Gonzaga has away games at San Diego and Pepperdine rescheduled


Gonzaga's game against San Francisco on Jan. 20 was originally scheduled for Jan. 6

Gonzaga’s game against San Francisco on Jan. 20 was originally scheduled for Jan. 6

Gonzaga men’s basketball’s (15-2, 4-0) two away games at the University of San Diego and at Pepperdine have been rescheduled by the West Coast Coast. GU will now travel to San Diego to face the Toreros Feb. 3, and head back to California to take on the Waves Feb. 17.

The Zags were set to take on the Toreros (10-8, 3-2) on Dec. 30 last year to kick off conference play. The Toreros were dealing with health and safety protocols at the time and had to postpone their first WCC games.



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That’s a wrap as Super Burrito owner retires in San Bernardino – San Bernardino Sun


Art Santoya prided himself on his personal service behind the order window of San Bernardino favorite Super Burrito. He remembered regular customers’ names and orders. He was delighted when the loyalty extended to a family’s second or third generation.

But when Santoya retired Dec. 31, he kept it quiet. Only a handful knew. His last day passed the way he wanted it, without fuss, without fanfare.

We spoke in person Dec. 27 at his Waterman Avenue restaurant, a fixture since 1978. I’d planned to get this into print before his last day, but he asked me to hold off until he was gone. The prospect of being besieged by regulars was emotionally overwhelming.

“I really haven’t told anyone I’m retiring,” Santoya said. “It’s hard for me to say goodbye.” And, because he’s selling to his cook, and the food won’t change, “I don’t want people to think it’s going to be different.”

The new owners are Fred Anguiono, a Super Burrito mainstay for more than 30 years, and Anguiono’s wife and stepson. They’ve had experience with Tres Jalapenos in Highland and Zorro in Redlands.

“It’s in good hands,” said Suzanne Santoya, Art’s wife.

What if people ask, “Where’s Art?” Daughter Arlene volunteered a cover story: “On a break.”

Dan Watkins, a customer at Super Burrito for more than 40 years, places an order with Arlene Santoya for a jumbo burrito with pork and ground beef. (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

I’ve eaten at only four restaurants in San Bernardino, and — what are the odds? — Super Burrito is one of them. It’s a walk-up stand with a small patio and picnic tables and steady business at the order window.

I was tipped off to Art’s impending retirement by Olivia Tierney, a first cousin of Suzanne’s. Because Dec. 27 was cold and rainy, Art, Suzanne and I spoke inside in a corner of the kitchen, standing up.

At age 63, Art felt like it was time to give up the stress of working 12 hours a day, six days a week and to enjoy life with his wife, four kids and seven grandchildren.

“His mind is always on the business,” Suzanne said.

Once, she said, she awakened in the night and Art, sleepwalking, was standing in front of their bedroom closet, its door open, asking the racks of clothes, “Do you want cheese and salsa on your burrito?”

I burst out laughing.

“My mind’s not always on the business,” Art demurred.

“Even while you were sleeping!” Suzanne exclaimed.

The business, started by his parents, is so intertwined with his life, it always felt more like his home than the house he grew up in.

“It was my mother’s adventure,” Art said of Carmen, a hairdresser who loved cooking and whose dream was to own a restaurant. His father, Raymond, worked at Norton Air Force Base.

When she was looking at restaurants for lease, young Art came along. She asked which one was the best. He picked the burger stand at 449 N. Waterman Ave.

“We were living in Colton at the time. So I said this was the best because it was closest,” Art recalled.

The family started the newly named King Size Burger in 1968. Carmen was there seven days a week, cooking, taking orders, buying supplies, mopping the floor, whatever needed to be done.

When his mother wanted to retire in 1978, Art leaped at the chance. He had briefly worked for the Colton parks and recreation department and didn’t care for it. But he’d always liked his time at the restaurant as a teenager.

Because customers were asking for more Mexican food, he de-emphasized burgers (although they’re still on the menu), shifted to burritos and tacos, and changed the name from King Size Burgers to Super Burrito.

“We did everything super-sized. We gave bigger portions and everyone loved it,” Art said.

A red pork burrito on the patio of San Bernardino’s Super Burrito. (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

First came the jumbo burrito, then the other signatures: the Dino Burrito (named for San Bernardino), the I.E. Burrito and The Bomb.

“I had the radio on,” Art said of his inspiration, “and they were playing the song ‘You Dropped a Bomb on Me.’ I thought, ‘That would be a good name for a burrito. I’ll put everything in it’” — pork, beef, steak, beans, rice and sour cream. The Bomb weighs about two pounds and is served wet.

