Spain: British expats share ‘brilliant’ tip to avoid residency issues in Spain | Travel News | Travel


On the official British Embassy Facebook page ‘Brits in Spain’ the Embassy posted: “We know that some of you have yet to exchange your green residency certificate for the Withdrawal Agreement TIE.” The TIE is a biometric card that contains the identity details of a foreigner who lives in Spain.

“And since February this year, we’ve had shiny new TIEs, which have made life so much easier.

“Absolutely brilliant. I definitely recommend anybody to apply for it. Very straightforward, you do practically everything online.

“Sort out your appointments online. Download the application form and fill it in online and just turn up with that, proof that you’ve paid the tax, take your green card, your passport, your padron certificate.

“They do things in the computer and take your fingerprints. And then six weeks later you get one of these.

DON’T MISS

“And really it has made travel an awful lot easier. If you, for example, if you leave or enter Spain, make sure that you present this together with your passport and you shouldn’t get your passport stamped.

“So definitely recommend that. And if you come back into the Schengen Zone, this just looks so much more official than the green card.

“It says residence permit in three different languages. On the back it says that we’ve got our right reserved under the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement.

“So a win-win. Yeah, definitely win-win. It’s also a lot more durable than the old green card or A4 paper certificate.

“It’s credit card sized, so it slips into your wallet or purse. Yeah, definitely recommend it. Go for it.”

British expats need to apply for Spanish residency if they want to live in Spain for more than 90 days out of 180.

Since Brexit, British people are allowed to visit the Schengen Zone for 90 days in every 180 which has impacted some expats without residency.

Seasonal expats, sometimes known as ‘swallows’, used to visit Spain for the winter months to escape the UK’s cold weather.

Swallows without residency will not be able to visit Spain for more than 90 days at a time without breaking the law.

British expats now need to apply for Spanish residency from the UK after the deadline to apply from Spain passed in December.

They will need to prove they had healthcare in place as well as demonstrate they were living in Spain in 2020.

This can be difficult and proof can include bank statements, restaurant receipts and medical bills.





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Expats: British buyers return to Spain ‘looking for golf properties’ | Travel News | Travel


Marc Pritchard is the sales and marketing director at Taylor Wimpey España and he told Express.co.uk that UK sales are on the rise again after Covid. Taylor Wimpey España sells properties across Spain including in the Costa del Sol and Costa Blanca.

Pritchard told Express.co.uk: “UK buyers are clearly returning to Spain, based on our leads and sales figures.

“They led sales in October, buying more homes than any other nationality, and November has started strongly too.”

Although gaining Spanish residency has become more difficult after Brexit, many Britons are still looking to purchase second homes.

As British people can stay in Spain for 90 out of every 180 days, second home owners will still be able to spend several months a year at their property after Brexit.

READ MORE: British expat town in France sees drop in numbers – ‘rollercoaster’

Pritchard said: “In particular we’ve found UK buyers are seeking properties in the Costa del Sol, in a price bracket of €300,000 to €500,000 (£251,727- £419,545).

“We’ve seen an uptick in purchases along the Costa Blanca and on Mallorca too.”

Popular expat areas in the Costa del Sol include Fuengirola, Calahonda, Marbella and Estepona.

Recently, British expats have also been opting for hillside properties in towns such as Benahavis and Mijas.

DON’T MISS

British expats searching for a place in the Costa Blanca region often opt for the area around the popular tourist locations of Benidorm and Alicante.

Properties on the beautiful island of Mallorca are also growing in popularity with expats opting for easy beach access.

Pritchard told Express.co.uk that one particular type of property is extremely popular with British buyers.

He said: “Many Brits are looking for golf properties, with their extensive greenery and spacious surroundings.

“I think knowing that nothing will be built in front of you, as you are on a golf course, is a key part of the appeal, along with the picturesque, well maintained outlook.”

Golf properties have also soared in popularity in the sunny Spanish region of Murcia with Britons seeking great views.

