Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau offers tips for local getaways, giveaways – Press Telegram


Last year, the Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau offered a new service, providing themed itineraries for vacationers to experience the area “like the locals do.”

That program won awards — and is back for summer 2022. And with an addition. Now, when the itinerary of the month is unveiled, it will be accompanied by a chance to win prizes through the CVB’s Instagram account, @VisitLB.

This month’s trip is called Aquatic Adventure, highlighting all the ways to enjoy Long Beach’s 11 miles of waterway and coastline. The prize is aquatic-themed as well, with a family four pack of whale watching tickets from Harbor Breeze Cruises and four tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific. The day at the aquarium comes with an added perk: a family “Animal Encounter” with sharks and rays, or with some of the aquarium’s feathered friends.

A new specially curated itinerary will be released once a month for the next three months, according to Samantha Mehlinger, CVB’s vice president of communications.

“Our Long Beach Days & Getaways let you explore Long Beach like a local, showcasing unique attractions and activities alongside hidden gems that’ll make your friends say, ‘Where is that, and when can I go?’” she said in a release. “Be sure to follow us on Instagram for a chance to win prizes all summer long.”

Each itinerary will be revealed with an original video and giveaway on Instagram. To qualify for the prize drawing, go to @VisitLB on Instagram, spot the new video, tag two friends in the comments and follow @VisitLB.

For more ideas about things to do, go to visitlongbeach.com and visit the “This is Long Beach” blog on that website.

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Commissioner Nikki Fried Shares Tips for Avoiding Scams During Older Americans Month / 2022 Press Releases / Press Releases / News & Events / Home


Tallahassee, Fla. — With May marking Older Americans Month, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumers Services Nikki Fried is sharing tips to recognize and avoid consumer fraud scams, specifically those that target seniors.

“With $3 billion in annual losses from scammers among older Americans, it is critical to educate our seniors and caretakers of elderly loved ones on how to recognize the signs of fraudulent activity to protect against fraud,” said Commissioner Fried. “Together, we can help raise awareness of the warning signs to protect against becoming a victim of fraud and crack down on those criminals targeting seniors – not just during Older Americans Month but year-round.”

General Rules to Avoid Scams:

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recommend the following tips to help avoid fraud:

  • Resist pressure to take immediate action. Scammers will try to isolate you and will use scare tactics to create a sense of urgency. Don’t be rushed, and don’t believe anyone who says you don’t have time to talk to a friend or family member. Take the time to do your own research and talk with someone you trust.
  • Do not send money. If you are contacted by someone asking you to transfer money for them, it is most likely a scam. Wiring money is like sending cash. Once you send it, it’s gone. It is also never a good idea to deposit a check from someone you don’t know, especially if the stranger is asking you to wire money back to them.
  • Be wary of gift cards and cryptocurrency. Scammers utilize these forms of payment because they are hard to trace. Once the information from your gift card is obtained, it can be used by anyone. No legitimate business or government agency will insist that you pay with a gift card. For this same reason, anyone asking you to pay with cryptocurrency is likely a scammer. Cryptocurrency payments do not come with legal protections and once sent, are almost impossible to recover. 
  • Report fraud. If you are contacted by anyone using the previous listed methods to pay or send money, please report the incident to FDACS online or by calling 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-FL-AYUDA).  Additionally, please report to the FTC at ftc.gov.

Most Common Financial Scams Targeting Seniors

According to the National Council on Aging, seniors are more susceptible to the following scams:

Government Imposter Scams: An imposter scammer pretends to be someone you trust, oftentimes a government agency like the Social Security Administration, or the Internal Revenue Service. The scammer can have a fake name or number show up on your caller ID to convince you. Often, they will inform you your Social Security or Medicare benefits are in danger if you do not pay a fee or provide identifying information.

  • Do not trust the phone number: Often scammers will spoof the phone number from a relevant agency.
  • How to proceed. If you or a family member divulged personal identifying information or initiated a payment, follow these steps to protect yourself from further harm.

Grandparent or Emergency Scams: Emergency scams usually target parents, grandparents, or other family members. In these instances, someone calls or sends a message claiming to be a child or grandchild in trouble or the friend of a family member who is in trouble and urges the targeted victim to wire money immediately to help with an emergency.

  • Validate before you send money. Confirm the person’s identity before taking any steps to help. Ask the person questions that only your loved ones would know and be able to answer.
  • Verify with others. Before you send any money, verify the story with someone else in your family or circle of friends.

