Judge Denies Capitol Riot Defendant Request to Travel to Jamaica




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Orange County Man Accused in January 6 Riot Appears in Court


ORLANDO, Fla. — A 30-year-old Orange County man accused of participating in the January attack on the U.S. Capitol as a member of the Proud Boys, wore a T-shirt promoting the group to federal court on Tuesday in Orlando.


What You Need To Know

  •  A 30-year-old Orange County man appeared in federal court Tuesday on charges he participated in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol
  •  Arthur Jackman could be seen wearing a shirt saying, “Proud Boys did nothing wrong!” during the hearing
  • He was released on a $25,000 bond

Arthur Jackman, 30, was released on a $25,000 unsecured bond and other conditions, including staying away from his wife’s guns.

He ignored reporters’ questions and remained silent after Tuesday’s hearing.

He had turned his black T-shirt turned inside out, hiding the lettering, for his brisk walk from the courthouse to an SUV that pulled over on West Central Boulevard to pick him up.

Earlier, when Jackman — shackled at his ankles and wrists — walked into the courtroom wearing the shirt, the words on the front, “Proud Boys did nothing wrong!” were visible.

The back was also visible during his 20-minute hearing before U.S. Magistrate Judge Daniel Irick at the George C. Young Federal Courthouse Annex.

It said: “I am a Western chauvinist, and I refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.”

The back also had an image of George Washington and a character giving an OK hand gesture — a suspected “white power” symbol.

In a criminal complaint filed by federal prosecutors in the District of Columbia, Jackman is accused of obstruction of an official proceeding, a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

He is also accused of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and engaging in disruptive and disorderly conduct. Someone convicted of that crime, which is a misdemeanor, could be imprisoned for up to a year.

Jackman will eventually have to travel to a federal court in D.C.

He also will have a pretrial hearing in Orlando, but a date wasn’t set Tuesday.

Federal prosecutors did not ask Irick to hold Jackman until his trial.

Instead, the judge imposed release conditions recommended by prosecutors, including taking his passport and restricting his travel to the Middle District of Florida and the District of Columbia.

He is allowed to travel between those destinations for court appearances.

Jackman is the latest in a string of Florida suspects tied to the Proud Boys accused of storming the U.S. Capitol on January 6 in an attempt to overturn the results of the presidential general election. Other Florida suspects include alleged attackers from another far-right group, The Oath Keepers.


In all, more than 300 people, many supporters of former President Donald Trump, have been charged in the siege.

The FBI got a tip about Jackman from an unidentified person described as a childhood friend.

Jackman texted a photo of himself inside the Capitol while wearing a mask and giving the OK hand gesture, agents allege.

Agents said in a document Jackman photographed and videotaped wearing a red plaid shirt in the U.S. Capitol.

The FBI interviewed him on January 19, when he reportedly told them he joined Proud Boys in 2016 to support Trump.

He thinks the election “was stolen,” according to a court document which states Jackman and “other Proud Boys were not there to infiltrate the Capitol as it was not a sanctioned Proud Boys event …”

Federal investigators obtained Google records of Jackman’s phone and say he entered the Capitol at around 2:14 p.m.

He was inside various locations, including the northern end of the Capitol and inside the Senate chamber, federal officials allege.

When agents asked if he was in the Capitol or if photos would show him there, Jackman had “no comment,” the agents said.

Agents said Jackman was spotted with Joseph Randall Biggs of Ormond Beach, another accused member of the Proud Boys, before and after the Capitol attack.

Biggs, Jackman and others were captured on video marching on Constitution Avenue while chanting “Whose streets? Our streets!” and expletives.

Biggs was later captured on video inside the Capitol, according to the affidavit.

“In the video, a voice off camera says, ‘Hey Biggs, what do you gotta say?’ The person depicted below smiles broadly and replies, ‘This is awesome!’ before pulling his gaiter up to cover his face,” a probable cause affidavit from the FBI said.

The video was live streamed on the Parler social-media site, the FBI said.

Biggs and other alleged members of the Proud Boys in the U.S. Capitol attack were equipped with “walkie-talkie style communication devices” on their chests, the FBI alleges.



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Californian brothers ‘involved in Capitol riot’ arrested after tip from Finland


Two California brothers were arrested for being part of the pro-Trump mob that ransacked the Capitol on 6 January after an anonymous tipster from Finland reported a video on the website of Finnish newspaper Ilta-Sanomat to the FBI.

