5 Hot Tips for Saving on Summer Travel


HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WAFF) – Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start of Summer. Summer is meant for adventure, but don’t let your money melt away during your trip.

WAFF talked with LeJuan George at Redstone Federal Credit Union. He offered these five tips for saving while still enjoying the journey and the destination.

  1. Pack light: Most airlines charge for checked bags, so keep your luggage light. Bring only a carry-on. You’ll speed up the check-in and arrival processes and start your summer fun sooner. Remember to review the airline’s policy for luggage weight and dimensions to avoid unexpected delays or fees.
  2. Use surcharge-free ATMs: Redstone gives you access to surcharge-free ATMs across the globe. Go to redfcu.org/location to find one near you.
  3. Plan ahead: If you’re planning on a road trip, schedule a routine checkup for your vehicle before heading out. Taking precautions helps you avoid a roadside breakdown. You don’t want to spend your vacation, budget, or time in a repair shop!
  4. Find the free stuff: You may be surprised how many free, fun activities you can find with a quick Google™ search. Look for “free activities” where you’re vacationing.
  5. Limit restaurant meals: Choose one meal each day to enjoy at a restaurant and purchase the rest of your food at a local grocery store. At a hotel, take advantage of any complimentary breakfast items and snacks. If you’re driving, pack food in a cooler.

Bottom Line: With a little forethought, you can save on expenses while savoring summer.

For more ways to save, be sure to tune in at noon every Friday for WAFF 48′s “Financial Friday” segment.

Copyright 2022 WAFF. All rights reserved.



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Memorial Day weekend 2022: Here are some fuel saving tips as gas nears $5 a gallon in Philadelphia region


PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — Gas prices continue to inch closer to $5 a gallon throughout the region.

Drivers are being forced to become resourceful and find ways to minimize the pain at the pump.

According to AAA, the average price of gas across the Philadelphia five-county region is now at $4.88 a gallon.

Here are some ways you can save.

AAA recommends that people take advantage of fuel rewards and discount programs. For instance, Wawa is offering a 15 cents per gallon discount if you pay using their mobile app now through June 12.
Grocery store chains like Giant offer a 10 cent discount for every $100 spent in their stores.

Gas companies also have rewards programs.

Exxon offers 3 cents off a gallon. Citgo offers 3 cents off per gallon with additional discounts on Tuesdays and Fridays. Sunoco also offers 3 cents off per gallon.

According to experts, staying on top of vehicle maintenance is key when it comes to savings.

Regular service will prolong fuel economy and your car’s performance.
Another big tip is to not let your car idle. Experts say most cars perform a lot better when you get in and start driving them.

While it’s always important to drive safely, AAA says studies have shown that personal driving habits are one of the biggest factors that affect fuel consumption.

It’s best to drive the speed limit, avoid quick acceleration and to take your foot off the gas early when approaching a stop. That way your car can coast before you brake.

Cruise control is another great option to save on gas, and get rid of any accessories on your vehicle.

Copyright © 2022 WPVI-TV. All Rights Reserved.





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Travel: Beat airlines’ extra costs with cheap flight tips from money saving expert | Travel News | Travel


Ellie said: “We know that even things like hen and stag do costs have rocketed over the past 10 years, in fact, Hotels.com found that costs have jumped 61 percent in the past decade, with the average celebration costing a huge £242.

“To try and make some savings when booking in bulk like this, make the most of reward schemes.

“On Hotels.com you get a stamp for every night stayed at the property, collect 10 stamps and you get a reward night, which will equate to the average value of the previous 10 stamps. An easy way to make savings.”

Airlines add charges for things like baggage allowance, baggage check-in, excess baggage, in-flight food, booking fees, check-in fees.

They also charge for seat selection, more for a seat with extra legroom.





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Money saving tips: Woman explains how she’s saved £500 | Personal Finance | Finance


While experts have been recommending cutting back on takeaways and subscriptions, Express.co.uk has discovered a fun way to save a fortune on travel this year.

A 46-year-old woman from York has shared how she saves money on travel by staying in stranger’s homes – for free.