Computer Tech Support Scams: Tech support scams rely on convincing you of a serious problem with your computer. In doing so, the scammers will sell you services to “repair” your computer or will request remote access allowing them to find personal information on your device. 

  • Consider who is calling. If you receive an unexpected phone call about your computer, hang up. Legitimate tech companies will not contact you by phone about a computer problem.
  • Do not call. If you see a pop-up window on your computer screen about potential threats, do not call the number. Real security warnings will never ask you to call a phone number.

Sweepstakes and Lottery Scams: There are many legitimate sweepstakes offered in Florida. Prizes in legitimate contests are awarded solely by chance, and contestants don’t have to pay a fee or buy something to enter or increase their odds of winning. In fraudulent schemes, “winners” almost always have to pay to enter a contest or collect their “prize.”

  • Verify the sweepstakes. Any sweepstakes offering prizes totaling more than $5,000 must file with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. This also applies to sweepstakes based in other states if they are conducted in Florida. Call 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-FL-AYUDA) to verify.  
  • Never pay money to receive money. No purchase or entry fee is required in legitimate sweepstakes. Legitimate sweepstakes also don’t require you to pay shipping or handling fees, insurance, or taxes to collect your prize.
  • Don’t be deceived by official looking mail. It is unlawful for a promoter to lie about an affiliation with or endorsement by a government agency or any other well-known organization.

Romance Scams. A romance scam occurs when a criminal creates a fake online identity and uses it to gain the affection and trust of a victim. In romance scams, also called confidence scams, the criminal deceives a victim into believing they have a trusted relationship and then uses the relationship to persuade the victim to give money, personal and financial information, or items of value to the scammer.

  • Consider what you post. Scammers can use details shared on social media and dating sites to better understand and target you.
  • Research the person. Look at photos and profiles using online searches to see if the image, name, or details have been used elsewhere.
  • Look for suspicious behavior. Actions such as promising to meet in person, yet always having an excuse why he or she can’t, or trying to isolate you from family and friends can be signs that you are communicating with a scammer.

What should consumers do?

  • File a consumer complaint: To file a complaint, complete FDACS’ online form or call 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) or 1-800-FL-AYUDA (352-9832) en Español.
  • Share your story: Share your story with friends and family or on social media to help others avoid falling victim to similar scams.
  • Review our consumer resources: Consumers can find helpful tips and recourse on our website: FloridaConsumerHelp.com.

Background: FDACS Division of Consumer Services is Florida’s state consumer protection agency, responsible for regulating charities, handling consumer complaints, and protecting against unfair and unsafe business practices. The Division regulates businesses including motor vehicle repair shops, pawnbrokers, health studios, travel sellers, intrastate movers, professional surveyors and mappers, sweepstakes/game promotions, and telemarketers.

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Press Release- March 31,2022: New York State Division of Consumer Protection Provides Consumers Tips for Smart Travel Planning


Press Release 

March 31, 2022

New Yorkers Should Know Their Rights and Follow Basic Tips for the Best Deals and to Avoid Travel Scams

The New York State Division of Consumer Protection (DCP) reminds New Yorkers of their rights as they plan spring and summer travel. Travel disputes remain one of the top complaints handled by DCP. In 2021, DCP fielded hundreds of complaints from consumers who had to cancel or reschedule their travel plans due to COVID-19. As restrictions due to COVID-19 lift and more New Yorkers are traveling again, consumers should be informed of their rights, shop smartly to safeguard their hard-earned money and stay vigilant to protect themselves from scams.

“The COVID-19 pandemic caused major disruptions to travel, but also taught consumers valuable lessons about traveling responsibly,” said Secretary of State Robert Rodriguez, who oversees the Division of Consumer Protection. “By following these tips, New Yorkers will be better prepared to navigate the marketplace and spend responsibly as they plan their long-awaited travel this spring and summer.”

“As New Yorkers resume travelling, they are strongly encouraged to read any travel insurance policies and related documents carefully if they are considering the purchase of travel insurance to fully understand what is covered in the event that travel plans go awry,” said Superintendent of Financial Services Adrienne A. Harris.