The junior burrito is the size of a normal burrito anywhere else. It’s just right.

The clientele ranges from judges, lawyers, cops and county employees to people who can barely afford a meal. Art used to extend credit to people out of compassion and was surprised how many came back at the end of the week to settle up.

He’d give the destitute a task like picking up around the parking lot in exchange for a hot meal, or treat someone just out of jail before they got on a bus.

Suzanne said, quoting her husband: “It’s not going to break me to give them a bean burrito.”

Art said Super Burrito always gives the customer a little extra, without skimping, because his mother’s philosophy was that “it doesn’t cost you a lot and they’ll appreciate it.”

Friendliness is equally important. “If you’re friendly, and you make a mistake, they’ll give you a second chance,” Art said. “If you’re rude, they won’t, even if the food is good.”

Super Burrito has weathered a lot, including the closing of Norton and the onslaught of COVID. Because it’s a takeout place, business is up during the pandemic.

People all over the area know Art. He’s been recognized in Las Vegas and at the LA County Fair. When he got his first COVID shot at Loma Linda, one of the nurses saw him and exclaimed, “Super Burrito!”

“He doesn’t think so,” Suzanne said, “but I think he’s pretty popular.”

His local fame helped during one tricky situation in San Bernardino in the 1990s. His white truck was mistaken in the Smart & Final parking lot for a stolen vehicle. Police ordered Art out of his truck at gunpoint.



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Willie Brown on Crime and Street Conditions in San Francisco


San Francisco is starting the new year at a gloomy time: fearful of the latest wave of coronavirus infections, seemingly helpless in the face of an overdose crisis that kills two people a day, and divided over how to respond to crime and homelessness.

This stark picture was reinforced by the blunt words of Mayor London Breed, who in the days before Christmas roiled the city’s politics with a cutting assessment of the streets that she presides over and a vow to aggressively clean them up: “It is time that the reign of criminals who are destroying our city — it is time for it to come to an end,” she told reporters at City Hall, vowing to be more aggressive with law enforcement and policy.

For perspective on this difficult time for San Francisco, I sat down with Willie Brown, the mayor from 1996 to 2004 and a longtime Democratic Party power broker. We discussed the state of emergency that Breed announced before Christmas and San Francisco’s outsize role in state and national politics.

That role is one reason the city so often comes under the microscope. Brown pointed out that if something were to happen to President Biden, the two next in line for the presidency are San Franciscans: Vice President Kamala Harris and the speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi.

But he had harsh words for the next generation of San Francisco’s leaders and a less-than-uplifting view of the challenges the city is facing. Here are edited excerpts from our conversation.

Where do you come down on the question of whether San Francisco is suffering from a crisis of street conditions and crime and whether, as Mayor Breed says, it has become a lot worse?

San Francisco is plagued with idealism. We really do want to care for everybody that can’t care for themselves. Whether they are addicted, whether they are emotionally challenged by any means or whether they are financially challenged. We’ve always wanted to make San Francisco a place where you could be comfortable. But that’s created a problem. Because suddenly the people enjoying the comfort are the people who have decided they can define how they can enjoy the comfort. And that might be an intrusion on the people who are paying for it — the taxpayers.

How do you rate the street conditions today in San Francisco compared with when you were mayor?

The drugs today are dramatically different from the drugs of my time. You did not have nonprofit organizations giving tents to homeless people. And you didn’t have the same volume of homeless people. So you could use the sidewalks, whether you were in the Tenderloin or in Pacific Heights.

Mayor Breed was blunt in describing the city. She spoke about “mass looting” and of the city’s “nasty streets” strewn with trash, urine and feces. Do you agree with her assessment?

Totally and completely accurate. And descriptive. And believable. She wasn’t trying to be political. I think she was describing what she saw. Very bold. It’s grandmotherish.

Will the state of emergency in the Tenderloin work?

Only if she can get the rest of the city to buy in. The city unfortunately is not run by the mayor. We are now plagued with the politics of districts that have no interest in anything except their little turf.

You have often spoken about how much lies beyond a city’s control.

If you go back to 1997, I scheduled a homeless summit. I canceled it just before I was to do it because I concluded that there was no possible way for any one single city or county to solve the homeless problem. I am still of that opinion. They can address it, they can impact it, but they can’t solve it. It is too rooted in poverty and mental health.

San Francisco has played an outsize role in California politics. The state’s leaders have come from San Francisco in disproportionate numbers. Do you see San Francisco keeping this role?

No, I do not. We have no bench. We have not attempted to build a roster of new, talented people.

Do I hear you saying that San Francisco is no longer at the vanguard of liberal ideas for the country?