In the video, 33-year-old Kevin Cordon can be seen speaking to Finnish correspondent Mikko Marttinen outside the Capitol with a bloody forehead, wearing a ballistics vest and draped in an American flag.

Mr Cordon can be seen saying in the video that “there were people scuffling with the cops, and that’s when I got hit with a projectile, not sure what it was. And then from there, we proceeded into the broken windows and into the Capitol building. We were walking around the hallways, and the Trump supporters were all going nuts”.

His older brother Sean Carlo Corden, 35, can be seen in the background of the video, which was sent to the FBI by a Finnish reader the day after the riot.

The two brothers were arrested Tuesday and charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and other crimes, The Los Angeles Times reported.

Mr Cordon told Ilta-Sanomat: “It’s clear that this election is stolen, there’s just so much overwhelming evidence, and the establishment, the media, big tech are just completely ignoring all of it, and we’re here to show them we’re not having it. We’re not just going to take this laying down.”

There’s nothing that indicates that what Mr Cordon said is true, in fact, The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency said in a statement on 12 November 2020: “The November 3rd election was the most secure in American history.”

FBI Agent Shane Anderson wrote in a criminal complaint unveiled Tuesday that weeks of research after the initial tip from Finland led to the arrest of the brothers after it became clear that the video matched the photos on their driver licenses.

Mr Anderson said that surveillance footage shows the brothers outside the Capitol building near a group of police officers and then shows them climbing through a window around ten minutes later.

Cameras inside the building provided footage of the brothers walking through the crypt underneath the Rotunda and then again outside the building as Mr Cordon can be seen speaking to the Finnish reporter. He was seen calling someone on his phone around 3 pm which was then matched with records showing a call to an individual who shares his California home.

Flight records and airport footage also shows the brothers flying into DC from California on 5 January and back home on 7 January.

Sean Carlo Cordon’s Twitter feed indicates that he looked up to Mr Trump and that he believed his lies about the election being stolen, the LA Times reported.

The brothers were arrested at their homes around 6 am and their residences were searched, FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said.

They were ordered released on $50,000 bonds during their first appearance in court in LA. Their locations will be surveilled as they wait for their trials and they were ordered to give up any guns.



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Gilroy woman charged for allegedly participating in riot at US Capitol


GILROY, Calif. (KION) The Federal Bureau of Investigations has been working to identify and charge the people suspected of being involved in the Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol, and they have charged a Gilroy woman.

In a criminal complaint, the FBI said investigators interviewed a person on Jan. 8 who provided a tip that Gilroy resident Mariposa Castro had participated in the riots. She is reportedly “well-known in the community for her counter-protest activities.”

The person who submitted a tip said they were part of a social media group that has discussed Castro’s activities and saw images and videos that she uploaded to social media. Based on the information, the FBI was able to find several social media accounts attributed to Mariposa Castro, also known as Imelda Castro.

The FBI shared screenshots of two social media posts in the criminal complaint that she appears to have made, suggesting that she was at the Capitol during the riots.

She also allegedly posted videos to Facebook, and the FBI said one of them showed her climbing through a window at the Capitol and saying, “I’m going in. I’m going in, I’m going in the Capitol. We’re in! We’re inside the Capitol house. We got inside the Capitol.” In others, she reportedly spoke about gasses being released inside the building.

The FBI described multiple videos posted to Castro’s Facebook page showing her in and around the Capitol in the criminal complaint.

When the FBI became aware of the videos, agents interviewed someone near Castro’s home in Gilroy. The person they interviewed told them Castro had shared plans to travel to Washington, DC, and they were able to confirm her travel plans with travel records. The FBI found that she had traveled to the city the day before the riot.

After verifying Castro’s identity and reviewing her yoga studio’s Instagram account, agents tried to contact her at her Gilroy home on Jan. 15, but they said she did not come to the door.

Castro is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Read the full criminal complaint below.



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Tips, videos lead to Capitol riot suspects in NY


ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — An upstate New York man who boasted in a Facebook video that he was in the “Capitol building smoking with all my people!” and a Long Island man who told a friend on Instagram “I’d storm the Capitol for you any day” were arrested Wednesday in connection with the insurrection earlier this month, federal authorities said.

James Bonet of Glens Falls and Christopher Ortiz of Huntington were charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority and disorderly conduct on U.S. Capitol grounds, according to court papers. Both cases will be tried in Washington, D.C.