She has enjoyed cheap holidays in exotic places like the French Réunion island south of Mauritius by not paying for accommodation or food.

Savvy Brits like Suzi Bewell are part of a ‘couch surfing’ phenomenon which could be about to become a lot more popular.

“I went to la Réunion island and stayed for three days with a family for free and I’ve had people from all over the world stay here in York,” Suzi told Express.co.uk.

READ MORE: NS&I explains how to increase chances of winning prize of up to £1m

She’s not the only one raving about sofa surfing as a means of saving money on travel.

While it’s easy to see how this way of life would be more appealing to the younger generation, surfing for seniors is also a thing.

On the Couchsurfing blog Paul Miniato wrote: “The average age of a Couchsurfer is 28, and only about three percent of users are over 50.”

Still with about five million members, that’s 150,000 ‘golden age’ surfers and hosts.”

However, he said the good news for travellers who might find a week on a sofa a little uncomfortable, is many people offer a private bedroom.

Jane Hawkes, consumer expert at ladyjaney.co.uk, said it’s a great way to save money.

She said: “Couch surfing is a novel way to get that much needed holiday for a fraction of the price.

“You can also get cost cutting travel tips, local info and advice from your hosts as to where to go and what to do.”

Couch surfers like Paul say it’s a once in a lifetime experience they’ll never forget.

“Our first Couchsurfing experience was in the seaside town of Sequim, Washington.

“Our host, Teresa, was both interesting and gracious, and the accommodation offered us by our new friend was as good as any an old friend might provide.

“Couchsurfing will be high on our list for our next trip.

“We’d recommend it for yours.”





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Travel nurse reflects on two years of saving patients from COVID


Justin Adams has spent more than 20 years in healthcare. He says COVID-19 has put a lot of stress and strain on him and his co-workers.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — When First Coast News last spoke with Justin Adams just before Christmas, he was trying to keep his head above water.

He says he was treading what he described as a wave of COVID-19 deaths, mostly from unvaccinated patients.

“It’s definitely taken a toll on all of us mentally,” he said.

Now, there’s some welcome news. At his 900 bed hospital in North Carolina, he says he’s now only treating a handful of patients. 

“Yesterday I worked, and I think we had one. It’s fluctuating between zero and two,” he told First Coast News. 

Adams is a traveling nurse and spent time earlier in the pandemic at a hospital in New Orleans.  

He’s had many bad days. We asked him about his worst.

“I think in a 12-hour shift we had eight people to die and had to put those people in body bags, and we had a back elevator that went straight to the morgue,” Adams recalled.

Despite the setbacks, he’s seen successes. It’s why he’s choosing to stay in a career many of his co-workers have left.

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects more than 275,000 additional nurses are needed through 2030.  

“There’s been a lot of people around the country trying to come up with ideas on nurse retention, but honestly I’m not sure what that solution is,” Adams said.

As for now, he’s still putting on his scrubs, knowing his patients still need him.

RELATED: JSO: Jacksonville man charged with DUI after crashing into food truck, causing 3rd-degree burns for owner

RELATED: Pope hails health care workers as heroes

RELATED: Lucky Charms! These Tennessee newborns are in the St. Patrick’s Day spirit



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Tips for planning, saving money


ORLANDO, Fla.This article first appeared in our Help Me Hank Newsletter. Click here to sign up for the newsletter, or use the form at the bottom of the article.


Greetings from the happiest (and in my opinion, the most expensive) place on Earth.

This week, my family made our way down to Disney World in Orlando, Florida. It was a great trip.

This type of trip, especially in this economy, takes some time and creativity to plan. I also learned some things from other parents, so I thought I would share some hacks with you all this week!

Planning your trip

First of all, if you want to go to Disney World this year or next, start planning now.

We started booking “moments” (i.e.: a meeting with Princess Belle) in January this year. These activities fill up fast. You can do a lot on your own using the Disney app, or you can hire (not cheap) a Disney insider or travel agent to assist.

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Disney does have representatives available who can offer free tips and help.

