Backpacking safety tips and best gear for enjoying the outdoors


While the past couple of years have been trying, at best, it has given us time to recognize, reevaluate and, in some instances, readjust the undesirable patterns we’ve fallen into. One benefit to our altered lifestyle is it has increased outdoor activities, such as hiking, backpacking and camping.

Although getting fresh air and being more active is a good thing, there are a few risks involved with outdoor adventuring. If you’re new to backpacking, you will benefit from a few safety tips and gear recommendations.

Hiking vs. backpacking

It’s normal to categorize similar activities into the same broader categories. It helps keep things simple and organized. Drawing and painting are both artistic pursuits, for instance. However, each has its own specifics that make it unique. Just like hiking and backpacking.

Hiking

Hiking is a vigorous activity. You walk along trails and often challenging terrains for purposes such as exploring, communing with nature, getting away from the hustle and bustle, exercising or just relaxing. It can be done alone or in groups. And you can do it in a single day.

Backpacking

Backpacking is nearly the same thing as hiking. You do all the same things for all the same reasons. The critical difference with backpacking is it lasts more than a single day. Backpacking is a form of independent travel that involves carrying all of your provisions with you on your back. It doesn’t matter if you sleep in a tent in the middle of the wilderness or you plot a route that takes you to a new lodging each night, both are considered backpacking.

Benefits of backpacking

Besides being an economical way to explore the world around you, there are many health benefits to backpacking. According to the Mayo Clinic, just the act of walking (without a backpack) can help you maintain healthy body weight, strengthen your bones and muscles, increase your energy levels, elevate your mood, improve your balance and coordination, strengthen your immune system, reduce stress and more. Additionally, backpacking is an earth-friendly activity. If done conscientiously, you will leave a very small carbon footprint behind.

What to consider before backpacking

If you are new to backpacking, before embarking on your first journey, be sure your fitness level is suitable for the activity. Hiking a few miles in one day can leave you tired and achy. If you are backpacking, you will need to repeat this activity day after day.

Before attempting your first multiday trip, check in with your doctor to get the thumbs-up. Then devote some time to building up your stamina with daily walks. Also, in the beginning, consider mapping out a route that has minimal miles to travel between stops and is on relatively flat terrain. As your body adapts to the activity, you can plot more challenging trips.

Safety tips for backpacking

Before you leave

  • Take a class. Consider taking a class or two on hiking, backpacking, wilderness survival, first-aid, or anything that will educate you on what to expect and what to do when backpacking.
  • Plot a route. Create a detailed itinerary of how far you will travel each day, where you plan to stop to rest and what your final destination is.
  • Inform others of your plans. Before leaving for your adventure, leave your detailed plans with someone who is not going backpacking with you.
  • Check the weather. The weather is constantly in flux. Check before you travel to make sure you are prepared. 
  • Make a gear list. Don’t just hope you will remember everything you need to bring. Create a checklist days or weeks in advance to make sure you do not forget any essentials. Include all medications on that list, such as allergy pills or anything else you take daily.
  • Pack a first-aid kit. Pack a comprehensive but compact first-aid kit.
  • Bring bear spray. If you are backpacking through the wilderness, make sure to bring bear spray. It is the most effective way to stop an attack.
  • Bring a physical map and a compass. If you lose service or power, having a physical map and a compass on hand (that you know how to read and use) can be a lifesaver.
  • Create a backup plan. If there’s a problem, have a way out. This could be anything from an alternate route to packing an emergency beacon.

During your journey

  • Backpack with a buddy. While it isn’t unheard of to backpack alone, whenever possible, do it with a friend.
  • Stick to the plan. If you made a plan and informed others, stick to that plan. If you don’t, and something happens, you will be much more difficult to find.
  • Stay away from poison ivy. Identify and avoid brushing against all plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, that have oils that cause an adverse reaction.
  • Stay hydrated. Not staying properly hydrated can cause many problems, from headaches to fatigue and cramps. After three days, dehydration can become life-threatening.
  • Stay fueled. Without fuel, you will run out of energy. Eat smart to keep your strength up.
  • Be wary of strangers. While crime is rare on trails, it does happen. If you are alone, be cautious.
  • Do not engage with wildlife. If you stumble upon an animal, in many cases, the best strategy is to not appear threatening and slowly back away. Do not run or startle the animal.

Best gear for backpacking

Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Southwest 55L Backpack

Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Southwest 55L Backpack

This ultralight backpack has removable aluminum stays for rigidity. It is breathable, has a roll-top closure to keep out precipitation and has external pockets for items you need to access frequently. 

Sold by Backcountry

Garmin inReach Mini 2 Compact Satellite Communicator

Garmin inReach Mini 2 Compact Satellite Communicator

You want to be prepared for emergencies. This compact satellite communicator has two-way messaging, an SOS and TracBack routing, so you can always return to where you came from. In tracking mode, the battery can last up to 14 days.

Sold by Amazon

Counter Assault Bear Spray

Counter Assault Bear Spray

When you’re in trouble, you don’t want an adequate bear spray. You want the best. This canister sprays up to 40 feet for eight seconds at maximum strength. It comes with a quick-access holster, so the spray is always within reach.

Sold by Amazon

Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles

Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles

These lightweight trekking poles are made of durable, aircraft-grade aluminum alloy. The cork handles add comfort, while the tungsten carbide tips provide secure trekking. Each 10.4-ounce pole extends from 26 to 54 inches.

Sold by Amazon and Dick’s Sporting Goods

Sawyer Products Squeeze Water Filtration System

Sawyer Products Squeeze Water Filtration System

Fresh drinking water is essential. This water filtration system ensures you will never run out as long as there is a nearby natural water source. It can filter out bacteria, protozoa and microplastics. It comes with a reusable 16-ounce, BPA-free collapsible pouch, two adapters, a straw and a syringe filter cleaner.

Sold by Amazon

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Allen Foster writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their purchasing decisions, saving them time and money. 
 

Copyright 2022 BestReviews, a Nexstar company. All rights reserved.