The Costa del Sol is often known as the Costa del Golf due to the multiple golf courses along the coastline.

Gold properties normally come with an expansive terrace offering spectacular views of the golf course and beach.

Pritchard added: “We’ve also seen more British clients looking for properties in the €500,000+ (£419,00) price bracket recently, as these properties enable buyers to apply for a Spanish golden visa.”

A Spanish golden visa allows expats to gain residency in Spain if they invest in the country, which can include buying property.

Pritchard told Express.co.uk: “We’ve seen many more buyers from the UK take an interest in golden visas since freedom of movement was curtailed.

“Those with a golden visa can enjoy unrestricted access to Spain for as many days per year as they wish, just as they did prior to Brexit.”





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‘Very different!’ Expats in Spain share one custom that takes getting used to | Travel News | Travel


Many British expats say they think they have a better quality of life in Spain than they do in the UK. Around 300,000 Britons live in Spain with most settling in the popular areas of Costa del Sol and Costa Blanca.

British people will need to apply for Spanish residency to settle in Spain which needs to be done from the UK.

While resettling in Spain guarantees good weather and excellent Mediterranean cuisine, some customs take a bit of getting used to.

Expats who took the HSBC Expat Explorer survey reported that one Spanish custom was “very different” to home.

One said: “Get ready for a very different schedule for meals, travel as much as you can around the country, and try local dishes – it’s really fun.”

READ MORE: Spain fights to extend 90 day rule for Britons

Spanish mealtimes follow a very different schedule to eating patterns in the UK, which has taken some expats by surprise.

While breakfast tends to be eaten between 7-9am, Spaniards prefer a late lunch and don’t sit down to the midday meal until around 2-3.30pm.

British expats who enjoy an early dinner will need to adapt to Spanish customs as dinner doesn’t start until at least 9pm in Spain.

Even children might not eat until 11pm as Spanish people enjoy warmer evenings than the UK and may even take an afternoon siesta due to boiling afternoon temperatures.

DON’T MISS

Another expat’s top tip for potential British expats was to stay positive despite all the paperwork.

They said: “Be positive, don’t let the bureaucratic systems get you down, don’t try and do everything at once.”

While it’s all worth it to get that dream lifestyle abroad, expats will need to do a lot of paperwork when they first move to Spain.

However there are many solicitors who will be able to help British expats navigate any complicated procedures.

Expats in Spain also had another important piece of advice for any potential British expats looking to move.

One said: “Learn the language! Spanish for Spain generally, but if you are moving to an autonomous region like Catalonia, Basque Country or Galicia, try to learn the local language as well.”

Another expat also recommended that British people should learn Spanish before moving to Spain.

The popular expat areas of Costa Blanca and Costa del Sol will have English speaking services but it’s a good idea to understand some Spanish before settling in the country.





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Spain tourism aims to be back to pre-COVID level by 2022


Tourism in Spain to be back to pre-COVID level by 2022

While most nations across the country, including India, are trying to recover their tourism industries, there is good news coming from Spain. As per the data shared by
the
National Statistics Office (NSO), the number of international travellers visiting Spain quadrupled in September as compared to the last year, reaching 4.7 million.

It is expected, with the current numbers in place, that Spain will be back to its pre-COVID number of foreign travellers by 2022, led by the spike recorded this September. Spain’s Tourism Minister Reyes Moroto also stated that,”These data confirm a reactivation of international tourism is underway and that in 2022 we could recover pre-pandemic levels.”

Tourism in Spain to be back to pre-COVID level by 2022

It has to be noted that around 80% of Spain’s population has been vaccinated, making it a relatively safer destination to visit as well safeguarding its citizens as well. Also, Spain does not require a COVID-19 negative certificate or a vaccination proof for its public places. The country has tourism as one of its major industries and had a staggering 8.8 million visitors in 2019, right before COVID hit the world.