AAA sometimes offers discounts on tickets to the resort, and other insurance providers may, too (especially when it comes to car rentals). Some employers offer discounts on everything from hotels to park hoppers, so check with your work team during your planning.

At the park

We decided to go to the park each day at 11 a.m. Were told the 8 a.m. rush lines are long, and we wanted to avoid that. Going at 11 a.m., we never got stuck in line!

The parks are filled with employees who are there to help. We would often ask the staff members: “If you had 1 hour right now, where would you go?” They pointed us into some great pockets of the park that we may have otherwise ignored.

I waited until we were in Orlando to buy all the Disney swag. We bought all of our Disney hats, t-shirts and glasses at CVS and Walmart, rather than in the park.

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Inside the Disney resort, a shirt costs around $29, while at CVS, shirts were $9 or cheaper. Rather than splurge on clothes, save your cash and splurge on an experience in the park that your little one may remember.

Also, keep in mind that you can bring water and snacks into Disney World. Again, I loaded up on food and water at CVS, and it saved us a lot of money. A bottle of regular water can cost $5.99 in the park.

Overall tips

There are thousands and thousands of black strollers at Disney. Some people made signs or tied balloons onto their strollers to make theirs stand out. It’s a great idea. Sometimes, Disney staff members move your stroller when you’re on a ride, and it can be hard to find afterward.

(WDIV)

The crowds are huge, and while we always held hands as we walked, the thought of losing your little one is terrifying. Some suggest discretely writing your name or number on a name tag, or placing an Apple AirTag in your child’s pocket. Safety first, right?

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Finally: Have fun! Friends reminded me to enjoy the moment. It can be a stressful experience, but these are moments that go by so fast.

If you have any tips or suggestions, let me know. We can all learn from each other.

Happy travels! Be well. – Hank

Email me or check out @HelpMeHank

hmh (WDIV)

☎️ Drop us a line

Do you have a story you’d like us to look into? You can always get in touch with the Help Me Hank team by shooting us an email, or filling out the form here. You can also call our volunteer tip line: 313-634-WDIV (313-634-9348).

You can find the latest Help Me Hank reports right here on ClickOnDetroit.

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Travel Tips: Saving Money & Planning Your Next Trip | Quench Your Adventure


https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=3jNiaX_0fTiPnuX00

Quench Your Adventure

Flights: We use Google Flights often and use the “explore” feature to find the cheapest places to fly. It’s easy to view prices for entire months. We don’t check any luggage and we fly whatever time is cheapest. Also, use Incognito so there are no saved cookies that can increase prices.

Accommodations: We mostly find budget accommodations. A room or part of someone’s home and hostels. We often use Airbnb and Booking. We’ve always stayed in private rooms, but have shared a bathroom a few times. We’re looking forward to using TrustedHousesitters for a couple free stays abroad and hopefully a bit of Couchsurfing eventually.

Travel Insurance: SafetyWing is one of the few policies that covers Covid-19, and they have cheap monthly policies that are great for Digital Nomads and long-term travelers!

Travel Credit Card: We book ALL of our travel with our favorite travel credit card, the Chase Sapphire Preferred. Not only do we earn loads of points that we spend on more travel, but the card offers fantastic travel perks like no foreign transaction fees, trip delay and cancellation coverage, lost baggage reimbursement, and rental car coverage, which helps protect us.

Vaccines & Meds: We use the travel guides on the CDC website to help guide us for international trips.

Tours: We enjoy booking guided tours, especially since they often include transportation and English speaking guides. We’ve used GetYourGuide’s mobile app, TripAdvisor, and sometimes we just walk around, get quotes, negotiate, etc.

Transportation: We use Rome2Rio as a guide. It will tell you how to get almost anywhere, but it’s imperfect. We have leaned heavily on our hosts to get info about public transit and oftentimes its necessary to just show up at the bus station to ask questions.

We hope this is helpful and welcome any other tips on these topics. Do you use any of these resources?