Bonet turned himself into the FBI and Ortiz was arrested separately Wednesday morning, authorities said. At least 200 people have been charged in connection with the unrest in the nation’s capital, the capstone of former President Donald Trump’s baseless attempts to overturn the election results.

The FBI said it was tipped off to videos posted on social media that indicated both Bonet and Ortiz were in the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. They included videos on Bonet’s Facebook page showing him inside the Capitol and videos posted to Ortiz’s Instagram account showing his perspective while walking with a crowd through a Capitol hallway and yelling “Onward, Onward!” court papers said.

Ortiz was released into the custody of his father after an initial court appearance Wednesday evening. Bonet was released after a court appearance in Albany. Judges restricted both men’s travel to the areas of New York where they live and said they could only go to Washington for court hearings. Ortiz’s lawyer declined to comment. A message seeking comment was left with Bonet’s lawyer.

In one video titled “Made it in,” Bonet can be heard saying: “We’re taking it back! We are taking it back, we made it in the building!” according to court papers.

The Bonet tipster, a person who knew him through mutual friends, said some videos on his Facebook account were deleted, including one that showed him smoking what appeared to be marijuana inside the Capitol.

Bonet, who works as a shift manager for an undisclosed employer in Saratoga Springs, openly talked about government conspiracies at work and about false claims that last year’s presidential election was stolen, court papers said.

The FBI said it learned about Ortiz the day after the riot when one of his coworkers ratted him out using the the bureau’s online tip portal. The person, who’d known Ortiz for about five years and followed him on Instagram, pointed agents to his online videos.

Another tipster, a high school classmate of Ortiz’s, showed agents a video from Ortiz’s Instagram account of people scaling walls and large crowds reaching an entrance to the Capitol as a man believed to be Ortiz screamed “Yeah! We’re at the door!” court papers said.

That tipster messaged Ortiz on the app, admonishing him for being at the Capitol and asking him to explain what he was doing there, according to screenshots of the conversation included in court papers.

Ortiz responded that he was, “participating in government,” according to the papers.

When the tipster noted that the FBI was searching for people involved in the riot, the papers said, Ortiz wrote back: “Lol they can come and get me; I didn’t break or vandalize or steal; I walked through and out.”

In a subsequent message, Ortiz added: “I’d storm the Capitol for you any day.”



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Judge allows Texas florist charged in Capitol riot to travel to Mexico for retreat.


A florist from Texas who is facing charges for participating in the riot at the Capitol last month can travel to Mexico later this month, a federal judge ruled Friday. Jenny Louise Cudd had gone viral earlier this week when some news reports incorrectly stated she had been given permission to visit Riviera Maya, Mexico for a retreat. At the time though she had only filed a request to get permission for travel. On Friday, Judge Trevor N. McFadden of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted her request to attend the “work-related bonding retreat.”

In approving the request, McFadden said Cudd doesn’t have a criminal history and no one had suggested she was a flight risk nor that she could pose a danger to others. McFadden also pointed out that the prosecutors had not objected to Cudd’s request to travel. The judge did order Cudd to “provide her itinerary to her supervising Pretrial Services Officer and follow any other instructions provided by Pretrial Services.”

There is no question that Cudd, a flower shop owner who unsuccessfully ran for mayor of Midland, Texas in 2019, was inside the Capitol at the time of the riot. She streamed a live video of herself inside the Capitol in which she says she “charged the Capitol today with patriots.” In the video she said that “we did break down Nancy Pelosi’s office door” and seemed happy with herself for participating in the insurrection. “Hell, yes, I am proud of my actions,” she said in the video.

Cudd also talked about her involvement with local media outlets. “I personally didn’t break anything,” Cudd told the Odessa American shortly after the riot. “I didn’t break down any doors. I didn’t do anything violent. No one that I saw had any weapons of any sort.” In a television interview, Cudd didn’t express regret, saying she’d “do it again in a heartbeat.” In the interview with the Odessa American, Cudd said she wasn’t worried about consequences to her actions “because I know I didn’t break the law.” Prosecutors apparently disagree with Cudd. At first she was charged with two misdemeanors but they later brought additional charges. A grand jury has indicted Cudd on five counts.





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Attorney responds after Rogersville man charged in US Capitol riot


SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) – A Rogersville man facing federal charges in the US Capitol riot on Jan. 6 was released from the Greene County Jail on bond Friday after appearing before a federal judge in Springfield.

Zachary Martin is charged with being on restricted buildings or grounds, unlawful activities on Capitol grounds and disorderly conduct and demonstrating in the Capitol.