SHOPPING SMART FOR TRAVEL

There are basic travel tips that consumers should be aware of when they are booking travel:

  • Do your research. Consumers should always weigh in the factors of a trip before purchase, including price, location, availability of activities and cancellation policies. Also consider whether the location has any Covid-19 restrictions in place, such as testing or vaccination status, prior to booking the trip.
  • Get all confirmations in writing. To safeguard against scams via changes in agreements, consumers should always get confirmation of plans in writing, whether booking online, over the phone, or in person. Retailers are required to disclose terms and conditions to consumers—always receive a copy of the agreement and save it for reference.
  • Beware of “all inclusive” or too good to be true offers. All-inclusive offers sound great but can have hidden charges and fees in their terms and conditions. Consumers may not even be aware of such fees until check-out, when their bill is higher than advertised. Sometimes these offers come with an agreement to join a membership or participate in a presentation. Always inquire about mandatory fees that may not appear in the advertised price, such as resort fees and taxes. Read the fine print when taking advantage of an “all-inclusive” offer.
  • Try to pay with a credit card, if you can. Credit cards often offer more protection than paying by cash, check or debit card. Some credit card companies also offer perks like trip insurance or concierge service while traveling and may offer additional protections if the trip is cancelled. Check with your credit card company on the conditions of travel expenditure reimbursement.
  • Review your travel agreements. Did you know you have an opportunity to cancel a travel agreement? The New York State Truth in Travel Act safeguards consumers against fraud, false advertising, misrepresentation, and other abuses. Travel agents and promoters must provide consumers with written disclosures of all the terms of the travel service within five days of purchase or agreement. Consumers should review the terms of the agreements fully upon receipt and ensure they align with what the consumer purchased. Consumers have until midnight of the third business day after receiving the agreement to cancel. Consumers can also cancel any time during the five-day period prior to receiving the disclosures.
  • Use reputable travel agents/tour companies. Consumers should research thoroughly before choosing an agent or company to work with. Keep track of arrangements and contracts, and review terms and conditions, especially the cancellation and refund policies. Reservations often require a deposit that may not be refundable. If the trip is cancelled, the deposit might only be applied toward future travel or may be forfeited altogether. Consumers should be sure they understand the policy prior to putting down a deposit.
  • Consider trip insurance and whether you need a ‘Cancel for Any Reason’ policy. Travel insurance can offer consumers relief in case of emergency before or during their trip, as coverage ranges from incidents of lost baggage to missed connections to potential medical emergencies. However, most standard travel insurance policies do not cover trip interruption or cancellation due to COVID-19 because such standard policies usually exclude coverage for an epidemic, pandemic, or similar public health event. Some trip insurance plans offer ‘Cancel for Any Reason’ coverage at an additional cost, which is often substantially higher than standard travel insurance and normally only allows up to 75 percent refund of traveler expenses if the trip is cancelled. Prior to purchasing a plan, review the terms of the policy and ask your insurer about coverage that may be excluded.

TRIP CANCELLATION

When all or part of a trip is cancelled, the cancellation policy and a consumer’s right to a refund will vary based on laws that regulate the company’s industry, who initiates the cancellation, when the cancellation is made, and the company’s own policy.

  • Airlines. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, airlines may offer refunds, including the ticket price and any optional fees charged, for cancelled or significantly delayed flights, even when flight disruptions are outside their control. If an airline isn’t doing that, consumers can report it to the U.S. Department of Transportation. If consumers cancel a reservation for any reason, consumers will be subject to the refund policy agreed to at the time of purchase, which may be no refund at all.
  • Cruise Lines. Refund options may vary by cruise line. The cruise ticket contract lays out the company’s cancellation policies and your rights. For example, you may be offered a refund, credit, or voucher for a future cruise. If you opt for a credit or voucher, make sure the expiration date is far enough out that you can use it. Read more from the Federal Maritime Commission about consumer rights and the recourse that might be available to you.
  • Lodging. Cancellation policies for hotels, motels, and online accommodation marketplaces can vary greatly, even within the same company based on the season, room type, or length of stay. Some may offer a choice between a refundable or nonrefundable rate while making the reservation. Be sure you fully understand the cancellation policy prior to making a reservation.

If a consumer is having trouble getting a refund owed for all or part of a cancelled trip, they are encouraged to file a complaint with DCP.