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Tips for volunteering in the outdoors


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Wanted: Camp hosts to serve one month or more at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in south-central Oregon. Duties: welcoming campers and visitors; sharing information about the area; and light maintenance, repairs and cleanup at campgrounds and restrooms. Applicants should be outdoorsy, outgoing and open to living in a remote setting. (The closest Walmart is about 160 miles away.) Camp or hook up your RV at no cost in exchange for 32 hours of service a week. In your free time, hike amid rugged cliffs and sharp ridges, soak in hot springs and spot wildlife — namely, 3,000-plus pronghorn antelope, along with sage grouse, bighorn sheep and hundreds of other species.

If that sounds tempting, it is, indeed, a real opportunity every year via the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). “It’s one of the most beautiful places you’ll be,” says Shannon Ludwig, refuge manager for Hart Mountain. “Many things haven’t changed in our part of the world,” even after settlers arrived. “That’s what’s so special about it.” (The 2022 camp host roles were recently filled but will be posted again for 2023 at volunteer.gov.)

In 2021, more than 16,000 people volunteered for duties that kept FWS national refuges and national fish hatcheries across the country running smoothly. And that’s just one of the many agencies and nonprofits connecting volunteers with the great outdoors, whether they’re working on organic farms, living in lighthouse keepers’ quarters, building “castles” for oysters, welcoming campers to campgrounds and so much more. Travelers interviewed for this story say they’ve found meaning and community in exchange for their time and talents through volunteering.

In 2005, Keith and Brenda Krejci retired and traded their home in Dayton, Ohio, for the RV life. Along the way, they’ve found that volunteering offers a nice change of pace in their travels, allowing them to meet people and learn while hooking up their RV at no charge. They’ve done stints with FWS, the Bureau of Land Management, the Nature Conservancy and state park systems, sometimes for months at a time.

Since May 1, they’ve been volunteering with the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, where, as interpretive hosts, they talk to visitors about marine mammals, shorebirds and tide pools.

“We’re issued these wonderful $3,000 spotting scopes — binoculars — and given all the equipment we need. And we’ll set up where we think there’s an opportunity for people to see seals, sea lions, oystercatchers, things like that, and let people get a really close view,” says Keith, 75. “And then we’ll explain to them what they’re seeing and answer any questions they have.” They’ll do this for about six hours a day, four days a week, in exchange for an RV hookup until Sept. 1. “We find we work more hours than required, because it’s just so enjoyable,” Keith says.

Want a seasonal job at a national park? Here’s what you should know.

Donna Carmon, 53, and Kevin Wade, 58 aren’t quite ready for the RV life; they both work full time and are engaged to be married, but they live in separate households. Still, they’ve been able to sample camper cohabitation for the past two years through a volunteer opportunity with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Every weekend for six months out of the year, they commute about 30 miles west of Carmon’s home near Kansas City, Kan., and live in their camper at a campground near Clinton Lake, at no charge, in exchange for 20 hours of volunteering per week. Carmon works at the visitor center, while Wade handles maintenance duties around the park. In their free time, they boat, fish, hike and make friends at the campground. “There’s farm fields, quiet, cows, the lake, and it’s just beautiful,” says Carmon, who learned about volunteering during a camping visit. “And we see deer every evening. Oh, it’s just spectacular.”

Heather Burke, the national partnership and volunteer program manager with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, says volunteers are critical to the agency’s sites in 43 states. They help with interpretation and education programs, fish and wildlife habitat improvements, invasive species management, trail construction and maintenance, photography and more. “Last year, we had more than 18,000 volunteers serving 1.56 million hours,” Burke says. “And that equates to about 750 full-time employees.”

As a volunteer at the lighthouse keepers’ quarters at Cape Lookout National Seashore in North Carolina, Susan Burke, 74, says the most common question she gets is, “How did you get your job?”

It’s actually a gig through the National Park Service that she found while perusing volunteer.gov four years ago. For two to three weeks a year, she travels to the undeveloped barrier islands and lives in a historic home where lighthouse keepers lived called the keepers’ quarters. By day, she greets visitors who arrive by ferry and boat and talks about the history of the lighthouse and lightkeepers. When the last passenger ferry leaves, she embraces the quiet. “It’s the best of both worlds,” she says. “When the ferry comes and the visitors come, they’re all excited to be here, and they’re having fun. And then they all leave at 6 o’clock at night. And I have the place to myself.”

The volunteer opportunities available through the National Park Service are as different as the parks themselves, including both run-of-the-mill duties (picking up trash) and intriguing endeavors (babysitting turtle nests on a beach). Shari Orr, the national manager of the agency’s volunteer program, says nearly 300,000 volunteers a year play an essential role. Because of the pandemic, many regular volunteers have been unable to serve. “A lot of parks are actually rebuilding their volunteer programs right now,” Orr says. “There’s a huge need for new volunteers to come in or previous volunteers to reengage.” Visit nps.gov/getinvolved/volunteer or volunteer.gov to see what’s available.

From working the fields to reef restoration

Imagine rising with the sun — and roosters — to a farm-fresh breakfast and spending your day in nature, learning to milk cows and tend crops. The nonprofit Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) (wwoofusa.org) connects the farm-curious with agricultural activities, including on urban farms in Detroit or biodynamic vineyards in Northern California. Volunteers work about a half-day approximately five days a week alongside the host in exchange for meals and accommodations, which can include whimsical treehouses or modest rooms in a farmer’s home. Aside from an annual WWOOF membership fee ($40 single, $65 joint), no money is exchanged.

National parks and forests bring back reservation systems to control crowds

Most new members haven’t set foot on a farm before, and they’re often surprised but energized by the experience, says Tori Fetrow, outreach and marketing manager with WWOOF. “I think people go into it with their own idea of what farm life might look like, but when they get there, it’s a little bit dirtier, it’s a little bit harder than what they expected,” Fetrow says. “But it’s really exciting, and you find yourself doing these things that you never expected to.”

The Nature Conservancy (nature.org) is an environmental conservation nonprofit founded by volunteers, and it continues to depend on them. “It’s really rooted in our DNA,” says Karen Tharp, director of Nature Allies, the conservancy’s volunteer and community program.

Some of the outdoor opportunities inspire intense wanderlust — such as the chance to spend six months conducting research and helping out at a remote research station at Palmyra Atoll in the Pacific Ocean, about 1,000 miles south of Hawaii. Or, on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, near the town of Wachapreague, building “oyster castles,” which are structures made of concrete where oysters can live that help to protect the land from storm damage and waves.