Spain is hailed as the second most visited country by tourists in the world, and lures with its many attractions, including architectural marvels, scenic beach escapes, unending parties, unique traditions as well as the treasure of nature that it covets. With tourism now on the rise in the country, it might just be the silver lining that the travel industry around the world has been waiting for.





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Spain Is Now the Safest EU Destination: Here’s What You Should Know Before You Travel There


The latest update of maps by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) has shown that Spain is currently the safest European Union destination to travel to amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Based on the figures that have been published by ECDC, the majority of Spain’s territory is coloured green, which makes the country a safe destination for those who want to travel there during the autumn and winter breaks, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

Currently, all of the following regions of Spain are placed on the green list:

  • Galicia
  • Asturias
  • Cantabria
  • Basque Country
  • La Rioja
  • Castile and Leon
  • Extremadura
  • Andalusia

Such categorisation has been made since all of the above-mentioned regions have identified less than 50 COVID-19 infection cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the last couple of weeks and have had a test positivity rate of not more than four per cent.

As for the other regions, they are all placed on the orange list since they have registered slightly higher numbers of Coronavirus infection cases. Nonetheless, they still remain safe for travel.

Taking into account that almost the whole territory of Spain has managed to keep low infection rates, travel to and from the country is not discouraged, especially for those who have already been vaccinated or recovered from the virus.

However, it is highly advised that everyone checks the country’s entry rules before planning a trip in order to avoid any inconvenience.

Spain has its own categorisation of countries based on their risk, which is updated every week. Currently, the majority of EU countries/regions are part of Spain’s high-risk list, including Germany, Austria, Belgium, Greece, Cyprus, Croatia, Slovenia, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Denmark, among others.

In last week’s update, the Spanish authorities announced that the entry rules have been tightened for Greece, Denmark, Czechia, Liechtenstein, and several other EU regions.

In line with the current rules that Spain has, travellers who reach the country are required to present a valid EU Digital COVID-19 Pass or another equivalent document.

More precisely, they need to show a vaccination certificate indicating that the holder has been immunised with one of the vaccines that Spain recognises for travel or a recovery certificate indicating that the holder has recovered from the virus during the last six months.

>> Which COVID-19 Vaccines Are Approved for Travel to Spain

Those who are unable to present a vaccination or recovery certificate can provide a negative COVID-19 test result taken recently in order to be permitted entry to the country.

Except for the requirements mentioned above, travellers are also required to fill in a Health Control Form, which can be completed and signed electronically.

Previously, Spain’s Association of Airlines revealed that the country expects to register increased numbers of flights during the upcoming months. The figures are anticipated to surpass the number of flights registered during the same period in 2019.



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Spain travel advice: Latest foreign office update – check your passports | Travel News | Travel









Spain travel advice: Latest foreign office update – check your passports | Travel News | Travel – ToysMatrix


























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Eindhoven University’s solar-powered camper arrives in southern Spain


Photo: Bart van Overbeeke, Solar Team Eindhoven

The world’s first fully self-sufficient ‘house on wheels’ – designed and developed by students from Eindhoven University of Technology – has completed its 2,500 kilometre journey to Tarifa, the southernmost tip of Spain.

The solar powered camper, named the Stella Vita, set off from Eindhoven on September 19, and took in embassies, parliaments and universities in Brussels, Paris and Madrid on its way.

‘We believe the transition to a sustainable future can and must be done faster,’ said Kjell Revenberg, who is the manager of the Solar Team Eindhoven. ‘We are five to 10 years ahead of the industry to show what is technically possible. During our trip, we tried to inspire as many people as possible.’

The vehicle, which can travel 730 kilometres without a charging station, has additional solar panels which can be unfolded when the roof is up, doubling the surface area to 17.5 square metres.

The camper itself is designed for two passengers with a kitchen, bed, shower and toilet all powered by sun.