SIGNS OF A TRAVEL SCAM

The Federal Trade Commission warns against common travel scams. Some signs of a scam when booking travel include the following:

  • You have “won” a free vacation. Scammers will sometimes entice consumers with a free trip, but then disclose fees or deposits to get access. A prize should not include spending money and is likely a scam.
  • The details of your trip are vague. Consumers may be offered a stay in a five-star hotel or on a luxury cruise line, but then few details about the trip are presented. Always confirm and review the name of the company and location of the trip details.
  • You have limited time to accept the offer. Scammers often pressure consumers to make quick decisions about a deal, making it likely that the consumer will not have time to investigate the offer. Never feel pressured to agree to any terms you have not reviewed on your own.
  • You must pay in an uncommon way. Cryptocurrency, wire transfer, and gift cards are difficult to trace and perfect for scammers looking to take advantage of consumers, who will not be able to recoup their losses if they pay this way. If a travel company insists that you pay in one of these ways, decline the offer and report the company.

The New York State Division of Consumer Protection provides voluntary mediation between a consumer and a business when a consumer has been unsuccessful at reaching a resolution on their own. The Consumer Assistance Helpline 1-800-697-1220 is available Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm, excluding State Holidays, and consumer complaints can be filed at any time at www.dos.ny.gov/consumerprotection

Travel insurance is regulated by the Department of Financial Services. Consumer with complaints about travel insurance policy or ‘Cancel for Any Reason’ coverage issued in New York or by New York companies should contact DFS at www.dfs.ny.gov/complaint or through the DFS Consumer Hotline at (800) 342-3736 (212) 480-6400 or (518) 474-6600 (Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM).

For more consumer protection tips, follow the Division on social media at Twitter: @NYSConsumer and Facebook: www.facebook.com/nysconsumer.

 

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No travel advised in west central Minnesota – Alexandria Echo Press


ALEXANDRIA — The Minnesota Department of Transportation has enacted a no travel advisory on state and federal highways in Douglas, Becker, Clay, Grant, Mahnomen, Otter Tail and Wilkin counties due to dangerous driving conditions. This includes Interstate 94 from Moorhead to Osakis, and Highway 10 from Moorhead to Wadena.

Blowing snow is causing whiteout conditions. Snowplows will continue to operate, but motorists are advised not to travel until conditions improve.

For tips on safe winter driving, go to www.mndot.gov/workzone/winter.html.

For real-time traffic and travel information in Minnesota, visit www.511mn.org or get the free smartphone app at Google Play or the App Store.





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Opinion: Press pause on your international travel plans — for now


For many, this relative calm, occurring just as the holiday season approaches, means only one thing: an opportunity to leave the United States, to go overseas to that favorite tourist destination — somewhere in Europe where there aren’t so many tourists.

Unfortunately for travelers, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has implored Americans to think long and hard before they leap. Europe, it seems, is in the early stages of a new Covid-19 surge. The list of places labeled by the CDC as “avoid travel” due to risk of infection, updated weekly, includes about half the countries in Europe, with Belgium, Slovakia and Russia added just this week.
Note that “Europe,” from a public health perspective, is not the European Union or a travel agency conceit but rather the 53 countries on the World Health Organization’s map. This large area includes Russia and numbers about 750 million people, giving it nearly twice the population of the US.

Which brings us to the two questions for potential holiday travelers: Is it really this bad or is the CDC just being cautious? And is it going to get worse over there and, gulp, over here, too?

As to the first question — the CDC is not being too cautious. Not at all. The newest Eurosurge is quite real in countries as different culturally and politically as Russia and Germany, the Czech Republic and the Netherlands. Cases overall have been increasing for at least four weeks and are highest in those under 50 years of age, though older people are beginning to see an increase as well.
Travel to the Netherlands during Covid-19: What you need to know before you go
The reasons for the newest increase resemble those of the last big European surge from Marchunder-vaccination, weak enforcement of public health interventions and general refusal to accept the risk as real.
This lack of a clear and singular explanation for this uptick in cases has led to considerable speculation and handwringing. Countries in Eastern and Central Europe, many of them once part of the Iron Curtain, such as Bulgaria, Romania and Slovakia, have some of the lowest vaccination rates in the world, likely explaining the rise.
But in Western Europe, countries including Germany and Belgium have vaccination rates similar to the US — yet this does not seem sufficient to contain spread. To try to gain control once again, these countries are giving booster shots, trying even harder to convince the unvaccinated to take the shot and even considering re-instituting some components of the never popular lockdown. To my mind, a plausible explanation is that the same Delta variant is spreading to unvaccinated and unboosted people as weather cools and everyone returns indoors, where social distancing and fresh air are in short supply.
No matter the causes, the trends in Europe (and the Caribbean and some other areas around the world) are not amenable to a quick fix. The surge is here to stay, at least for a little while. In other words, Europe is likely to get worse rather than better in the weeks ahead.
As to the other question of whether the Eurosurge will presage a new global surge … well, it’s complicated. In the US, cases are rising in a few states, as has been true for months. But a more disturbing trend is being seen across large swaths of the country and in New York City as well: an end to the steady decrease of cases registered over the last few months. To turn a once good-news term to the dark side, the curve is flattening — but this time it indicates a stalemate between the virus and humanity, not the inspiring consequences of a hard-fought battle to curb a runaway pandemic.