Tharp says volunteering in nature gives people a sense of satisfaction and meaning. “We live in a time where we’ve got climate change looming, we’ve got environmental justice issues brimming, and people are just looking for tangible ways to do something, to give back,” she says. “So they feel like they can be part of that solution.”

Silver is a writer based in Chicago. Find her on Twitter: @K8Silver.

Potential travelers should take local and national public health directives regarding the pandemic into consideration before planning any trips. Travel health notice information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s interactive map showing travel recommendations by destination and the CDC’s travel health notice webpage.





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Enjoy the great outdoors at the WNY Sport & Travel Expo


HAMBURG, N.Y. — Whether you’re an avid hunter and fisher or you’re just looking to enjoy the wilderness, there’s an event on Thursday where you can learn some tips and tricks from the experts.

The WNY Sport & Travel Expo is taking place at the Hamburg Fairgrounds.

There are more than 100 exhibitors with plenty of hunting gear and fishing rods for all different species of fish.

Take a walk on the wild side and let kids get up close and personal with geckos or play with some birds of prey at Bwana Jim’s Wildlife Show.  

You can try your luck at the indoor trout pond or book your next outdoor adventure for fishing charters with our neighbors to the north or right in Western New York.

The event has been running for more than 10 years and organizers say they’re excited to show off all there is to do outside in the region.

“We weren’t able to do it last year but we’re really excited this year,” said Mark Concilla, event promoter. “As we have people coming through the door with smiles on their faces and just just the excitement of being here to be able to talk to people about their experience and things to do in the outdoors.”

The WNY Sport & Travel Expo runs through Sunday at the Hamburg Fairgrounds. 

For more information or to buy tickets, click here.





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February 4 Outdoors Digest Calendar Fishing Hunting reports tip


Calendar

Through Feb. 6 – Oklahoma white-fronted goose season.

Through Feb. 13 – Texas West Zone light and dark goose season.

Through Feb. 13 – Oklahoma light and dark goose seasons.

Through Feb. 15 – Oklahoma quail season.

Through Feb. 27 – Texas quail hunting season.

Through March 13 – Texas East Zone Light Goose Conservation Order Season.

Feb. 14-March 13 – Texas West Zone Light Goose Conservation Order Season.

Feb. 14-March 30 – Oklahoma Light Goose Conservation Order Season.

Feb. 1 – Monthly meeting of the Red River Fly Fishers at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park. For information, visit www.rrff.org .

Feb. 5 – 2022 Red River Fly Fisher’s “Red River Rendezvous” at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park.

Feb. 5-6 – Bassmaster Kayak Series tournament at Lake Fork. For info, visit www.bassmaster.com .

Feb. 19 – 23rd annual Youth Trout Derby at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond. For information, visit www.CityofDenison.com/parksrec or call (903) 465-2720. during business hours.

Feb. 19 – Red River Valley Ducks Unlimited Dinner at the Gainesville Civic Center.

Feb. 19-24 – Bass Pro Tour Stage Two tournament in Quitman, Texas at Lake Fork. For information, visit www.majorleaguefishing.com .

Feb. 26-27 – 5th annual Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival at the Mesquite Convention Center. For information, visit https://txflyfishingfestival.org .

Feb. 27 – Fourth TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Feb. 27 – TPWD trout stocking at Sherman’s Pebblebrook Community Park Pond.

March 4-6 – 52nd Bassmaster Classic on South Carolina’s Lake Hartwell. For information, visit www.bassmaster.com .

Notes

With big bass season off and running in January, red-hot O.H. Ivie produced another Legacy Class largemouth bass to close out the first month of the 2022 Toyota ShareLunker season. TPWD reports in a news release that Brett Cannon of Willis, Texas, who reeled in ShareLunker 593 back in 2021, got back on the program’s leaderboard on Thursday Jan. 27 to become the second angler this season to catch a Legacy Lunker in back-to-back campaigns. Josh Jones, who caught two ShareLunkers a year ago, brought 14.13-pound ShareLunker 612 into his boat earlier in the month, also at O.H. Ivie again….TPWD says that the month of January saw six total ShareLunkers caught by anglers from across the nation, five of which were from O.H. Ivie that boasted 12 in 2021. The six Lunkers last month also outpaced last year’s January total of four in a season that eventually produced 23 ShareLunkers at 10 different lakes across the state. Last year’s effort was the most during a January-through-March timespan since the 1995 ShareLunker season, which produced 27 fish for the long-running TPWD program. FYI, last year, five of the 23 ShareLunker entries were greater than 15 pounds. So far this season, one fish has already bested the 15-pound mark…The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has reported in a news release that invasive quagga mussels have been detected for the first time in the Lone Star State. The release indicates that the quagga mussel discovery was made by National Park Service (NPS) staff at the International Amistad Reservoir in the Rio Grande basin along the Texas-Mexico border near Del Rio. According to TPWD, quagga mussels are a close relative of the zebra mussel, which has invaded 33 Texas lakes across six river basins since it was first introduced in Texas in Lake Texoma in 2009. In addition to being the first detection of quagga mussels in Texas waters, this is also the first finding of any invasive mussel species in the Rio Grande basin…“This detection of invasive quagga mussels is a very unfortunate first for Texas,” said Monica McGarrity, TPWD Senior Scientist for Aquatic Invasive Species, in the news release. “Quagga mussels can inhabit greater depths and are also able to settle on soft substrates like mud or sand in addition to hard surfaces like rock or infrastructure—unlike zebra mussels—meaning they can colonize more of the lake.”…Obviously, given the depth that quagga mussels can live in, the discovery of this invasive species is not welcome news in Texas. “Quagga mussels are very prolific and can form larger populations that can have greater effects on the lake ecosystem overall, especially in deep lakes,” McGarrity said in the news release. “Even the lakes that already have zebra mussels are at risk of having quagga mussels introduced and monitoring of these lakes for signs of quagga mussels will be necessary.”… The 2022 professional bass fishing season kicked off last weekend at Sam Rayburn Reservoir. Cold water, a day so windy that it scrubbed a round of competition, and the time of the year weren’t enough to keep Michael Neal from living up to his nickname of being the “Real Deal.” The reigning Bass Pro Tour Angler of the Year won his second event in fourth months with a final day effort of 25-pounds, 5-ounce limit that included an 8-pound, 9-ounce kicker fish. lived up to his nickname. Today, he once again was the “Real Deal.” All of that enabled Neal to grab his second major title in recent weeks as he won the Tackle Warehouse Pro Circuit Presented by Fuel Me event on Sam Rayburn and claimed the event’s $102,500 top prize. “It’s all momentum,” said Neal in a press release. “Winning Angler of the Year and then my first tournament in a catch-all-you-can-catch format (the Bass Pro Tour event on St. Clair) and now winning my first five-fish format event. It’s just momentum.” Obviously, the momentum worked in the five-fish event that is the former FLW Tour. And Neal was obviously comfortable in that format. “I think coming back to the circuit where I got my start, it’s come full circle. This one might be the most special of the three.”… The Bass Pro Tour kicks off its 2022 season next week with the B&W Trailer Hitches Stage One event on Caney Creek, Lake D’Arbonne, and Bussey Brake water bodies near West Monroe, La. The BPT cancelled the first day of practice yesterday and extended the practice period for anglers through today because of the winter weather pushing through the southern U.S. But as of now, the event will begin on schedule on Saturday, Feb. 5. For details, visit www.majorleaguefishing.com… Thursday marked the first day of the St. Croix Bassmaster Southern Open at Kissimmee Chain, Florida. At press time, Cole Sands had the unofficial Day One lead at five fish tipping the scales at 15-pounds, 1-ounce. For full coverage, visit www.bassmaster.com…