Officers arrested Zachary Martin in southeast Springfield on Thursday. The FBI got a tip saying Martin had entered the US Capitol on January 6th and live streamed the event on Facebook.

Martin’s attorney, Dee Wampler, says Martin did not go to Washington, D.C. with the intent of going into the capitol, but the group mentality convinced him to enter.

“People were saying, “Come on in’ and you should think twice before you do anything like that. But it was, I think, the group think sort of took over,” Wampler says. “He went in and now he’s paying for it.”

Federal charging documents say a witness gave the FBI screenshots that had been circulating on Facebook from Martin’s livestream.

Wampler tells KY3 that Martin deleted his Facebook page four days after the riot.

“Hundreds of people, thousands, would’ve had access to his being there,” Wampler says. “It didn’t occur to him that he was ever gonna get prosecuted.”

Another witness told the FBI they met Martin at a bar in Springfield during the week leading up to January 6. During the conversation, they say Martin told them that he was going to travel to Washington, D.C.

Wampler says Martin decided to go to Washington, D.C. after hearing from former President Trump.

“He only watched one speech by President Trump and he said, “That sounds good to me. I like what the man said,” Wampler says. “Then, when the president invited people to Washington D.C., he and three other people took him up on it.”

If Martin is found guilty, Wampler says he can face up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.

“Should he have gone in? No,” Wampler says. “It was a situation where at that time the public was not invited into that area where he went in.”

His case is moved to federal court in Washington D.C. since that’s where the riot took place. Wampler says Martin will have an arraignment next week over Zoom so they don’t have to travel.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2021 KY3. All rights reserved.



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Woman saying she wanted shoot Pelosi ‘in the friggin’ brain’ during Capitol riot arrested


Two women were arrested in connection to the U.S. Capitol riot where one of them posted a video on social media saying they were looking for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi “to shoot her in the friggin’ brain but we didn’t find her,” according to federal prosecutors.

Dawn Bancroft and Diana Santos-Smith were arrested in Pennsylvania Friday after federal authorities received a tip about the “selfie” video, which appeared to be filmed by Bancroft, according to the criminal complaint. The video depicted Bancroft wearing a red “Make America Great Again” ski-cap style hat and Santos-Smith with a “Make America Great Again” baseball hat in the process of attempting to exit the U.S. Capitol building alongside a mob of other supporters of former President Donald Trump on Jan. 6.

“We broke into the Capitol … we got inside, we did our part,” Bancroft said in the video, according to the complaint. “We were looking for Nancy to shoot her in the friggin’ brain but we didn’t find her.”

When interviewed by the FBI around Inauguration Day, Santos-Smith initially told authorities she attended Trump’s rally but did not enter the Capitol building. When agents showed her Bancroft’s “selfie” video, Santos-Smith admitted she lied. Santos-Smith said she entered the Capitol to protest but had not planned it in advanced, according to the criminal complaint.

While both Bancroft and Santos-Smith admitted they entered the Capitol building “for approximately 30 seconds to one minute,” they denied entering to any offices.

A video screenshot shows both Dawn Bancroft wearing a red “Make America Great Again” ski-cap style hat, and Diana Santos-Smith wearing a red “Make America Great Again” baseball hat during the U.S. Capitol riots on Jan. 6, according to the FBI.via FBI

Both women are facing charges, including knowingly entering and remaining in restricted buildings without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Bancroft and Santos-Smith are among at least 160 people who have been charged federally with crimes related to the riot that left five people dead. Among them are also QAnnon supporter Jacob Anthony Chansley — also known as Jake Angeli or “Q Shaman” — and Dominic Pezzola, a well-known member of the far-right nationalist group the Proud Boys.

Chansley, who was photographed at the Capitol carrying a 6-foot spear and wearing a horned fur costume during the riot, pleaded not guilty on Friday to charges that include knowingly entering a restricted building without lawful authority and for violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, court documents show. A day earlier his lawyer offered Chansley to testify at former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial next month.

Pezzola was one of the first to lead the charge both outside and inside the Capitol, effectively overwhelming police defenses after stealing an officer’s riot shield, according to a document filed by prosecutors who are seeking to have Pezzola held until trial.

“The defendant’s actions show planning, determination, and coordination. His stated desire to commit further acts of violence, combined with his access to weapons- and bomb-making manuals, is extremely concerning,” the court document says.