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3 tips for saving money on summer travel despite higher oil prices


This article is reprinted by permission from NerdWallet

When I originally pitched the idea for this article, it was titled, “What $100 oil could mean for your summer travel.” Back then, $100 oil seemed like a distant possibility. Then prices spiked to over $120 before settling back down to a mere $100. By the time you read this … who knows.

The point is, nobody can predict what will happen to oil
CL.1,
-0.20%

next, yet everybody is curious how it will impact long-delayed summer travel plans. Does it make sense to book flights sooner or later? Is it better to drive or fly? And does anybody remember how to siphon gas? (Asking for a friend.)

If you don’t feel like reading this whole article, here’s the gist:

  • Airfares are going up, but not as much as you might think.

  • Renting and fueling a vehicle will be more expensive than usual.

  • To find a deal, visit cities with good public transportation.

The end of cheap airfare?

The last two years have been a halcyon era for cheap airfare, if little else. Yes, prices are rising quickly now, but unlike food and other inflation-afflicted expenses, they’re rising from a much lower baseline.

My colleague Sally French dug into inflation data to show that flight costs still have a long way to go before they become expensive by historical standards. Even though jet fuel prices have gone way up lately, airfare hasn’t followed quite the same trajectory.

Why? Fuel costs only account for about 30% of operating costs for airlines, according to Hopper, a travel booking platform. So an increase in fuel prices doesn’t necessarily result in a one-to-one increase in airfare. And airlines have ways (such as financial hedging maneuvers that I won’t pretend to understand) of defraying these costs.

All that said, fuel costs and demand are certainly driving prices up. So booking sooner rather than later is a good bet.

See: How to choose the best seat on a plane

Driving is, like, really expensive

The uptick in price for airplane tickets might not kill your summer travel budget, but other transportation costs could. We all know the pain of filling a tank of gas these days. Even if you’re prepared to pay more for fuel, will you even be able to find a rental car? Has their availability normalized since last summer’s shortage?

In a word: Nope.

The average price of rental cars remains outrageously high, costing 39% more in February 2022 than in February 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to the “measly” 7% increase in lodging costs over the same period and you get the picture. Rental car prices are way more inflated than other parts of a potential travel budget.

Pair that with astronomical fuel prices and reportedly higher rideshare fares, and the message is clear: If you can avoid vacations that require renting a car or driving long distances, do so.

In fact …

Remember cities?

National parks are cool, but they’re so summer 2020.

Snarkiness aside, there are good financial reasons to avoid far-flung rural destinations and target bigger, more transit-friendly cities instead. I’ve already talked about how expensive driving will be, but there’s another factor at play: demand. Everyone is still booking travel to rural destinations for some reason, which means you should do the opposite.

You might like: Six towns worth visiting for their historic downtowns

Data from AirDNA, a vacation rental tracking platform, suggests that demand for vacation rentals already exceeds pre-pandemic levels across the board. But that recovery is far from uniformly distributed. Coastal urban areas — AKA big cities with good public transportation — still lag far behind other markets. For instance, vacation rental bookings in New York City were down 47% in February 2022 compared to February 2020.

That number is stunning on its own, but it gets downright head-scratching when you consider that New York City is one of the easiest destinations to visit without renting a car. In other words, it might be financially prudent to visit the Big Apple this year.

When in the history of humanity has that ever been true?

Check out: 7 off-the-radar places worth stopping on a California road trip

Crude estimates

Nobody knows what will happen to oil prices. And frankly, we don’t even really know how much oil prices will affect airfare prices this summer. But we do know one thing: Driving a car, especially a rented car, will be very expensive.

Read: How to invest as inflation, higher interest rates and war roil markets

You might already have your heart set on visiting Maui, where a rental car is all but required, in which case you’ll just have to eat the expense. But if you can switch your priorities, zig where others zag and target big cities that are easy to navigate without a car, you could salvage your  budget despite rising fuel costs.

Now someone please tell my friend whether you’re supposed to take your mouth off the siphon hose before or after the gas starts flowing.

More From NerdWallet

Sam Kemmis writes for NerdWallet. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @samsambutdif.