Hunting Reports

Duck season ended with some good shooting in places last weekend. Once again, Dakota Stowers’ North Texas Outfitters Group found some good limit and near limit shooting on the final weekend due to some serious scouting chores. The NTO bunch found a banded Canada goose in one shoot, filmed a good television episode for Alps Outdoors, and saw a group of 300 lesser Canada geese land at 10-yards.  Bag limits had mallards, pintails, gadwalls, teal, divers, and Canada geese in them on the NTO shoots out near Wichita Falls and Waurika, Okla….Meanwhile, traveling east along the Red River to Choctaw County in southeastern Oklahoma, Doug Rodgers, his son Evan, and some friends ended the season with a bang at B.C. Wetlands. Rodgers said the shoot they experienced was nothing short of epic: “We finished the season strong and our group harvested 30 ducks before 9:30 a.m. last weekend. It was probably the best duck hunt I’ve ever experienced anyplace, including in Arkansas. They were dive bombing us and wouldn’t quit hitting the decoy spread.”…Rodgers said that their final weekend bag limits included mallards, wood ducks, and green-winged teal on the SE Oklahoma timber shoot…While those good hunts were reported to end the 2021-22 season, other reports weren’t as glowing and some hunters struggled once again to find decent duck shooting. Some hunters and guides described the season as a long grind and among the most difficult ones they have experienced…Looking ahead to next fall and winter, duck hunters start hoping and praying that the drought in southern Canada and the northern U.S. will start going away and that breeding conditions will improve from last year’s very dry spring…On the hunting season front, there is still some late goose hunting in Oklahoma and the Texas West Zone, along with quail seasons continuing into parts of this month on both sides of the Red River….There’s also small game hunting opportunities for rabbits and squirrels, something that you’ll see a story or two about in the weeks to come…

Fishing Reports

Anglers, keep in mind that all fishing reports this week came before the arrival of the arctic cold front and winter storm currently sweeping across Oklahoma and Texas. In addition to dangerous on-the-water conditions and difficult travel today and some of this weekend, most reports will change greatly after this early February siege of snow, ice, and bitter cold…At Lake Texoma, water is lightly stained; water temps are 45-48 degrees; and the lake is 1.00 feet low. Guide John Blasingame of Adventure Texoma Outdoors tells TPWD that the striped bass are good in 18-25 feet of water on structure. Use Alabama-rigs and in open water, use swimbaits and dead-sticking to bring in larger fish…On the Oklahoma side of Texoma, ODWC game warden Garrett Beam says that striper fishing has been good this past week. The Bryan County warden says that striped bass are good on Alabama-rigs, flukes, live bait, live shad, sassy shad and slabs along channels, main lake and points. Stripers are being caught right now dead-sticking. They are being caught north of the Roosevelt Bridge and on the eastern part of the lake. Blue, channel and flathead catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait, dough bait, goldfish, hot dogs, live shad, punch bait, stink bait and sunfish along channels, docks, points and river channel. Blue cats are being caught on live shad near the oil rigs in the flats. Crappie fair on grubs, hair jigs, jigs, minnows, nymphs and PowerBait around brush structure, coves, docks, points and standing timber. Crappie are being caught right now on docks and near brush piles…At Lake Ray Roberts, water is lightly stained; water temp is 50 degrees; and the lake is 01.01 feet low. TPWD says that bitter cold weather is forecasted and the fish should move to deeper water. White bass continue to be fair on silver spoons leading up the cold front. Crappie are slow on transitioning towards the upcoming springtime spawn…At Lake Fork, water is lightly stained; water temp is 52 degrees; and the lake is 6.36 feet low as repair work continues on the dam. TPWD says that guides Marc Mitchell and Jason Hoffman both report a slow bass bite due to the weather. Low water is also an issue as the work on the reservoir’s dam continues. For those who do get out, Viper XP jigs in purple passion are good in 5-7 feet of water around creeks and big wooded areas. Z-man Chatterbaits are also working in the same areas when worked slowly. Suspending jerkbaits have also produced some success near points in 6-8 feet of water…Meanwhile, Lake Fork crappie are good scattered in 35-40 feet of water as they start pushing north in the lake towards shallower spawning areas. Guide Jacky Wiggins tells TPWD that minnows are producing the best bite, with some catches on jigs also taking place…At the Blue River near Tishomingo, ODWC reports that fishing for rainbow trout is excellent on midges, nymphs, PowerBait and spoons fished along stream channels and near rocks…On the Upper Texas Gulf Coast, TPWD says that anglers should be aware that this week’s big cold front with rain, freezing rain, sleet, and colder weather is going to affect the coastal fishing action. TPWD says that black drum, redfish, and a few sheepshead mixed in, are holding in the river near Bessie Heights and are biting on shrimp and Carolina-rigs. Flounder are starting to move into the river as well…On the Middle Coast at Port O’Connor, guide Capt. Marty Medford of Captain Marty’s Fish of a Lifetime tells TPWD that the cold weather may have an effect on fishing in the next several days, but up until the front, the big jetties are holding the fish. Sheepshead are excellent for those anglers using live shrimp. Redfish are good on voodoo root beer shrimp. Black drum are good on dead shrimp. Trout are slow…And finally, down south on the Lower Coast at South Padre Island and Port Isabel, guide Capt. Lou Austin tells TPWD that redfish rule the day right now. Limits are coming along to the north of the island. Trout, redfish, sheepshead, and mangrove snapper are hitting on the drop-offs near the grain docks at the end of the Brownsville Channel. Capt. Austin tells TPWD that the fish are biting glow with chartreuse tail baits. Right now, the live bait is off on the southern coast…

