7 Small French Towns That Could Star In A Hallmark Movie


In North America, Hallmark movies have become part of the Christmas tradition, a celebratory viewing of feel-good movies together with the whole family while snuggled on the couch, with Christmas decorations surrounding you. But what about those of us who want to travel over the holiday season, but would still like that warm feel-good feeling that small, Christmassy towns give you in the films?

If you find yourself in France, fret not, there are plenty of small, friendly towns and villages that give you that Christmas cheer and charm. I have selected some of my favorite places that give you a warm fuzzy feeling, with a quaintness that makes your heart soar, and doubly so around Christmas time.

Here are some not to be missed.

Amazing house near the small picturesque waterfall in Moret-sur-Loing.
Kiev.Victor / Shutterstock.com

1. Moret-sur-Loing

Picture yourself walking through medieval city gates, across an ancient bridge, looking down to an old watermill sitting in the middle of the river. Nearby are restaurants looking out over the river, and a main street decorated with pretty lights. Moret-sur-Loing lies on the perimeter of the Fontainebleau Forest and is picture perfect. If you ever wanted to send a Hallmark postcard from France, the view from the bridge at Moret-sur-Loing would certainly be on the front. Not surprising that the painter Sisley was inspired by the town, and you can follow in his footsteps on a private walking tour hitting all the scenic spots. 

Pro Tip: While walking along the Loing River will occupy you for a while, this is a small, if hugely quaint town, so why not combine it with nearby, and also rather pretty, but a bit more lively Fontainebleau?

Exterior of La Petite France, Strasbourg.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

2. La Petite France, Strasbourg

Strasbourg is well known for its Christmas cheer, but when it comes to Hallmark movie-perfect settings, head straight to the old quarter by the river. La Petite France was, in the Middle Ages, the home of the tanners, because of its proximity to the river Ill. In those days, I am sure it was not a desirable place to be, with the tightly huddled houses, narrow lanes, tiny squares, and those smells. Today, Petite France is not just a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but at Christmastime, it is still the same as centuries ago, but much improved. Tightly packed half-timbered buildings, all a little crooked, tiny squares filled with huts and stalls and twinkling trees, and the smells lingering in the air are that of mulled wine, hot chocolate, sausages with sauerkraut, and plenty of sweet things. The river is now clean and gurgling through locks and a double-decker 17th-century dam. Add covered bridges, and the cutest houses on little peninsulas right in the river, and you have probably found the most Hallmark movie spot in France. I would never suggest that you don’t look at the whole of Strasbourg, it is so lovely, but La Petite France is where you could easily imagine a film crew capturing the utter prettiness and charm of this quarter. And, you have a good chance of it snowing at Christmas.

Pro Tip: To really soak up the romance of Petite France, stay at the Hotel & Spa Regent Petite France located in a 17th-century former watermill, and you will be right in the movie.

Produce and fruit stand in St-Germain-en-Laye.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

3. Saint-Germain-en-Laye

Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a community just across the Seine from Paris. Perched high on a hill, with Paris stretching out below, not only are the views movie-appropriate but so is the small town. The marketplace of St-Germain-en-Laye is filled with a gorgeous selection of fresh food and produce stalls every Tuesday, Friday, and Sunday, and together with the narrow, cobbled streets that lead out to a grand castle and those views across Paris, are reason enough to love this community. But add the Christmas sparkle and the Christmas Village which has the backdrop of the chateau, and it gets very picturesque indeed. This is the place many choose to live in preference to central Paris, mostly because of the community, charm, and quaintness, all within a 20-minute RER A train ride of Paris.

Pro Tip: Sit with coffee and a croissant on the terrace of Café de l’Industrie, at the back of the market square, and watch the hustle and bustle, and you will see why this community is included. Everybody knows everybody else, stopping to chat, and then go about their daily business, and you can just imagine a Hallmark plot taking place here.

4. The Saint-Louis Quarter, Versailles

Versailles is beautiful at Christmas, but for that extra touch of charm, away from the rather grandiose palace, head to the Saint-Louis Quarter. Here you find no imposing grandeur, nor rugged medieval history, but the superbly quaint and charming “Carrés Saint-Louis.” A village within the small town of Versailles, so very different from the rest of the town. There are squares hemmed by tiny buildings, the ground floor usually housing an individual boutique, an art gallery, an artisan workshop, or a small café, and on the floor above, former living accommodations. All painted in beautiful colors, and too cute for words, these little buildings cover a few blocks. They surround picturesque squares where children play and old people sit and chat and were constructed under Louis XV as accommodation for a new market, still perfectly retaining their unique charm that would be a perfect setting for a Hallmark movie.