No, we still have all kinds of people with ideas. But we have nobody on the bench capable of implementing them.

What do you see in this new year for the city of San Francisco that gives you hope?

The action that the mayor took would be one example of what would cause me to alter my view about whether or not there is hope. I’m a total optimist for California, not just San Francisco. There is a tremendous amount of real talent in California.


It’s hard to think of a journalist today who writes with more authority about the Central Valley than Mark Arax. His latest article on water use has both historical sweep and personal history. You can feel the sandy loam passing through your fingers.


California cabernet beyond the stereotypes.


Today’s travel tip comes from Robyn Houts, who recommends Chitactac-Adams Heritage County Park in Gilroy:

“It has a creekside trail with interpretive signs, picnic area, amenities, and an interpretive shelter. Uvas Creek winds through this unique section of sandstone, with one striking bluff know to locals simply as ‘The Rock.’ It was home to native people, and many bedrock mortars attest to their presence. Chitactac is a favorite stop for cyclists enjoying the back roads and Bay Area folk on their way to the coast. Stop in for a visit!”

Tell us about your favorite places to visit in California. Email your suggestions to [email protected]. We’ll be sharing more in upcoming editions of the newsletter.


How did you mark the start of the 2022? Did you make any New Year’s resolutions?

Share with us at [email protected].

Maybe it was a harbinger of better times coming our way this year. Twelve months ago the Rose Parade was canceled. But on Saturday the marching bands and flower-covered floats were back under blue skies in Pasadena. The rolling display put on by Kaiser Permanente was titled “A Healthier Future.” Amen.


Thanks for reading. We’ll be back in your inbox tomorrow.

P.S. Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Something for a golfer, poker player or sandwich maker (4 letters).

Soumya Karlamangla, Jonah Candelario and Mariel Wamsley contributed to California Today. You can reach the team at [email protected].

Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox.



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I-80 Reopens to Limited Traffic After Extended Snowy Sierra Road Travel Nightmare – CBS San Francisco


DONNER SUMMIT (CBS13/CBS SF) — State agencies have partially reopened Interstate 80 to both westbound and eastbound Tuesday evening after an extended shutdown due to a severe holiday snowstorm.

Just before 3 p.m. Tuesday, Caltrans said eastbound I-80 had been reopened to passenger vehicles and essential commercial vehicles only, while westbound traffic was still closed from the Nevada State Line to Colfax. Chain controls were in effect for eastbound I-80 travelers from 3.4 miles east of Gold Run to the Nevada State Line.

READ MORE: The ‘Deluge Is Here’; Health Official Warns Of New Year’s Eve Gatherings Spreading Omicron

It wouldn’t be until after 9 p.m. that I-80 opened to westbound traffic, and then only for essential commercial trucks and vehicles, according to Caltrans.

On Tuesday afternoon, Caltrans tweeted that traffic on U.S. Highway 50 in South Lake Tahoe was at capacity and had essentially come to a standstill.

“If you don’t need to travel today, please don’t,” a Twitter post showing the traffic map for the area read. “Your best option for an alternate route is to stay put.”

The roadway was closed from 8.3 miles east of Placerville to Meyers, but fully reopened Monday night.

Highway 50 wasn’t without its problems on Tuesday. In the morning, it was also closed after a semi-truck jackknifed in the area Sand Flat and Meyers.

Just after noon on Tuesday, Caltrans announced Highway 50 had again reopened. Drivers should still expect serious residual delays for the time being, and chain controls remain in effect east of Placerville to Meyers.

Caltrans says falling trees remain a constant obstacle to reopening I-80.

READ MORE: San Francisco New Year’s Eve Fireworks Show Canceled Over COVID Surge

Both freeways have seen closures since the weekend due to low visibility, heavy snow, downed power lines and downed trees across the roads.

Several parts of Highway 88 (from Dew Drop to 3.5 miles east of Silver Lake, 3.5 miles east of Silver Lake to Kirkwood, 2 miles east of Kirkwood to 5 miles west of Picketts Junction, and Picketts Junction to Woodfords) are also closed.

Highway 89 is also closed from Eagle Point Campground to Bliss State Park and from Sierraville to Sattley.

The challenging weather conditions were also slowing the search for 43-year-old Rory Angelotta, of Truckee, who has been missing ever since he was last seen Saturday morning at the Northstar ski resort.

According to the Placer County Sheriff’s Office, Angelotta was reported missing when he failed to show up for dinner Saturday night with friends. His car was found in the resort parking lot and his calls went straight to voicemail.

The Placer County Sheriff’s Office responded and immediately dispatched additional emergency resources including Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue, Nevada County Search and Rescue and Northstar Ski Patrol on Sunday.