Tip of the Week

Big bass season is off to another blazing start in Texas with six ShareLunker Legacy Class bass being caught last month! If you catch the bass of a lifetime over the next few weeks, consider helping ensure future bass fishing success across the state of Texas by participating in the annual TPWD Toyota ShareLunker program. According to TPWD, anglers who catch a 13-pound or better bass during the first three months of the season (Jan. 1 through March 31) can loan their big bass to TPWD for the ShareLunker selective breeding and stocking program. These anglers can call the ShareLunker hotline at (903) 681-0550 to report their catch 24/7 until April 1.



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Union library to host outdoors, travel writer via Zoom


Carey Kish of Mount Desert Island, an outdoors and travel writer, as well as a veteran hiker and backpacker with more than 20,000 trail miles under his boots, will give a Zoom talk at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 2, hosted by Vose Library in Union. Submitted photo

Vose Library plans to host Carey Kish for its next Vose or Virtual Wednesday session, scheduled for 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 2, via Zoom.

Closed captioning will be available.

Kish, of Mount Desert Island, is an outdoors and travel writer, veteran hiker and backpacker with more than 20,000 trail miles under his boots. His hiking and camping column has appeared in the Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram for two decades, and his writing and photographs can be found in numerous print and online publications.

The author of “AMC’s Best Day Hikes Along the Maine Coast” and editor of the “AMC Maine Mountain Guide,” Kish’s latest book is “Beer Hiking New England,” a guide to 50 hikes paired with 50 craft breweries around the six-state region, will be available this spring, according to a news release from the library.

The Appalachian Trail has captured the imagination of hikers for more than 80 years, and for those intrepid souls who make the grueling 2,189-mile trek from end-to-end, it is unquestionably the adventure of a lifetime, the news release notes.

One AT thru-hike is enough for most, but not for Kish, who in 2015 at age 56, decided that twice was better (his first AT hike was in 1977).

Kish will describe in words and images his 189-day journey, which began in March on Springer Mountain, Georgia and ended in October atop Maine’s Mt. Katahdin. People can learn about the trail’s history, the mountain scenery, the camaraderie of fellow hikers, the trail towns and trail angels, wildlife encounters, and the highs and lows of putting one foot in front of the other for six long months.

For a Zoom registration link, call 207-785-4733, email [email protected] or stop by Vose Library, 392 Common Road in Union.



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Travel news latest: Skiers must wear masks outdoors as Austria tightens Covid restrictions


Austria has tightened its Covid-19 measures, including the requirement to wear a face mask outdoors, as omicron continues to spread across Europe.  

From Saturday, an FFP2 mask must be worn outdoors where a distance of 2m cannot be guaranteed. This will affect Austrian ski resorts, where social distancing of this sort is difficult.  

Proof of vaccination will be also required in all shops in Austria from next week, and the validity of vaccine certificates has been cut to six months.  

Austria reported 8,269 Covid-19 cases on Thursday – triple the daily average last week.   

A wave of infection continues to spread across the Continent. On Wednesday, France reported more than 330,000 daily cases and Italy yesterday reported a record 219,000 daily cases.  

Scroll down for more updates.





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December 24 Outdoors Digest Calendar Fishing Hunting reports tip


Calendar

Through Dec. 29 – Oklahoma dove season second split.

Through Jan. 2 – Texas North Zone second split of dove season.

Through Jan. 2 – Texas North Zone general whitetail season.

Through Jan. 2 – General whitetail season in Grayson and Collin Counties with the means and method of take restricted to lawful archery and crossbow gear.

Through Jan. 15 – Oklahoma archery deer season.

Through Jan. 16 – Texas South Zone general whitetail season.

Through Jan. 30 – Texas North Zone duck season second split.

Through Jan. 30 – Oklahoma Zone 2 duck season second split.

Through Jan. 31 – Texas woodcock season.

Through Feb. 15 – Oklahoma quail season.

Through Feb. 27 – Texas quail hunting season.

Jan. 4 – Monthly meeting of the Red River Fly Fishers at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park. For information, visit www.rrff.org .

Jan. 7 – Second TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Jan. 8 – 15th annual City of Denison Howard Caylor Trout Derby at Waterloo Lake Park Pond. For information, call (903) 465-2720 (extension 2034) or visit the city of Denison’s website at http://www.cityofdenison.com/parksrec .

Jan. 30 – Third TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Feb. 1 – Monthly meeting of the Red River Fly Fishers at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park. For information, visit www.rrff.org .

Feb. 5 – 2022 Red River Fly Fisher’s “Red River Rendezvous” at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park.

Feb. 26-27 – 5th annual Texas Fly Fishing & Brew Festival at the Mesquite Convention Center. For information, visit https://txflyfishingfestival.org.

Feb. 27 – Fourth TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Feb. 27 – TPWD trout stocking at Sherman’s Pebblebrook Community Park Pond.