Pro Tip: Stay within Saint-Louis so as to not lose that Christmassy feeling and sleep in the small and utterly romantic Hotel Berry.

exterior of Dijon.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

5. Dijon

Dijon has so many cutesy corners, crooked half-timbered houses, and small historic spots, that it is always a delight. But at Christmastime, all these special little corners are lit up, filled with market stalls, and turn into a Christmas wonderland. Especially the corner of Place Francois Rude, nearly too charming for words.

Place Darcy and Rue de la Liberté contain around 60 chalets selling beautiful arts and crafts and offering the best of Dijon’s famous cuisine, which is even better when sampled in winter. Who can beat a warming beef bourguignon? For that little bit of an extra special treat at Christmas, head to the truffle market held in the market hall.

The pretty market hall, designed by Monsieur Gustave Eiffel of tower fame, is one of the most iconic would-be Hallmark movie locations, with families doing their seasonal shopping, people meeting friends at the various stands over a glass of wine, and everything twinkling with pretty lights.

Pro Tip: For that old-world charm, stay at the Maison Philippe le Bon, which is a lovely hotel in the center, which has kept the old features of the house and enhanced them with modern touches. The restaurant is superb, too.

Reims Christmas decorations.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

6. Reims

The capital of France’s Champagne region comes into its best at Christmas, with a Christmas market huddled around the ancient cathedral where France’s kings were crowned. Ignoring the rest of the city, however lovely and historic, and just strolling through the market, with its miniature train, Christmas trees everywhere, chalets full of mulled wine and warming food, and stalls of pretty Christmas decorations hand-crafted in the region, gets that warm fuzzy feeling going pretty quickly. Families are walking hand-in-hand, enjoying the miniature fairground and the large snow globe where Santa resides, and Christmas cheer is everywhere. What makes Reims stand out when it comes to potentially starring in a Hallmark movie, are the small champagne outlets that pop up throughout the market. Cozy little corners where you are provided with a warm blanket and a flute of champagne, and you can just visualize someone meeting up with the (future) love of their life.

Pro Tip: For a lovely, cozy meal after walking around the city, pop into the romantic L’Alambic for dinner.

The Place du Tertre with tables of cafe and the Sacre-Coeur in the morning, quarter Montmartre in Paris.
France kavalenkava / Shutterstock.com

7. Montmartre, Paris

Ask anybody, and most people will say that Montmartre is their favorite neighborhood in Paris. And the reason? Because it is a perfectly preserved village within a large city. Perched on the hill Butte Montmartre, it not only offers great views but is distinctly different and separate from the rest of Paris. At Christmas time, this village is prettier than ever. Even the carousel, which always stands at the bottom of the steep steps up to Sacre Coeur, looks prettier at Christmas if that is possible. But twinkling lights, stalls, and decorations enhance every feature of this neighborhood and if you cannot imagine a romantic girl-find-boy movie set right on Place du Tertre, the one with all the artists exhibiting their wares, then you don’t have a romantic bone in your body. On Place des Abbesses, the one with the gorgeous metro stop, a Christmas market takes over the square, and you can wander from there past the small shops and cafes and find yourself in movieland — quite literally, because this is where Amelie was filmed.Pro Tip: To soak up the atmosphere and run your own film edits in your head while watching life go on at Place du Tertre, sit in La Mer Catherine, one of the oldest restaurants in Montmartre, dating to 1793.

Visiting France at Christmas offers opportunities for other activities:



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TikTok star Jesús Morales gives away $1,000 tips to street vendors


During Hispanic Heritage Month, TODAY is sharing the community’s history, pain, joy and pride. We are highlighting Hispanic trailblazers and rising voices. TODAY will be publishing personal essays, stories, videos and specials throughout the month of September and October. For more, head here.

Feeling unfulfilled with his content, 24-year-old social media star, Jesús Morales, known as @juixxe online, turned to TikTok last summer looking for inspiration. That’s when he came across other users on the platform raising money from their followers to give out generous tips to food service workers during the pandemic.