The investigation has revealed that around 11:30 a.m., Angelotta’s ski pass was scanned at the Comstock lift. There was no other activity registered to his pass since that time.

“Searchers responded and combed the mountain and surrounding areas, despite extreme weather,” the Placer County Sheriff’s Department said. “Rescue personnel were on skis, snowmobiles, and a snowcat during their search. They faced high avalanche danger, strong winds, whiteout flurries, frigid temperatures, and heavy snow loads before calling off their search in the evening.”

MORE NEWS: Car Strikes, Critically Injures Pedestrian Crossing Street In Pleasanton

The sheriff said Angelotta was an experienced skier and was believed to have avalanche equipment on him.





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I-80 Partially Reopened, Hwy 50 Gridlocked In Snowy Sierra Road Travel Nightmare – CBS San Francisco


DONNER SUMMIT (CBS13/CBS SF) — With heavy snow still a problem traveling through the Sierra Tuesday afternoon, Interstate Highway 80 was partially reopened, while U.S. Highway 50 was gridlocked as travelers struggled to get to and from Lake Tahoe.

Just before 3 p.m. Tuesday, Caltrans said eastbound I-80 had been reopened to passenger vehicles and essential commercial vehicles only, while westbound traffic was still closed from the Nevada State Line to Colfax. Chain controls were in effect for eastbound I-80 travelers from 3.4 miles east of Gold Run to the Nevada State Line.

READ MORE: UPDATE: More Resources Deployed in Search for Missing Truckee Skier Rory Angelotta

On Tuesday afternoon, Caltrans tweeted that traffic on U.S. Highway 50 in South Lake Tahoe was at capacity and had essentially come to a standstill.

“If you don’t need to travel today, please don’t,” a Twitter post showing the traffic map for the area read. “Your best option for an alternate route is to stay put.”

The roadway was closed from 8.3 miles east of Placerville to Meyers, but fully reopened Monday night.

Highway 50 wasn’t without its problems on Tuesday. In the morning, it was also closed after a semi-truck jackknifed in the area Sand Flat and Meyers.

Just after noon on Tuesday, Caltrans announced Highway 50 had again reopened. Drivers should still expect serious residual delays for the time being, and chain controls remain in effect east of Placerville to Meyers.

Caltrans says falling trees remain a constant obstacle to reopening I-80.

Both freeways have seen closures since the weekend due to low visibility, heavy snow, downed power lines and downed trees across the roads.

READ MORE: Contra Costa County Tightens Indoor Masking Requirements Regardless of Vaccination Status

Several parts of Highway 88 (from Dew Drop to 3.5 miles east of Silver Lake, 3.5 miles east of Silver Lake to Kirkwood, 2 miles east of Kirkwood to 5 miles west of Picketts Junction, and Picketts Junction to Woodfords) are also closed.

Highway 89 is also closed from Eagle Point Campground to Bliss State Park and from Sierraville to Sattley.

The challenging weather conditions were also slowing the search for 43-year-old Rory Angelotta, of Truckee, who has been missing ever since he was last seen Saturday morning at the Northstar ski resort.

According to the Placer County Sheriff’s Office, Angelotta was reported missing when he failed to show up for dinner Saturday night with friends. His car was found in the resort parking lot and his calls went straight to voicemail.

The Placer County Sheriff’s Office responded and immediately dispatched additional emergency resources including Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue, Nevada County Search and Rescue and Northstar Ski Patrol on Sunday.

The investigation has revealed that around 11:30 a.m., Angelotta’s ski pass was scanned at the Comstock lift. There was no other activity registered to his pass since that time.

“Searchers responded and combed the mountain and surrounding areas, despite extreme weather,” the Placer County Sheriff’s Department said. “Rescue personnel were on skis, snowmobiles, and a snowcat during their search. They faced high avalanche danger, strong winds, whiteout flurries, frigid temperatures, and heavy snow loads before calling off their search in the evening.”

MORE NEWS: Santa Cruz Supes Declare Local Emergency After Atmospheric River Storm Causes $3M In Damage

The sheriff said Angelotta was an experienced skier and was believed to have avalanche equipment on him.





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Pandemic travel news: Monaco and San Marino top ‘very high’ risk travel list


Editor’s Note — Sign up for Unlocking the World, CNN Travel’s weekly newsletter. Get news about destinations opening and closing, inspiration for future adventures, plus the latest in aviation, food and drink, where to stay and other travel developments.

(CNN) — As Omicron grips the world, the only person enjoying frictionless global travel this Christmas is Santa, thanks to his very well-ventilated sleigh.