Given all this uncertainty, international travel in the next weeks seems like a singularly bad idea. Yes, maybe this is all just a cold weather pause, or perhaps some more people need a boost, or maybe the virus is doing something new we have not yet discerned. But from what we know right now, there is a real possibility that whatever is driving the Western European increase will also mess things up in the US.

Once again, just when we think we have this pandemic figured out and are on the right track to extinction, something new gets thrown in our path. Decisions, though, still must be made — and the only thing we have learned, it seems, from almost two years of the pandemic is this: If the experts are confused about what’s going on, the best thing for everyone to do is to stay put.



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Jen Psaki, White House press secretary to Joe Biden, tests positive for Covid | Biden administration


Jen Psaki, Joe Biden’s White House press secretary, said on Sunday she had tested positive for Covid-19.

Psaki, 42, did not travel with Biden to Rome for this week’s G20 summit. The president is also due to travel to Glasgow for the Cop26 climate talks. Biden has been accompanied in Europe by his principal deputy press secretary, Karine Jean-Pierre.

News of a positive test for such a close aide to the president came a little over a year after an outbreak at the White House reached the then president, Donald Trump, who fell seriously ill and was forced to spend time in hospital.

In a statement, Psaki said she last saw the 78-year-old Biden on Tuesday, “when we sat outside more than 6ft apart and wore masks”.

Biden tested negative for Covid-19 on Saturday, Reuters quoted “a person familiar with the matter” as saying.

Psaki said she stayed in the US “due to a family emergency, which was members of my household testing positive for Covid-19”. She has two children.

“Since then,” Psaki continued, “I have quarantined and tested negative via PCR for Covid on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. However, today I tested positive for Covid.

“While I have not had close contact in person with the president or senior members of the White House staff since Wednesday and tested negative for four days after that last contact, I am disclosing today’s positive test out of an abundance of transparency.”

Psaki also said that “thanks to the vaccine I have only experienced mild symptoms, which has enabled me to continue working from home.

“I will plan to return to work in person at the conclusion of the 10-day quarantine following a negative rapid test, which is an additional White House requirement beyond [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] guidance, taken out an abundance of caution.”

White House staff and others traveling with the president began undergoing daily tests for Covid-19 before departing Washington and are all fully vaccinated. Many officials have also received booster shots, due to the close-quarters environment and frequent travel associated with their work.

Biden got his Covid-19 booster on 27 September, shortly after federal regulators approved the third dose for many Americans.

On Sunday Eric Feigl-Ding, an epidemiologist and senior fellow at the Federation of American Scientists, responded to the news that Psaki had worn a mask around Biden by tweeting: “Good to still mask up, even if vaxxed.”

According to Johns Hopkins University, the US has recorded nearly 46m cases of Covid-19 and more than 745,000 deaths. Resistance to vaccination mandates remains a concern, particularly among Republican voters, though case numbers are slowing.

On Sunday, the CDC said the US had administered 422,070,099 doses of Covid-19 vaccines, up from 420,657,683 doses on Saturday. The agency said 221,520,153 people had received at least one dose, while 192,453,500 people were fully vaccinated.

The CDC tally includes two-dose vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot vaccine. About 18.6 million people have received a booster dose.

Full approval for children aged five to 12 to receive the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is expected as soon as this week.





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Headlines – Police Press Release – October 29, 2021


Route 32 Traffic Enforcement Effort

Members of the Anne Arundel County Police Department’s Traffic Safety Section along with several officers from the four Police Districts conducted a high-intensity traffic enforcement detail on Route 32 on October 28, 2021, in the morning hours.