“I remember just sitting there thinking, ‘Wow, I wish I could do that, but I want to do it for street vendors and I want to give them thousands of dollars,'” Morales told TODAY Food. “That would be so amazing.'”

Jesús Morales, aka @juixxe on TikTok, poses with street food carts.Leo Gonzalez

A year later, Morales has been able to raise $135,000 to support over 90 street vendors in Southern California thanks to the generosity of his 1.3 million followers on TikTok. Now, he hopes other people will take inspiration from his work and support their local vendors however they can.

Taking $100 out of his own pocket, Morales began filming his donation videos in August 2020 by handing the tip to a local street vendor in San Diego and recording his reaction. The vendor was in complete shock and fell to his knees and thanked him. “In that moment, (with) the way he reacted, I just knew I wanted to do it over and over again,” Morales said. From there, he started driving around San Diego in search of more vendors to support.

Morales recalls how his family taught him the power of giving from an early age. His parents, who immigrated to the U.S. from San Luis Potosí, Mexico, took service and auto industry jobs with the goal of working their way up and achieving the American dream. Despite the hardships, Morales remembers how his family still managed to visit their homeland every year and bring boxes of unused clothes and other items to those in need.

“They always had someone they could give things to,” Morales explains. “So and so could use this, so and so could use that. I think that’s where the inspiration (to give) came from.”

As the views on his tip videos began to rise, the more and more people began to donate directly to Morales though the Venmo and CashApp linked in his social media bios. Gradually, $100 tips turned into $200, then $500 and eventually the donations snowballed into the $1,000 the tips are today.

Morales then realized he could support more people in Los Angeles where street vendors are more common. Now, he typically takes trips to LA, driving around different neighborhoods to see who he can tip. His followers will often leave comments on his videos suggesting locations or specific vendors he should visit, and while Morales tries his best to help where he can, he still prefers to tip vendors at random. Often, this means that he never sees the same vendor twice.

“It’s just, you’re a stranger, I’m a stranger and we meet each other in this moment,” Morales explained.

But one instance that particularly stuck with him was with a fruit vender he noticed on the side of a busy street one evening. Morales got out of his car, ordered something and handed him the donation. Filled with gratitude, the vendor grabbed Morales’ shoulder, bowed his head and began praying.

Jesús Morales poses with one of the 90+ food vendors he’s been able to support through crowdfunding on TikTok.Courtesy Jesús Morales

“It was just a timeless moment I just had to soak in. Those words he was saying were just so powerful,” said Morales. “He was praying for me and my family and everyone who contributed. (They were) words I’ll never forget.”

But, Morales explained, not all reactions are the same. He still encounters vendors that are skeptical about why they’re receiving such a large tip, which is why he takes the time to explain how the money is crowdfunded online from supportive strangers.

“It goes to show how humble and hardworking street vendors are and it speaks volumes about the Latino and Hispanic community,” Morales said.

Transparency is one of the main reasons he believes that his initiative has become so successful. People can see the money being physically handed to someone and their immediate reactions in his videos. But above all, the safety and dignity of the person who receives the tip is his main priority. That’s why Morales never shows the vendors’ faces. He explains that most people don’t understand the hardships street vendors go through, especially when experiencing theft or facing harassment from people who want to cause them harm.

“Every vendor sells with a purpose. I just want people to know that these are real lives, these are real human beings who are just trying to make an honest living,” he added. “If you can leave a tip, $2, $3, anything, it helps. At the end of the day, you’re supporting a hardworking individual that may be working to support their family or (pay off) bills.”

Morales dreams to one day travel across the U.S. handing out donations in different cities. But at the moment, he is taking the process of receiving and handing out donations day by day.

“Who knows (what will happen),” he continued. “This just started about a year ago and I am incredibly blessed and thankful that we’ve received so much support to this day. I can only imagine what we can do in another year.”

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Disney’s Immersive Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser Resort Opening In 2022


Star Wars fans have been anxiously awaiting the opening of the Galactic Starcruiser hotel at Walt Disney World, which promises to take them on a journey to a galaxy far, far away.

Unfortunately, that dream got a little further away this week. Originally planned for a 2021 opening, Disney quietly changed the opening to 2022 this week. No specific date for the opening was announced. Nor were reasons for the delay.