CNN Travel wishes you happy holidays if you’re celebrating and for better times ahead for those missing loved ones this year.

Here are the biggest developments in travel this week.

Omicron is hammering holiday travel

Ski season is soldiering on, under straitened circumstances, so if you have a fondness for fondue, here’s our guide to the best ski resorts. Be sure to keep an eye on restrictions before booking.

Destinations climbing to the top of the CDC’s risk list

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added eight new destinations to its highest-risk category for travel. They include Finland, Lebanon and the country that was the world’s second most-visited nation before Covid came along.

The microstates of Monaco and San Marino — two of the world’s wealthiest countries — shot straight up to the highest-risk Level 4 on Monday, having previously been categorized “Unknown.”

There is some good news for southern Africa this week. The US plans to lift travel restrictions on eight countries in the region that were imposed after Omicron was discovered in South Africa in late November.

The US is cracking down

And, in the final piece of not-so-good news for Americans, the price of a US passport is about to soar.

Asia-Pacific is cautious

Luang Prabang is the ancient capital of Laos.

Luang Prabang is the ancient capital of Laos.

Shutterstock

Coronavirus has messed with China’s biggest holiday for the third year in a row. The country’s National Health Commission has advised residents in any city with confirmed Covid cases against traveling during February’s Lunar New Year and Spring Festival holiday.
Thailand has suspended its quarantine-free travel pass, with no word on when it might be reinstated, while New Zealand has delayed its border reopening from January 17 to the end of February.
The landlocked nation of Laos, however, will begin the first phase of its reopening on January 1, with the whole country expected to be open for business by July 1, 2022. Great news for fans of ornate Buddhist temples, French colonial architecture and epic mountain landscapes.

Strike these spots off your 2022 bucket list

Some are getting spruced up or extended to make them better than ever when they do welcome guests, but for others it’s a permanent farewell.

And now for Christmas feasts

Even when we can’t travel to be together, we can still share food traditions. From Mexico to France, here’s a look at how nations around the world feast at Christmas. We hope you’re diving into something delicious.

In case you missed it

Sweden’s famous ‘Yule Goat’ was set on fire by vandals.

This city has underground stations that are like works of art.

Why you really should know more about Tashkent.

These abandoned sites are overrun by nature.



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No.11/12 Women’s Basketball defeats San Diego, 74-58


LAS VEGAS— Junior Aliyah Matharu recorded a team-high 22 points Sunday afternoon to help propel No.11/12 Texas to a 74-58 victory over San Diego in the Pac-12 U.S. LBM Coast-to-Coast Challenge at T-Mobile Arena.

UT runs their record to 8-1 on the season with the win. San Diego falls to 7-4.

The Toreros stepped in to face the Longhorns on less than 24 hours’ notice when UT’s original opponent, No. 4/8 Arizona, withdrew due to COVID-19 protocol on Saturday.  

Matharu finished the game shooting 7-of-13 from the floor and was 2-of-5 on her three-point attempts. The D.C. native now has three 20-plus point performances on the season and has scored in double-figures in 8-of-9 contests.

Sophomore DeYona Gaston posted her second double-double of the season finishing with 11 points and a team-high 10 rebounds. Joanne Allen-Taylor (10 points) and Audrey Warren (10) were the other Longhorns to finish in double digits.

Texas finished the game shooting 46.3 percent (25-of-54) from the floor and shot 61.1 percent (22-of-36) from the charity stripe. The Longhorns outrebounded the Toreros, 36-29, and held a slight advantage in the turnover battle, 21-19.

San Diego was led offensively by Kiera Oakry who posted 16 points. Laure Eikstrup finished with nine points and Kasey Nuebert led the team on the glass with nine rebounds.  

The Toreros shot 35.1 percent (20-of-57) from the field and 30.8 percent (4-of-13) from behind the arc in the game.

Texas returns to action Wednesday, Dec.22, as they travel to the east coast for a matchup with Princeton. Tip is slated for 11 a.m. CT and will air on ESPN+

Join the Texas Fight today – we’ve got enough of it to go around. View your ticket options HERE:





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Letter to Birdland | San Francisco treat | Travel


This week we flew the coop for San Francisco to visit our youngest, Ellis, who recently settled the city proper after bouncing around in various suburbs.

When he first moved in, we were video chatting with him and his sweetheart, Dev, who told us that their new neighborhood used to be the Hippie Capital of the World.

“Why the Hippie Capital of the World,” I said, bemused, “is Haight-Ashbury.”

“That’s it! We live in Haight-Ashbury.”

“You live in Haight-Ashbury? How did you manage that?”

