philadelphia after transferring to Saint Joseph’s from Dayton. While with the Flyers, the 6-foot-3 guard averaged 2.7 points, 1.4 rebounds and 9.0 minutes per game over 10 contests.  A three-time First Team All-Catholic honoree, Greer III led the Cahillites to two Catholic League titles and a PIAA Class 4A championship. Averaging 5.0 assists per game for his career, he finished eighth all-time in scoring at Roman with 1,392 career points. The son of Temple’s second all-time leading scorer and Big 5 Hall of Famer Lynn Greer, Jr., and grandson of Virginia State Hall of Famer Lynn Greer, Sr., Greer III spent a post-graduate year at nationally-ranked IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, before attending Dayton.

NEXT UP

The Hawks return home to host La Salle on Monday, January 17 as part of a Martin Luther King Day doubleheader with the St. Joe’s women’s basketball team. The Hawks’ women’s team take on the Explorers at noon, while the Saint Joseph’s men’s squad and La Salle tip at 4 p.m., with both games nationally televised on CBS Sports Network.

Follow the Saint Joseph’s men’s basketball team on Instagram and Twitter and like the Hawks on Facebook.





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Prepare for winter driving conditions on south Vancouver Island roads – Victoria News


Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways, including the Malahat section of Highway 1, on Dec. 30 after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways, including the Malahat section of Highway 1, on Dec. 30 after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)
Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways Dec. 30, including the Mill Bay section of Highway 1, after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways Dec. 30, including the Mill Bay section of Highway 1, after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)

Wintry conditions continue, but the travel advisory for four south Island highways lifted by 8 a.m. Thursday (Dec. 30).

A snowfall warning of 10 to 15 cm in the region lifted around the same time.

Drive BC asked drivers to stick to essential travel only on Highway 1 from Cowichan to Victoria, Highway 14, Highway 18 and Highway 17 (Pat Bay Highway) after heavy snowfall overnight.

Emcon Services Inc., the contractor responsible for snow clearing on the major roadways, noted the advisory was lifted but reminded drivers to expect winter conditions as crews continue to work through roads by priority classification.


Do you have a story tip? Email: [email protected]

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

malahatSnow






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Prepare for winter driving conditions on on south Vancouver Island roads – Saanich News


Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways, including the Malahat section of Highway 1, on Dec. 30 after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways, including the Malahat section of Highway 1, on Dec. 30 after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)
Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways Dec. 30, including the Mill Bay section of Highway 1, after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)Drive BC limits travel on four major south Island highways Dec. 30, including the Mill Bay section of Highway 1, after heavy snowfall overnight. (DriveBC.ca)

Wintry conditions continue, but the travel advisory for four south Island highways lifted by 8 a.m. Thursday (Dec. 30).

A snowfall warning of 10 to 15 cm in the region lifted around the same time.

Drive BC asked drivers to stick to essential travel only on Highway 1 from Cowichan to Victoria, Highway 14, Highway 18 and Highway 17 (Pat Bay Highway) after heavy snowfall overnight.

Emcon Services Inc., the contractor responsible for snow clearing on the major roadways, noted the advisory was lifted but reminded drivers to expect winter conditions as crews continue to work through roads by priority classification.


Do you have a story tip? Email: [email protected]

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

malahatSnow






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The hermit of Socotra Island


Ellai was born in this cave, as was his mother before him. Unusually in Socotra, where men are traditionally the providers, Ellai’s mother took on the role of fisherman for the family. “I still feel her presence inside the cave,” he told me. She taught him how to survive, where to find dates, potatoes and tomatoes – some of the only edible food on the island – as well as which plants to use for medicine and where to find fresh water high up in the mountains. Ellai says his life hasn’t changed much in the last 60-odd years, except he now proudly owns an “old-fashioned” mobile phone and has the luxury of bottled water. 

In 2015, Cyclone Chapala ripped through Yemen and the Horn of Africa. Most of nearby Qalansiyah was torn to pieces. Yet, Ellai followed his instincts and brought his family to the cave from Qalinsiyah, seeking refuge in its deeper caverns. The ensuing storm, he described, sounded like “the gods fighting with all the Earth’s elements”, and after a few days he emerged thinking he might have been the only man left on Socotra. “My cave was our saviour and it withstood more than the man-made buildings.” 

He explained that there is a network of deep tunnels and caverns connected to his cave. In the early 2000s, a Belgian archaeological team, the Socotra Karst Project, approached Ellai in his cave, asking if they could excavate some of these deeper tunnels. One 8m-long tunnel, which was so small Ellai could barely squeeze through it, opened into a huge chamber where the team found cave paintings that archaeologist Julian Jansen van Rensburg believed could be 2,000 years old, as well as human skulls and ancient pottery. 

“Socotra’s history doesn’t belong to books,” Ellai said. “It belongs to memories, art and objects, and this cave has been a living record for longer than I can imagine.”



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Send us a tip on your favourite UK island to win a holiday | Travel


There’s something romantic about islands – the escape from the rest of the world, the proximity to the sea – and we want to hear about your favourite in the UK. Whether it’s a rugged Scottish isle or a golden-sanded gem in the Isles of Scilly, tell us why you love it: the beaches, the wildlife, sense of isolation, maybe just the thrill of getting there …

If you have a relevant photo, do send it in – but it’s your words that will be judged for the competition.

Keep your tip to about 100 words

The best tip of the week, chosen by Tom Hall of Lonely Planet, will win a £200 voucher to stay at a Sawday’s property – the company has more than 3,000 in the UK and Europe. The best tips will appear on the Guardian Travel website, and maybe in the paper, too.

We’re sorry, but for legal reasons you must be a UK resident to enter this competition.

The competition closes on 13 July at 9am BST

Have a look at our past winners and other tips

Read the terms and conditions here

If you’re having trouble using the form, click here. Read terms of service here



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