The hotel will aim to duplicate the experience of a cruise as guests take part in a two-night stay labeled as “storyliving.”

Guests will “travel the galaxy in style aboard the glamorous Halcyon starcruiser, known for its impeccable service and exotic destinations,” Disney said in a release. “They will stay in well-appointed cabins, experience exquisite dining and out-of-this-world entertainment.”

Galactic Starcruiser room mockup.
David Roark / Disney

Guests will interact with characters, crew, and other passengers as they become part of the action, and their choices will determine the adventures they experience.

“Decisions guests make will determine how their individual stories unfold as they seize control of their destinies, and potentially impact the fate of the galaxy,” the Disney release said.

Once checked in and aboard the starcruiser, guests will have an array of experiences in front of them. They will:

  • Interact with Star Wars characters, the ship captain, heroes of the Resistance, and more.
  • Learn about the lightsaber, train to use it, and put their training to the test by facing off against others.
  • Visit the Bridge to learn about its systems and how to operate them.
  • Eat in the Crown of Corellia Dining Room, where breakfast and lunch will be served daily, and dinner will include a multi-course menu.
  • Take in live entertainment during dinner, including a performance from an unnamed galactic superstar.
  • Visit Batuu, where guests will explore the winding pathways of Black Spire Outpost to seek out a hidden Resistance base.
  • In their cabins, each guest will have a view of the galaxy beyond.

Despite the delay in opening, Disney has begun its search for employees to be part of the starcruiser experience and is actively advertising for actors, stunt performers, musicians, servers, and other members of the ship’s crew.

Planning a Disney vacation? See all our Disney coverage here, plus our writers’ tips for enjoying your time in Orlando.



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Traveling to Kauai here at the start of the post-pandemic – Pasadena Star News


I was going to call it journalistic research on travel in the late pandemic, and proof that since we’re distance-working, I might as well be doing it from a beach 2,600 miles from home.

But that sounds a little phony-baloney, even if it’s true enough. For almost three weeks now I haven’t been on vacation, but I haven’t been in Southern California, either.

I mean, have laptop, will travel. And my wife and I have a place we can stay for free that is — I do regret having to tell you this, if the place where you are is too hot, or too cold, or just the same old, same old that all of us have been living in for almost 14 months now — a couple of steps from the water on the North Shore of Kauai.

The WiFi works fine. The white noise blowing in the sliding glass doors from the lanai 24 hours a day to the desk where I type is the lovely combined cacophony of breaking waves in the Pacific Ocean near Hanalei Bay and the trade winds that pretty much never stop, here on the northernmost point of the Hawaiian Islands.

Since the 50th state doesn’t do Daylight Saving, the time is three hours earlier. The newsroom is already humming by the time I stumble out the door to take my daily photograph of the sunrise over the ocean. But I try to brew the coffee and catch up on editing and writing before it gets too late in the California day, and my boss has been most accommodating about it.

I mean, I can join the Zoom meeting with Gavin Newsom’s water people about the coming drought in the West quite easily from here. When I point the camera out the window of this little place — an artist friend once painted it for us, titling his work  “A View with A Room” — toward the supernaturally green cliffs towering above, sure, there might be some howls of envy from Sacramento. Not to mention that, water-wise, I am sitting about two miles as the crow flies from the wettest place on Earth, Mount Waialeale, which sees 444 inches of rain a year. We Californians would love to pirate just a few of those inches.

And, yes, when I post a pic on Instagram of  swaying trees, ripe with papayas, sighted on a tropical hike, a Southern California writer friend says in the comments section: “Stop this or invite me. Aloha for now.”

But it has actually been an interesting experiment in the COVID-19 travel world. Kauai, in addition to being an island, is also a county, and its government has exercised a New Zealand-like lockdown stronger than all the other islands over the last year. First it was a two-week strict quarantine for all arriving travelers — entirely confined to quarters. Then 10 days. Then three days. As soon as it flipped to a simple negative coronavirus test before boarding your flight, with no quarantine at all, we jumped on a plane.

Of course we would never have done so without being fully vaccinated. But, oddly, the Garden Island cares not about your vaccine status, although in coming months all of Hawaii is working toward accepting some kind of vaccine passport. Masking up is still a common courtesy, and required in the grocery store. The restaurants we eat in tend to be outdoorsy and breezy, and the masks go down pretty quickly. While walking on the beach? Everyone knows wearing a mask there is silly.