And they gave us a video tour of their apartment in a 100-year-old building with thick, white paint on the walls and built-in bookcases and cabinets and a pocket door that opens up the spare bedroom into the living room for one big party space.

Well, we had to see it in person, so Michael and I found ourselves at the airport. We swore we’d be independent and our boy wouldn’t have to take time off to entertain us. We could surely amuse ourselves, and maybe get dinner with him in the evenings. But he had other ideas. Not only did he pick us up from the airport, but he took off work and had the weekend planned out.

On Friday, he took us to Cal Academy — a science museum in Golden Gate Park. Is it a museum, or is it a zoo? Maybe both? We took the afternoon to explore just one part of it.

The Rainforest is a dome with a gently spiraling ramp that took us from the forest floor, where we peeked into a leafcutter ant colony (they were too busy carrying big slices of leaves to their den to chat with us), saw millipedes rumbling about in a glass case, searched for frogs and snakes in terrariums (and sometimes found them), and looked down into a lagoon full of fish. I saw a giant fish (longer than my 6-foot son) surface and then dive down again before I could get anyone to look.

We wound our way up through various levels of tropical plants and displays — palms, philodendron, orchids. Birdsong accompanied us as we climbed to the canopy, and we saw large blue and orange parrots and small blue headed tanagers flying around and perching on trees.

The higher we got, the more butterflies we saw, some a little like our Red Admirals only bigger, some blue ones the size of a saucer. When we got to the top, we stepped into the elevator, which had a sign warning us to check for hitchhiking butterflies. We didn’t see any, and the elevator took us down to the basement, where we could walk through a tunnel under the aquarium and let the fish swim above us and all around.

When we stepped out into the sunshine, we wanted a snack, but by the time we got our soft pretzel, the fog had crept up out of nowhere.

Ellis told us the San Francisco fog has a name: Karl. He even has his own Twitter account.

We didn’t see much of him on our visit. When he came, he made a sudden appearance and was gone just as quickly. We walked back through the Panhandle, and by the time we finished our pretzels and churros, Karl had dissipated. But that was not the last we would see of him.

The next morning, Ellis’ old friend, Joey, met us for brunch. They have been friends since they were 3, and both left the prairie to be California boys.

After breakfast, Joey would join us for a sailing trip. Ellis had booked us a two-hour tour on the San Francisco Bay. We walked out to the end of the pier past a beautiful stone lighthouse. The doorway had been filled in with more stone, perhaps because the light was now electrical and no longer needed tending.

Captain John asked us where we would like to go, and we decided to sail under the Golden Gate Bridge. I sat in a special seat on the stern while the two boys sat chatting on the deck up near the bow. The wind was mild, and pretty soon, Michael joined them.

I watched the water and the boats go back and forth, Alcatraz receding as we approached the bridge.

Every once in a while, a flock of dark pelicans would swoop down and skim over the water. Karl made his appearance as we were sailing back to port, but he never caught up with us.

Later, Michael told me he saw a seal on the rocks as we went under the bridge, but I missed it. I was perfectly happy to sit and watch the boys laughing and talking, watch the pelicans skim over the water, and thinking what a good host our son is.

Walk in Beauty; Work in Peace; Blessed Be

Mary Lucille Hays lives in Birdland near White Heath. You can livestream stingrays from the Cal Academy with the Stingrays Live app. You can follow Karl the fog at instagram.com/KarlTheFog/ or twitter.com/KarlTheFog. You can see pictures about this week’s post on Instagram @BirdlandLetters. Mary can be reached at [email protected] or via snail mail care of the Journal-Republican, 118 E. Washington St., Monticello, IL 61856. She wants to thank her friends for writing and will answer you all soon.





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Wags and wheels – The San Diego Union-Tribune


Randy Lazar is a 60-year-old adventurer with a serious traveling itch.

In 2015, after attending many presentations by motorcycle world travelers and hosting more than 25 global travelers at his San Diego home over ten years, he got the bug himself and began traveling in a custom sidecar with his dog Doc Holliday. In 2017 and 2018, the pair began touring the U.S. and, as design weaknesses became apparent, modified the rig to take advantage of future pavement as well as dirt.

The goal? Perhaps, circumnavigating the globe.

Randy and Doc are currently in Mexico headed south toward Tierra del Fuego at the tip of South America.

They are sharing their adventures and photos on the Internet through Facebook posts, as well as on the San Diego Adventure Riders forums page at sandiegoadventureriders.com.

Q: Financed with your own money and little or no sponsors, talk a bit about your bike choice for the rig.?