Notes

On this Christmas Eve morning, allow the Herald Democrat Outdoors staff to wish you, your family, and your friends a very Merry Christmas! And thanks for reading!…Since 2012, the Game Warden Peace Officer’s Association has been working to relocate its memorial from the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens to the grounds of the Texas State Capitol. According to a TPWD news release, the life-size bronze figure of a Texas Game Warden stands to honor the Texas game wardens that have lost their lives in the line of duty as well as serving as a reminder of the enduring legacy of wardens across the Lone Star State. “The Association saw this as a necessary move since other memorials—specifically peace officer memorials—are housed on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol,” said Game Warden Peace Officer Association president and current Texas game warden Major Quint Balkcom, in the release. “Housing the memorial on Capitol grounds would also serve a larger audience, many who have never interacted with a Texas game warden. This is an educational opportunity to learn more about our history and our critical conservation efforts.” When the Game Warden Peace Officer’s Association took the reins of this project, they also facilitated the necessary funding and legislative efforts required for relocation according to TPWD. After multiple attempts, a 2017 resolution in support of the project passed through both chambers of the Texas legislature. And last week’s hearing of the State Preservation Board cleared any remaining logistical hurdles that had stalled relocation. “This is an incredible step in the right direction,” said Colonel Chad Jones, director of law enforcement for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “The fallen wardens this memorial honors aren’t just the wardens of the past. Some of them were my friends and colleagues. Placing the memorial at the Capitol ensures their sacrifices will be remembered daily by the leaders, residents, and visitors to this state.”…TPWD notes that despite overcoming monumental hurdles, the memorial still faces an uphill battle to reach its final home. “Now that the project has received final approval from the State Preservation Board, we have moved into the planning phase of relocation which will be a lengthy process as well,” said Balkcom in the news release. “Ordering the granite for a new pedestal and physically moving the memorial takes months to plan and perform, but I am thrilled the project is one step closer to its new home and honoring our fallen family the way it was intended.” Balkom also added that an updated sculpture will be replacing the memorial in Athens in the future…Did you know? As the state’s only conservation law enforcement agency, TPWD’s game wardens patrol a vast network of waterways across Texas, respond to natural disasters, and oversee hunting and fishing regulations statewide. Through the agency’s 125 year history, a total of 19 Texas game wardens have lost their lives while serving the people of Texas…ODWC reports that the Sooner State’s 2021 holiday antlerless deer gun season opened up in specific zones on Dec. 18 and runs through Dec. 31. And once again, the agency is reminding everyone that “Hunters in the Know … Take a Doe!” …ODWC says that every hunter who participates in the holiday season may harvest two bonus antlerless white-tailed deer, even if the hunter has already harvested the maximum aggregate limit of six deer for all other current deer seasons…The holiday season in Oklahoma runs 14 days in all open zones, providing ample time for hunters to get out and help manage the state’s deer herd by increasing the antlerless deer harvest…Dallas Barber, big game biologist for ODWC, is hoping hunters will respond and help create a more balanced buck-to-doe ratio in the state’s deer population…ODWC notes that it’s big game biologists have a goal for overall antlerless harvest between 40 and 45-percent for all seasons combined. Heading into this year’s holiday season, so far, only about 37-percent of the statewide deer harvest in 2021 has been antlerless deer. So, Barber is hopeful the holiday season will push antlerless harvest over the agency’s 40-percent goal…Why is such a higher antlerless harvest necessary? ODWC says that it yields several benefits including an improved buck-to-doe ration, which brings a healthier overall herd in the state; promotes better antler growth by reducing competition for forage; prevents localized deer overpopulation; reduces the potential for damaging and potentially deadly deer/vehicle collisions; and lessens the extent of potential crop depredation problems across the state’s agricultural lands…

Hunting Reports

Despite this being Christmas Eve, most reports indicate that hunting is slow over much of the Red River Valley due to the unusually mild weather here and to the north…On the whitetail hunting front, there have been few if any recent reports of bucks being tagged by archers in Grayson County…On the duck hunting front, Dakota Stowers and his North Texas Outfitters are still putting clients on mixed bag hunts in southern Oklahoma, but he admits that many are having to work hard to find huntable concentrations of birds on area tanks and small lakes…There’s no recent update on quail hunting in Texas and Oklahoma, nor is there any report on woodcock hunting in East Texas, where the season for timberdoodles opened up a few days ago…Looking for a good, different hunt with family and friends over the Christmas holidays? Then don’t forget that the second split of dove season continues in Oklahoma through Dec. 29 and in the Texas North Zone through Jan. 2…Also, don’t overlook small game hunting options for rabbits and squirrels in North Texas. Check the TPWD website for full details and regulations…While deer hunting is slow as the season winds towards its conclusion on Sunday, Jan. 2, 2022, don’t forget that several of Grayson County’s biggest bucks have been tagged over the holidays and in the final few days of the season…Right now, hunting food sources is your best option unless a yearling doe proves the secondary rut is true and a buck chases her through a bottleneck area in front of your stand…Buck sightings might be slow in the unusually warm weather, but you can’t tag a whopper whitetail sitting in front of the Christmas tree!…