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3 tips for saving money on summer travel despite higher oil prices


This article is reprinted by permission from NerdWallet

When I originally pitched the idea for this article, it was titled, “What $100 oil could mean for your summer travel.” Back then, $100 oil seemed like a distant possibility. Then prices spiked to over $120 before settling back down to a mere $100. By the time you read this … who knows.

The point is, nobody can predict what will happen to oil
CL.1,
+3.35%

next, yet everybody is curious how it will impact long-delayed summer travel plans. Does it make sense to book flights sooner or later? Is it better to drive or fly? And does anybody remember how to siphon gas? (Asking for a friend.)

If you don’t feel like reading this whole article, here’s the gist:

  • Airfares are going up, but not as much as you might think.

  • Renting and fueling a vehicle will be more expensive than usual.

  • To find a deal, visit cities with good public transportation.

The end of cheap airfare?

The last two years have been a halcyon era for cheap airfare, if little else. Yes, prices are rising quickly now, but unlike food and other inflation-afflicted expenses, they’re rising from a much lower baseline.

My colleague Sally French dug into inflation data to show that flight costs still have a long way to go before they become expensive by historical standards. Even though jet fuel prices have gone way up lately, airfare hasn’t followed quite the same trajectory.

Why? Fuel costs only account for about 30% of operating costs for airlines, according to Hopper, a travel booking platform. So an increase in fuel prices doesn’t necessarily result in a one-to-one increase in airfare. And airlines have ways (such as financial hedging maneuvers that I won’t pretend to understand) of defraying these costs.

All that said, fuel costs and demand are certainly driving prices up. So booking sooner rather than later is a good bet.

See: How to choose the best seat on a plane

Driving is, like, really expensive

The uptick in price for airplane tickets might not kill your summer travel budget, but other transportation costs could. We all know the pain of filling a tank of gas these days. Even if you’re prepared to pay more for fuel, will you even be able to find a rental car? Has their availability normalized since last summer’s shortage?

In a word: Nope.

The average price of rental cars remains outrageously high, costing 39% more in February 2022 than in February 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to the “measly” 7% increase in lodging costs over the same period and you get the picture. Rental car prices are way more inflated than other parts of a potential travel budget.

Pair that with astronomical fuel prices and reportedly higher rideshare fares, and the message is clear: If you can avoid vacations that require renting a car or driving long distances, do so.

In fact …

Remember cities?

National parks are cool, but they’re so summer 2020.

Snarkiness aside, there are good financial reasons to avoid far-flung rural destinations and target bigger, more transit-friendly cities instead. I’ve already talked about how expensive driving will be, but there’s another factor at play: demand. Everyone is still booking travel to rural destinations for some reason, which means you should do the opposite.

You might like: Six towns worth visiting for their historic downtowns

Data from AirDNA, a vacation rental tracking platform, suggests that demand for vacation rentals already exceeds pre-pandemic levels across the board. But that recovery is far from uniformly distributed. Coastal urban areas — AKA big cities with good public transportation — still lag far behind other markets. For instance, vacation rental bookings in New York City were down 47% in February 2022 compared to February 2020.

That number is stunning on its own, but it gets downright head-scratching when you consider that New York City is one of the easiest destinations to visit without renting a car. In other words, it might be financially prudent to visit the Big Apple this year.

When in the history of humanity has that ever been true?

Check out: 7 off-the-radar places worth stopping on a California road trip

Crude estimates

Nobody knows what will happen to oil prices. And frankly, we don’t even really know how much oil prices will affect airfare prices this summer. But we do know one thing: Driving a car, especially a rented car, will be very expensive.

Read: How to invest as inflation, higher interest rates and war roil markets

You might already have your heart set on visiting Maui, where a rental car is all but required, in which case you’ll just have to eat the expense. But if you can switch your priorities, zig where others zag and target big cities that are easy to navigate without a car, you could salvage your  budget despite rising fuel costs.

Now someone please tell my friend whether you’re supposed to take your mouth off the siphon hose before or after the gas starts flowing.

More From NerdWallet

Sam Kemmis writes for NerdWallet. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @samsambutdif.



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