Prosecutors, citing social media posts and surveillance video, said Pezzola and another Proud Boy member helped thousands of people reach Capitol grounds after they moved a piece of the fence that left police unprotected. Pezzola allegedly then pulled out a riot shield and used it to break a building window.

“Moreover, although the defendant turned himself in on the arrest warrant, he did so only after going on the run, changing his appearance, and apparently turning off his cell phone,” the filing said about Pezzola’s actions following the riot.

The FBI has found evidence suggesting some rioters coordinated the assault on the Capitol, which includes Pezzola’s actions, while discussions of potential violence were also taking place online in portals such as TheDonald.win, Parler, and Telegram.

The additional arrests come as authorities are working on heightening security measures for U.S. lawmakers. On Thursday, Capitol Police asked members of Congress to report travel plans in order to increase protections for traveling lawmakers through the region’s major airports and Washington’s Union Station.

Pelosi, D-Calif., said that part of the threat is an “enemy” within the chamber, in reference to colleagues who “want to bring guns on the floor and have threatened violence on other members of Congress.”

Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., said Friday she requested to move her Capitol office away from Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., claiming she “berated” her in the hallway without a mask.





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Woman arrested in Pa. and charged in Capitol riot said she wanted to shoot Pelosi ‘in the friggin’ brain,’ FBI says


News of their arrest and alleged threats come amid heightened security for U.S. lawmakers. Capitol Police asked members of Congress to report travel plans, while the agency beefed up protection for traveling lawmakers in major airports in the region, as well as Washington’s Union Station, The Post reported Friday. Pelosi said on Thursday that part of the threat is an “enemy” within the chamber, referencing colleagues who “want to bring guns on the floor and have threatened violence on other members of Congress.”





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Tips, videos lead to Capitol riot suspects in New York


Albany, N.Y. — An upstate New York man who boasted in a Facebook video that he was in the “Capitol building smoking with all my people!” and a Long Island man who told a friend on Instagram “I’d storm the Capitol for you any day” were arrested Wednesday in connection with the insurrection earlier this month, federal authorities said.

James Bonet of Glens Falls and Christopher Ortiz of Huntington were charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority and disorderly conduct on U.S. Capitol grounds, according to court papers. Both cases will be tried in Washington, D.C.

Bonet turned himself into the FBI and Ortiz was arrested separately Wednesday morning, authorities said. At least 200 people have been charged in connection with the unrest in the nation’s capital, the capstone of former President Donald Trump’s baseless attempts to overturn the election results.

The FBI said it was tipped off to videos posted on social media that indicated both Bonet and Ortiz were in the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. They included videos on Bonet’s Facebook page showing him inside the Capitol and videos posted to Ortiz’s Instagram account showing his perspective while walking with a crowd through a Capitol hallway and yelling “Onward, Onward!” court papers said.

Ortiz was released into the custody of his father after an initial court appearance Wednesday evening. Bonet was released after a court appearance in Albany. Judges restricted both men’s travel to the areas of New York where they live and said they could only go to Washington for court hearings. Ortiz’s lawyer declined to comment. A message seeking comment was left with Bonet’s lawyer.

In one video titled “Made it in,” Bonet can be heard saying: “We’re taking it back! We are taking it back, we made it in the building!” according to court papers.

The Bonet tipster, a person who knew him through mutual friends, said some videos on his Facebook account were deleted, including one that showed him smoking what appeared to be marijuana inside the Capitol.

Bonet, who works as a shift manager for an undisclosed employer in Saratoga Springs, openly talked about government conspiracies at work and about false claims that last year’s presidential election was stolen, court papers said.

The FBI said it learned about Ortiz the day after the riot when one of his coworkers ratted him out using the the bureau’s online tip portal. The person, who’d known Ortiz for about five years and followed him on Instagram, pointed agents to his online videos.

Another tipster, a high school classmate of Ortiz’s, showed agents a video from Ortiz’s Instagram account of people scaling walls and large crowds reaching an entrance to the Capitol as a man believed to be Ortiz screamed “Yeah! We’re at the door!” court papers said.

That tipster messaged Ortiz on the app, admonishing him for being at the Capitol and asking him to explain what he was doing there, according to screenshots of the conversation included in court papers.

Ortiz responded that he was, “participating in government,” according to the papers.

When the tipster noted that the FBI was searching for people involved in the riot, the papers said, Ortiz wrote back: “Lol they can come and get me; I didn’t break or vandalize or steal; I walked through and out.”

In a subsequent message, Ortiz added: “I’d storm the Capitol for you any day.”



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