Utilizing marked and unmarked cars in the three and a half hour detail, officers made 56 traffic stops and issued 19 citations and 41 warnings for various offenses ranging from cell phone usage, speeding, seatbelts, and move-over law violations. This enforcement effort also included federally certified commercial vehicle inspectors who performed 13 commercial vehicle inspections. Three of the inspected commercial vehicles were placed out of service for safety violations. This enforcement is a continuation of directed enforcement patrols conducted on various county roadways as a result of crashes, aggressive driving, and speed complaints.

Additional enforcement efforts will be conducted on various county roadways focused on deterring aggressive driving, distracted driving, speeding, and occupant protection. Citizens observing any vehicles operated in a careless or reckless manner are asked to contact the police department by calling 911 or the non-emergency number- 410 222-8610. 

 

Northern District

Robbery/Cutting – Linthicum

21-736548

On October 29, 2021, at approximately 11:00 a.m., officers responded to Motel 6 located at 5179 Raynor Avenue in Linthicum for a report of a robbery. An adult male victim and two adult female victims were in their hotel room when an unknown male suspect armed with a handgun and a knife, forced his way into the room and demanded money. The male victim fought off the suspect and sustained a cut to an extremity from the suspect’s knife. The suspect fled without taking anything. The victim was treated for minor injuries. Northern District detectives are investigating and ask anyone with information to contact 410-222-6135. Individuals wishing to remain anonymous are encouraged to call the Anne Arundel County Police Tip Line at 410-222-4700. 

Suspect: Black male wearing a black and gold jacket and black hat

 

Southern District

Fatal Crash – Bristol

21-736584

On October 28, 2021, at approximately 2:00 p.m., officers responded to MD Route 4 northbound near Talbot Road for a reported single-vehicle crash. The investigation revealed that a red 2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo was traveling northbound on MD Route 4 near Talbot Road when the driver of the Chevrolet left the roadway and drove into a cluster of various sized trees. The vehicle overturned and came to rest on its roof amongst the trees. This caused serious injuries to the driver who was extricated by two witnesses to the crash: an off-duty nurse and a retired law enforcement officer. The driver of the Chevrolet was treated by Anne Arundel County Fire Department personnel but was ultimately pronounced deceased at the scene. 

The driver of the Chevrolet was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner’s Office (OCME) in Baltimore where an autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death. Preliminarily, the primary cause of this crash is the driver of the Chevrolet failing to stay in his lane of travel. At this time, it is unknown what caused the Chevrolet to leave the roadway. The Traffic Safety Section is investigating and anyone with any information is asked to call 410-222-4700.

Vehicle:  

2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo     

 

Driver:

Michael Magtutu (Fatal Injuries)

64-year-old

Chesapeake Beach, MD 

 

Eastern District

Serious Injury, Hit & Run Crash / Curtis Bay

21-736635

On October 28, 2021, at 6:50 p.m., officers responded to the intersection of Fort Smallwood Road and Hilltop Road for a crash involving a motorcycle and a car.

The investigation revealed that a 2019 Yamaha YFZR3 motorcycle was traveling northbound on Fort Smallwood Road approaching Hilltop Road on a steady green signal when a 2020 Nissan Altima traveling southbound on Fort Smallwood Road Avenue attempted to make a left turn onto Hilltop Road in front of the Yamaha. The rider of the Yamaha was unable to avoid striking the Nissan and was ejected from the motorcycle. The driver of the Nissan fled the scene in the vehicle. The vehicle was located unoccupied on Hilltop Road at Stoney Beach Way.

The rider of the motorcycle was transported to an area hospital with life-threatening injuries.

Preliminarily, the primary cause of this crash is the driver of the Nissan failing to yield the right-of-way to the Yamaha. The Altima was located a short distance away unoccupied and investigators are working to identify the driver.

The crash is currently under investigation by the Traffic Safety Section. Anyone with any information is asked to call 410-222-4700.

 

Vehicle 1: 

2020 Nissan Altima

Driver 1:

Unknown

 

Vehicle 2:

2019 Yamaha YFZR3 motorcycle

Driver 2:

21-year-old (Life-threatening injuries)

Pasadena, MD



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Headlines – Police Press Release – October 29, 2021


Route 32 Traffic Enforcement Effort

Members of the Anne Arundel County Police Department’s Traffic Safety Section along with several officers from the four Police Districts conducted a high-intensity traffic enforcement detail on Route 32 on October 28, 2021, in the morning hours.