Fishing Reports

As Christmas weekend arrives at Lake Texoma, the water remains lightly stained, the water temp is 56 degrees, and the lake is 1.21-feet low. While there probably won’t be much fishing as families gather for the Dec. 25th holiday and travel far and wide across the state. But for those who do get out in the mild weather conditions, the current striped bass fishing at Lake Texoma is rated as excellent according to guide John Blasingame of Adventure Texoma Outdoors. He tells TPWD in its weekly fishing report that stripers are good in the main lake on Alabama-rigs, with the larger fish biting on swimbaits tossed around structure. The dead stick bite is also producing as jolly old St. Nicholas flies into town tonight.…At Lake Ray Roberts, site of the 51st Bassmaster Classic earlier in the year, TPWD says that crappie are good on main lake brush piles in 20-30 feet of water on minnows. The agency says that the bigger slabs remain in the Buck Creek area in the standing timber around 20-foot depths, with bait suspended in the 10-12-foot range…At Lake Fork, where water is being steadily drawn to reduce the lake level for work on the dam, water is lightly stained; water temps are 62-64 degrees; and the lake is 4.36 feet low and falling. Fork guides Jason Hoffman and Marc Mitchell tell TPWD that largemouth bass are good using suspending jerkbaits along drop-offs and ditches in 6-10-feet of water. Slow rolling spinnerbaits are also working in these same areas work also. The veteran Fork guides also note that Viper XP jigs in black and blue are also working against big timber found along the creeks and ditches in 7-10-feet of water. Finally, Shakyheads are also working in these areas with a four-inch Ring Fry as the bait. The guides say good luck and Merry Christmas to all! Meanwhile, the crappie bite at Lake Fork is good between the 154 and 515 bridges on creek channels according to Jack Wiggins of Jack Wiggins Guide Service. He tells TPWD that the slabs are feeding up on bait, so they are shad and happy! The Fork guide says to fish deep in 45-55-feet of water with fish suspended around 20-30-foot depths, with the best action on top of the timber with minnows…At the Blue River, ODWC says that rainbow trout are good on in-line spinnerbaits, PowerBait and spoons cast along channel braids and rocks. In-line spinnerbaits and spoons have been working the best for catching trout, especially in metallic colors slowly retrieved just off the bottom. For fly fishers, try small streamer patterns, midges, and nymphs. ODWC says that trout are hugging the bottom and are in deeper pools because of how clear the water is and the lack of stream flow in the gathering drought conditions… If you’re heading for the Texas Gulf Coast over the Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays, Galveston Bay in the Houston area is one place to consider. TPWD quotes Capt. David Dillman of Galveston Bay Charter Fishing as saying that there are plenty of sheepshead around structures such as pier pilings, oyster reefs, and rocks. He says that live shrimp is the best bait for sheepshead right now. Meanwhile, speckled trout and redfish are being caught on the shorelines around Eagle Point and April Fool Point. In the jetties, fishing is the same song and dance according to the guide. Bull reds are also being caught on the bottom by anglers using fresh dead shad and crabs. A few oversized black drum are also mixed in. Anglers throwing live shrimp against the rocks are catching slot reds and sheepshead too…At Rockport, Damian Hubbs of Mathis Bait Company tells TPWD that redfish are good in 2-4-feet of water in sand pockets on gold spoons and cut bait. Speckled trout are good in 2-4-feet of water on Bass Assassins and topwaters fished early. Black drum are good on dead shrimp fished near drains on an outgoing tide. And flounder are good on Berkley’s Gulp baits fished on the edge of channels…At South Padre Island, Capt. Lou Austin tells TPWD that there is a good mix of redfish and speckled trout when anglers find them and can stay with them. Redfish have been really soft in their bite on live shrimp under popping corks and for those anchored and using cut mullet. The guide says that a good place to look for redfish is around the gas wells and near Three Islands. He’s also heard of a good bite in the Arroyo for those using cut mullet. Some are catching a lot of sand trout and some whiting too and sheepshead are being caught around the jetties and both causeways. Finally, Capt. Austin says be safe out there on the water since it’s gotten cold and Merry Christmas!…

Tip of the Week

As the city of Denison gets ready to celebrate the city’s Sesquicentennial Celebration next year, D-Town is getting ready to host the 15th annual Howard Caylor Trout Derby early in 2022. This upcoming event will take place from 9-11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 8, 2022 at Waterloo Lake Park Pond according to Andrew Means of the city’s Parks and Rec Department. Look for more details soon; call (903) 465-2720 (extension 2034) during business hours; or visit the city of Denison website at www.cityofdenison.com/parksrec .



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December 17 Outdoors Digest Calendar Fishing Hunting reports tip


Calendar

Through Dec. 29 – Oklahoma dove season second split.

Through Jan. 2 – Texas North Zone general whitetail season.

Through Jan. 2 – General whitetail season in Grayson and Collin Counties with the means and method of take restricted to lawful archery and crossbow gear.

Through Jan. 15 – Oklahoma archery deer season.

Through Jan. 16 – Texas South Zone general whitetail season.

Through Jan. 30 – Texas North Zone duck season second split.

Through Jan. 30 – Oklahoma Zone 2 duck season second split.

Through Feb. 15 – Oklahoma quail season.

Through Feb. 27 – Texas quail hunting season.

Dec. 17 – First TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Dec. 17 – Jan. 2 – Texas North Zone dove hunting second split.

Dec. 18-Jan. 31 – Texas woodcock season.

Jan. 4 – Monthly meeting of the Red River Fly Fishers at the Rec Hall at Eisenhower State Park. For information, visit www.rrff.org .

Jan. 7 – Second TPWD trout stocking at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond.

Jan. 8 – 15th annual City of Denison Howard Caylor Trout Derby at Waterloo Lake Park Pond. For information, call (903) 465-2720 (extension 2034) or visit the city of Denison’s website at http://www.cityofdenison.com/parksrec .

Notes

As the city of Denison gets ready to celebrate the city’s Sesquicentennial Celebration next year, D-Town is getting ready to host the 15th annual Howard Caylor Trout Derby early in 2022. This upcoming event will take place from 9-11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 8, 2022 at Waterloo Lake Park Pond according to Andrew Means of the city’s Parks and Rec Department. Look for more details soon; call (903) 465-2720 (extension 2034) during business hours; or visit the city of Denison website at www.cityofdenison.com/parksrec… Grayson County’s first local stockings of catchable size rainbow trout have been taking place this week. The first such TPWD stocking was on Tuesday, Dec. 14 at Pottsboro Lake while the second one will happen today on Dec. 17 at Denison’s Waterloo Lake Park Pond …Wintertime is also trophy catfish season in Texomaland and ODWC reports that such action is heating up on 89,000-acre Lake Texoma.  Blues, channel cats, and flatheads are all good on cut bait, dough bait, goldfish, hot dogs, live shad, punch bait, shad, stinkbait and sunfish right now according to ODWC. Look for big whiskerfish along creek channels, in coves, near docks, on the main lake, near points, and in the river channels. Blue cat action should continue to get better according to ODWC as the winter season continues, with a lot of success coming on juglines in 15-45-feet of water for those using live shad…Renowned bowhunter Chuck Adams has tagged another Pope and Young Club world record animal. The velvet racked Sitka Blacktail Deer was taken on Alaska’s Kodiak Island in August and was panel measured last week by P&Y measurers. To see more on Adams latest world record big game animal, visit http://www.bowhunter.com ….