A: I wanted a used but reliable shaft-drive bike with good power. An older (Yamaha) Tenere can’t cancel the ABS, and the newer ones have complicated electronic suspensions and so forth. I felt the same with the newer BMWs. After discussing bike choices with a friend over fish tacos in Ocean Beach, we figured a 2003-ish BMW 1150 GS would be ideal … no complicated ECU systems, no ABS, minimal electronics. I happened to check Craigslist that night and I found a 2003 1150 GS with 9,500 miles and bought it.

Doc.

Doc wears protective eyewear in the Arizona desert.

(Randy Lazar)

Q: The sidecar is a basic kit from Holland that you modified a few times. Explain the mechanics.

A: The main parts — wheels, subframe and leading-link front suspension — came from EZS Sidecar in the Netherlands, and I commissioned the construction and completion of the sidecar body in August 2015. We had the body built large enough for Doc to stand, turn around and lie down in comfortably, and it has a removable canvas top for sun protection. Since the kit was basically designed for street use, it’s been modified as needed, including raising the rear storage box and modifying the subframe to gain more ground clearance. I explored modifying the drive to power both rear wheels, but that wasn’t practical. The leading-link suspension and sidecar mods allow me to run car rims and automotive tubeless tires.

Q: Talk about Doc. What does he add to the ride as well as require?

A: I got Doc from the (animal shelter) in 2013, so he’s now about eight 8 years old. He’s half German shepherd and half Great Pyrenees. When I realized traveling by sidecar with a dog was possible, I planned the trip around him. He’s such an awesome traveler and an adventurous boy. He loves doing stuff like this, he loves the outdoors, and he just loves being with me. He draws a lot of attention both in and out of the sidecar because he’s an unusual-looking mixed breed. I have to carry enough water so when it’s hot I can wet him down and keep him hydrated. I have to plan for him and replenish the best food I can find for him. After a few weeks in Mexico, we ran out of kibble. In small towns, you can only find cheap dog food of poor quality. So, in big cities, I’ll search for a Petco and buy the best kibble I can get. I supplement his kibble with lightly cooked chicken, beef or fish because I want him to eat healthy and I also carry supplements for him. Doc has goggles for dust and wind. He has a doggy jacket for cold weather and a wool blanket for our tent. He has a custom dog pillow that fills the floor of the sidecar for his comfort and goes in the tent as needed. My order of priorities is dog-bike-human. He’s my buddy and my top priority. I have to take care of him first. Then the rig second. I come last.

Q: Talk a bit about your connections to the outside world. What do you have to stay in touch or for emergencies?

A: I’ve got my laptop, my regular cellphone, plus another vibration-resistant Kyocera military-grade phone that I use strictly for Google maps and GPS. I use my backup Garmin GPS for speed and odometer since the BMW speedo drive had to be disconnected because of changing the rims. I download maps of each country into the phone GPS as needed. I have a Garmin InReach emergency locator beacon that allows me to text people if I need help and contact emergency services using the SOS button, if needed. We have a custom solar panel on the top box that maintains the bike battery. It has two USB ports that service my phones and backup battery. Unfortunately, I can’t solar charge my (computer) since they don’t make a compatible USB cable, so I rarely use the Mac unless I’m at a hotel or can get regular power, then I can catch up on my trip reports.

Doc taking in the views at Copper Canyon in northern Mexico.

Doc taking in the views at Copper Canyon in northern Mexico.

(Randy Lazar)

Q: Talk about the day-to-day issues: food, lodging, travel costs. Do you have a planned route?

A: I’ve been to many travel presentations by world motorcyclists, and I’ve heard often that a lot of people overplan. So I think it’s best to have almost no plan. Or maybe just a general plan. The rig is built for dirt or pavement, so we’re ready for just about anything. Facebook has been an excellent resource for traveling. I’ve gotten many invites from people who read my posts and have offered their homes or services if I’m in their areas. Whenever anyone responds to one of my posts with an offer of help or info, I copy their info into my notes so I can refer to it in the future. Right now, I’m staying with a friend in Mexico who also has a sidecar and dog who rides with him. He is a great source of info. When we first crossed into Mexico, I traveled with a friend who I met four years ago. He recently split off on his own and headed for Mazatlán. We may meet and ride together again later.

Q: Do you have any trepidation? Have you ever been uneasy?

A: People are often worried about trouble with certain factions down here, but many of those factions usually don’t bother motorcyclists and tourists. I’m learning all this from the experienced local riders. I know many people who’ve been traveling Mexico for years and have never felt in any danger. The danger comes from the wannabe bad guys, they’re the ones what will rob you. I’ve gotten so much good advice from people that I’ve met who have traveled here extensively. You can get into a bad situation anywhere in the world, but if you’re nice, polite, smile, don’t act like you’re a threat, stay out of sketchy areas and aren’t looking for trouble, then most likely you’ll be fine.