Utilizing marked and unmarked cars in the three and a half hour detail, officers made 56 traffic stops and issued 19 citations and 41 warnings for various offenses ranging from cell phone usage, speeding, seatbelts, and move-over law violations. This enforcement effort also included federally certified commercial vehicle inspectors who performed 13 commercial vehicle inspections. Three of the inspected commercial vehicles were placed out of service for safety violations. This enforcement is a continuation of directed enforcement patrols conducted on various county roadways as a result of crashes, aggressive driving, and speed complaints.

Additional enforcement efforts will be conducted on various county roadways focused on deterring aggressive driving, distracted driving, speeding, and occupant protection. Citizens observing any vehicles operated in a careless or reckless manner are asked to contact the police department by calling 911 or the non-emergency number- 410 222-8610. 

 

Northern District

Robbery/Cutting – Linthicum

21-736548

On October 29, 2021, at approximately 11:00 a.m., officers responded to Motel 6 located at 5179 Raynor Avenue in Linthicum for a report of a robbery. An adult male victim and two adult female victims were in their hotel room when an unknown male suspect armed with a handgun and a knife, forced his way into the room and demanded money. The male victim fought off the suspect and sustained a cut to an extremity from the suspect’s knife. The suspect fled without taking anything. The victim was treated for minor injuries. Northern District detectives are investigating and ask anyone with information to contact 410-222-6135. Individuals wishing to remain anonymous are encouraged to call the Anne Arundel County Police Tip Line at 410-222-4700. 

Suspect: Black male wearing a black and gold jacket and black hat

 

Southern District

Fatal Crash – Bristol

21-736584

On October 28, 2021, at approximately 2:00 p.m., officers responded to MD Route 4 northbound near Talbot Road for a reported single-vehicle crash. The investigation revealed that a red 2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo was traveling northbound on MD Route 4 near Talbot Road when the driver of the Chevrolet left the roadway and drove into a cluster of various sized trees. The vehicle overturned and came to rest on its roof amongst the trees. This caused serious injuries to the driver who was extricated by two witnesses to the crash: an off-duty nurse and a retired law enforcement officer. The driver of the Chevrolet was treated by Anne Arundel County Fire Department personnel but was ultimately pronounced deceased at the scene. 

The driver of the Chevrolet was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner’s Office (OCME) in Baltimore where an autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death. Preliminarily, the primary cause of this crash is the driver of the Chevrolet failing to stay in his lane of travel. At this time, it is unknown what caused the Chevrolet to leave the roadway. The Traffic Safety Section is investigating and anyone with any information is asked to call 410-222-4700.

Vehicle:  

2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo     

 

Driver:

Michael Magtutu (Fatal Injuries)

64-year-old

Chesapeake Beach, MD 

 

Eastern District

Serious Injury, Hit & Run Crash / Curtis Bay

21-736635

On October 28, 2021, at 6:50 p.m., officers responded to the intersection of Fort Smallwood Road and Hilltop Road for a crash involving a motorcycle and a car.

The investigation revealed that a 2019 Yamaha YFZR3 motorcycle was traveling northbound on Fort Smallwood Road approaching Hilltop Road on a steady green signal when a 2020 Nissan Altima traveling southbound on Fort Smallwood Road Avenue attempted to make a left turn onto Hilltop Road in front of the Yamaha. The rider of the Yamaha was unable to avoid striking the Nissan and was ejected from the motorcycle. The driver of the Nissan fled the scene in the vehicle. The vehicle was located unoccupied on Hilltop Road at Stoney Beach Way.

The rider of the motorcycle was transported to an area hospital with life-threatening injuries.

Preliminarily, the primary cause of this crash is the driver of the Nissan failing to yield the right-of-way to the Yamaha. The Altima was located a short distance away unoccupied and investigators are working to identify the driver.

The crash is currently under investigation by the Traffic Safety Section. Anyone with any information is asked to call 410-222-4700.

 

Vehicle 1: 

2020 Nissan Altima

Driver 1:

Unknown

 

Vehicle 2:

2019 Yamaha YFZR3 motorcycle

Driver 2:

21-year-old (Life-threatening injuries)

Pasadena, MD



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