Hunting Reports

With the post-rut continuing, there haven’t been many more reports of big deer since Texas DPS state trooper Tarif Alkhatib arrowed what might be a new county record typical buck last week. If you missed that news story in last Friday’s Herald Democrat Outdoors section, the big 12-point mainframe buck has a reported green gross score in the mid-190s and a reported green net score in the upper 170s…As the second split of duck season continues, Dakota Stowers and his North Texas Outfitters guides are finding good limit shoots in southern Oklahoma, although it is taking some good scouting every day to find concentrations of ducks pushing into the region despite the mild weather…As Christmas Day approaches, most area waterfowling success is seeing wingshooters getting a few mallards, gadwalls, wigeon, green-winged teal, pintails and diver ducks like canvasbacks, redheads, and ring-necked ducks…Don’t forget that there are a couple of additional wingshooting options coming up in parts of the area over the next several weeks. First, the 2021-22 woodcock season begins in Texas as it runs its course from Dec. 18 through Jan. 31. Also keep in mind that the second split of the 2021 Oklahoma dove season is underway and continues through Dec. 29 on the Sooner State side of the Red River…In Texas, the second split of dove season begins in the North Zone today on Friday, Dec. 17 and continues through Jan. 2…Quail season is underway in both Texas and Oklahoma and there are a few reports of success. In western Oklahoma though, conditions are dry, wildfires have been erupting with ease, and scenting action is difficult for pointing dogs…

Fishing Reports

As the Christmas holidays approach, fishing remains good on Lake Texoma according to guide John Blasingame of Adventure Texoma Outdoors. He tells TPWD that the water is lightly stained; water temp is 56 degrees; and the lake is 1.35 feet low. Striped bass are good in the main luck on Alabama rigs, with the larger fish biting on swimbaits thrown around structure. The dead-stick bite is also producing right now…At Lake Ray Roberts, site of the 51st Bassmaster Classic earlier this year, there is no current bass fishing report. But TPWD says that crappie are good on main lake brush piles in 20-30 feet of water on minnows. The agency says that the bigger fish are still in the Buck Creek area in the standing timber around 20-foot depths with the crappie bait suspended in the 10-12 feet of water…At Lake Fork, water is lightly stained; water temps are 62-64 degrees; and the lake is 3.17 feet low. Guides Jason Hoffman and Marc Mitchell tell TPWD that Fork’s largemouth bass are still biting good on spinnerbaits and Chatterbaits worked along windy banks in 3-4-feet of water. Viper XP jigs are good on wood near creeks and ditches in 4-6 feet of water. Suspending jerkbaits are also good near points and creeks with some flooded timber in 4-7-feet of water…Fork crappie guide Jacky Wiggins says that the slab bite is also good between the 154 and 515 bridges on creek channels. Fork’s crappie are feeding up on bait, so they are shad and happy, if you will, says the guide. He says to fish deep in 45-55-feet of water, but keeping in mind that crappie are suspended around 20-30-feet on top of the timber. Success is coming for crappie anglers using small one-sixteenth ounce hand ties with a weight above it, but if they are biting, also add a minnow… At the Blue River near Tishomingo, Okla., ODWC reports a normal river elevation, water temp of 52 degrees, and clear water. The agency says that this past week, rainbow trout have been good on in-line Mepp’s style spinnerbaits, PowerBait, and small spoons fished along channel braids and rocks in the Johnson County stream…If your Christmas holiday travel plans take you near the Texas Gulf Coast, on the Upper Coast at the Bolivar Peninsula, TPWD is still getting many reports of bull redfish, redfish, and jackfish being caught on live finger mullet, fresh cut bait, or squid…On the Middle Coast at Port Aransas, TPWD says that the big bull reds are in 30-feet of water at the jetties and the Fina Docks, biting on cut and live perch and cut mullet. Sheepshead are good on live shrimp too according to Capt. Doug Stanford of Pirates of the Bay Fishing Charters…Finally, down on the Lower Coast at South Padre Island, Capt. Lou Austin tells TPWD that if you put in the work, you will bring home a full sack of fish that will rival Santa’s sack of toys. Trout are biting well on artificial lures tossed in murky water on the east side, and for those anglers using live shrimp on a popping cork around the gas well. Lots of sheepshead are being caught by those free shrimping dead shrimp around the Causeway. Schools of sand trout south of Coast Guard station are good too, but redfish are spotty, with some oversized fish being caught in the jetties. In the main channel, slot sized reds are coming to anglers using cut finger mullet near Channel Marker 68 near Three Islands…

Tip of the Week

With family, friends, and guests coming over for the Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays, watching outdoor programming on your TV screen is a great way to pass the time. After all, if you can’t be outside fishing and hunting, watching some great outdoors programming is the next best thing, right? Thanks to Outdoor Sportsman Group’s MyOutdoorTV (MOTV) streaming platform, such programming is always available on demand with more than 20,0000+ hours available for viewing on your favorite devices like Xbox, iOS, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Roku, and LG and Samsung TVs. To give the gift of year-round outdoor programming, why not consider a gift card to MyOutdoorTV (MOTV) for a six month pre-paid plan ($49.50) or a 12-month plan ($98.99). For more information, visit www.myoutdoortv.com.



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Plan a trip outdoors! Travel Wisconsin Snow Report offers updated snow conditions


MADISON, Wis. (CBS 58) — Plan a trip to hit the slopes or enjoy a day out in some fresh powder! Travel Wisconsin’s Snow Report offers updated snow conditions at downhill ski and snowboard hills, cross-country ski areas and snowmobile trails statewide. 

According to a news release from Travel Wisconsin, the snow report uses local, first-hand information from reporters across Wisconsin to track trail and slope conditions throughout the season whether the snow falls naturally or is man-made. A dedicated network of chambers of commerce, visitor bureaus, ski resorts, snowmobile clubs and state and county park staff update the report in real time. With over 100 reporters in all 72 counties, travelers and residents can find the latest status of their favorite local trails and hills or discover something new.

“Winter is a truly magical time of year in Wisconsin. It’s a perfect time to make memories—a perfect run down a black diamond, a snowmobile ride on a pristine trail or even a sledding party with the family,” said Secretary-designee Anne Sayers. “The Wisconsin Snow Report is Wisconsin’s best tool to prepare for a winter adventure. It’s no wonder it’s consistently a top-visited resource on TravelWisconsin.com.”

The Wisconsin Snow Report can be found online HERE, as well as delivered right to your email inbox each Thursday throughout the season along with other ideas and resources for winter activities.





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