Randy Lazar had a rig specially made for himself and for his dog Doc.

Randy Lazar had a rig specially made for himself and his dog Doc.

(Randy Lazar)

Q: What’s the end goal?

A: Originally, we wanted to go around the world. We traveled the U.S. for eight months seeing friends and family and we finished that in 2018. But a lot has happened since then with the COVID shutdown, and we had some financial setbacks when Doc had to have two major surgeries. But we’re back and we’ve been in Mexico two months now. So we’ll probably travel Mexico for six months, then head south to Guatemala and Central America, as long as the borders open up this year. Ultimately to the southern tip of South America at Ushuaia in Argentina. From there, maybe on to Europe. When people do this sort of thing and run out of money, they find ways to carry on, so we’ll see how it goes. Doc will be 10 years old by the time we get to Ushuaia and I would be hesitant to put him in the cargo hold of a plane for a long overseas flight.

Randy Lazar and his dog Doc.

Randy Lazar and his dog Doc.

(Randy Lazar)

Traveling along

Randy and Doc are having a true adventure where the unknown becomes the experience. It’s not the kind of trip for everyone, but these buddies are prepared.

“Traveling in the U.S. is easy. There are no language barriers and resources are everywhere. But traveling outside the States is a huge learning experience. Language is interesting. A few people speak some English. Otherwise, the Internet and a cellphone with Google Translate helps, or simple hand gestures,” said Lazar.

“We knew it would be an experience. That’s why we are traveling to experience other cultures and see new places.”

Lazar can be followed on Facebook and Instagram at Rad ’n Doc Travel the World, and on his home page at radndoc.com on the San Diego Adventure Riders website forums.

Michaud is a San Diego-based motorcycle writer and restorer. Send email to [email protected]





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Nuggets, Spurs tip off two-game series in San Antonio


The Denver Nuggets will have to dig deep for a reserve of energy when they square off against the host San Antonio Spurs on Thursday.

It will be the first of two games in three days between the two teams in San Antonio.

The Nuggets travel to the Alamo City for the second game of a road back-to-back on the heels of a 120-114 overtime win in New Orleans on Wednesday. Nikola Jokic racked up 39 points, 11 assists and 11 rebounds for the Nuggets, his fourth triple-double in just 19 games this season.

Eleven of Jokic’s points came in the extra period after he missed a 21-foot, last-second jumper that would have won the game in regulation.

Denver coach Michael Malone said after the game that there was a moment during overtime when he thought, “How lucky am I that I have the reigning MVP on the road in a close game?”

Will Barton added 20 points for Denver in the victory, with Monte Morris hitting for 11 and JaMychal Green and Aaron Gordon scoring 10 points.

The contests in San Antonio are the final two of a seven-games-in-13-days road trip for Denver, which has won three of the first five games on the sojourn.

“It feels like every city we go to we get a little smaller and smaller,” Malone said. “By the time we get to San Antonio, I hope I’m part of the team.”

“Mainly it’s about us just being together,” Green said, according to the Denver Post. “It’s a time for us to individually get to know each other off the floor.”

The Spurs return to the floor after a 121-109 home loss to the New York Knicks on Tuesday. The game was the second of a road-home back-to-back for San Antonio, which lost at Phoenix on Monday and has now dropped two in a row after a season-high, four-game winning streak.

Derrick White paced San Antonio with season-high 26 points on Tuesday. Dejounte Murray had 15, Doug McDermott and Jakob Poeltl added 13 each and Bryn Forbes scored 12 points. Murray has his streak of double-doubles snapped at seven.

The game was the first of five at home over an nine-day stretch for the Spurs.

“That first game being a back-to-back after a road trip, we knew that would be tough energy-wise,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said afterward. “I thought we competed our ass off. Guys gave their effort. I was really happy with that.”

San Antonio surrendered 17 offensive rebounds in the loss that led to 21 points for the Knicks. Keeping New York off the glass was a difficult challenge, according to Poeltl.

“We were trying to load up the defense a little bit, show help for a lot of their physical drivers,” Poeltl said. “I think we got a couple tough bounces. They were in good positions, obviously, and they are good offensive rebounders. Maybe there was a lack of physicality on my part.”

San Antonio likely will be without forward Keldon Johnson against the Nuggets after he sprained his right ankle late in the first half of the loss to New York. An MRI performed Wednesday revealed no structural damage to Johnson’s ankle.

The Nuggets have won the past three games in the series, most recently beating the Spurs 102-96 on Oct. 22 in Denver.

–Field Level Media

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