Technical problems hampered the project at the start of the trip and the car was transported by trailer in the early stages. Half way through France the problems were solved and the Stella Vita completed almost 2,000 kilometres on public roads.

The Eindhoven solar team previously developed a family car and have won the World Solar Challenge in Australia four times with it.

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Three eastern European countries deemed ‘very high’ risk for travel, but Spain now less risky


By Marnie Hunter, CNN

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Romania and Belarus were deemed “very high” risk travel destinations on Tuesday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean also moved into the “Level 4: Very high level of Covid-19” category on the agency’s regularly updated list of travel advisories.

People should avoid traveling to locations designated with a “Level 4” notice, the CDC recommends. Anyone who must travel should be fully vaccinated first, the agency advises. Nearly 90 destinations are now listed as Level 4.

All the destinations that moved to Level 4 this week were previously listed as “Level 3: Covid-19 High.” The Level 3 category applies to destinations that have had between 100 and 500 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days.

These are the destinations added to Level 4 on October 12:

• Belarus
• Bosnia and Herzegovina
• Romania
• Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

New Level 3 locations

Six destinations moved to Level 3 on October 12:

• Gabon
• South Korea
• Spain
• Czech Republic
• Faroe Islands
• Uganda

Spain’s situation improved, according to CDC criteria, moving down from Level 4. The other five locations — Gabon, South Korea, Czech Republic, the Faroe Islands and Uganda — moved up from Level 2.

Destinations carrying the “Level 2: Covid-19 Moderate” designation have seen 50 to 99 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days.

In “Level 1: Covid-19 Low” destinations, fewer than 50 new cases per 100,000 residents have been logged over the past 28 days.

You can view the CDC’s risk levels for global destinations on its travel recommendations page.

In its broader travel guidance, the CDC has recommended avoiding all international travel until you are fully vaccinated.

“Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread Covid-19. However, international travel poses additional risks, and even fully vaccinated travelers might be at increased risk for getting and possibly spreading some Covid-19 variants,” the agency said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Top image: The deserted “Old Bridge” of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina is seen from an empty restaurant terrace on May 8, 2020. (Photo by Elvis Barukcic/AFP via Getty Images)



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Three eastern European countries deemed ‘very high’ risk for travel, but Spain now less risky


By Marnie Hunter, CNN

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Romania and Belarus were deemed “very high” risk travel destinations on Tuesday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean also moved into the “Level 4: Very high level of Covid-19” category on the agency’s regularly updated list of travel advisories.

People should avoid traveling to locations designated with a “Level 4” notice, the CDC recommends. Anyone who must travel should be fully vaccinated first, the agency advises. Nearly 90 destinations are now listed as Level 4.

All the destinations that moved to Level 4 this week were previously listed as “Level 3: Covid-19 High.” The Level 3 category applies to destinations that have had between 100 and 500 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days.

These are the destinations added to Level 4 on October 12:

• Belarus
• Bosnia and Herzegovina
• Romania
• Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

New Level 3 locations

Six destinations moved to Level 3 on October 12:

• Gabon
• South Korea
• Spain
• Czech Republic
• Faroe Islands
• Uganda

Spain’s situation improved, according to CDC criteria, moving down from Level 4. The other five locations — Gabon, South Korea, Czech Republic, the Faroe Islands and Uganda — moved up from Level 2.

Destinations carrying the “Level 2: Covid-19 Moderate” designation have seen 50 to 99 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days.

In “Level 1: Covid-19 Low” destinations, fewer than 50 new cases per 100,000 residents have been logged over the past 28 days.

You can view the CDC’s risk levels for global destinations on its travel recommendations page.

In its broader travel guidance, the CDC has recommended avoiding all international travel until you are fully vaccinated.

“Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread Covid-19. However, international travel poses additional risks, and even fully vaccinated travelers might be at increased risk for getting and possibly spreading some Covid-19 variants,” the agency said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Top image: The abandoned Imperial Baths at Baile Herculane, southwestern Romania, in 2018. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images)



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