But Kauai’s isolation has worked. There have been a grand total of 199 cases of COVID-19 here. While locals are surely a little wary of the sudden haole invasion after the year of solitude, they know we were tested in order to get here, and that most older Americans are already fully vaccinated.

It’s been great, putting a toe in the waters of the way we will travel — and work from far away — in a warier future. A pure pleasure to be your aloha canary in a coal mine. And mahalo to our islander friends for welcoming us back.

Larry Wilson is on the Southern California News Group editorial board. [email protected] 



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Traveling to Kauai here at the start of the post-pandemic – Pasadena Star News


I was going to call it journalistic research on travel in the late pandemic, and proof that since we’re distance-working, I might as well be doing it from a beach 2,600 miles from home.

But that sounds a little phony-baloney, even if it’s true enough. For almost three weeks now I haven’t been on vacation, but I haven’t been in Southern California, either.

I mean, have laptop, will travel. And my wife and I have a place we can stay for free that is — I do regret having to tell you this, if the place where you are is too hot, or too cold, or just the same old, same old that all of us have been living in for almost 14 months now — a couple of steps from the water on the North Shore of Kauai.

The WiFi works fine. The white noise blowing in the sliding glass doors from the lanai 24 hours a day to the desk where I type is the lovely combined cacophony of breaking waves in the Pacific Ocean near Hanalei Bay and the trade winds that pretty much never stop, here on the northernmost point of the Hawaiian Islands.

Since the 50th state doesn’t do Daylight Saving, the time is three hours earlier. The newsroom is already humming by the time I stumble out the door to take my daily photograph of the sunrise over the ocean. But I try to brew the coffee and catch up on editing and writing before it gets too late in the California day, and my boss has been most accommodating about it.

I mean, I can join the Zoom meeting with Gavin Newsom’s water people about the coming drought in the West quite easily from here. When I point the camera out the window of this little place — an artist friend once painted it for us, titling his work  “A View with A Room” — toward the supernaturally green cliffs towering above, sure, there might be some howls of envy from Sacramento. Not to mention that, water-wise, I am sitting about two miles as the crow flies from the wettest place on Earth, Mount Waialeale, which sees 444 inches of rain a year. We Californians would love to pirate just a few of those inches.

And, yes, when I post a pic on Instagram of  swaying trees, ripe with papayas, sighted on a tropical hike, a Southern California writer friend says in the comments section: “Stop this or invite me. Aloha for now.”

But it has actually been an interesting experiment in the COVID-19 travel world. Kauai, in addition to being an island, is also a county, and its government has exercised a New Zealand-like lockdown stronger than all the other islands over the last year. First it was a two-week strict quarantine for all arriving travelers — entirely confined to quarters. Then 10 days. Then three days. As soon as it flipped to a simple negative coronavirus test before boarding your flight, with no quarantine at all, we jumped on a plane.

Of course we would never have done so without being fully vaccinated. But, oddly, the Garden Island cares not about your vaccine status, although in coming months all of Hawaii is working toward accepting some kind of vaccine passport. Masking up is still a common courtesy, and required in the grocery store. The restaurants we eat in tend to be outdoorsy and breezy, and the masks go down pretty quickly. While walking on the beach? Everyone knows wearing a mask there is silly.

But Kauai’s isolation has worked. There have been a grand total of 199 cases of COVID-19 here. While locals are surely a little wary of the sudden haole invasion after the year of solitude, they know we were tested in order to get here, and that most older Americans are already fully vaccinated.

It’s been great, putting a toe in the waters of the way we will travel — and work from far away — in a warier future. A pure pleasure to be your aloha canary in a coal mine. And mahalo to our islander friends for welcoming us back.

Larry Wilson is on the Southern California News Group editorial board. [email protected] 



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No. 13 Mountaineers tip off Lone Star State road trip with rematch at No. 12 Texas


West Virginia men’s hoops is heading to snowy Texas for a trio of games in the Lone Star State — and it all gets started in Austin as they shoot for redemption against the 12th-ranked Longhorns. The contest gets started at 3 p.m. ET on ABC.

After taking on Texas (13-5, 7-4 Big 12), the No. 13 Mountaineers head to Fort Worth on Monday and Waco on Wednesday to face TCU and Baylor — the latter matchup of which has been long-awaited after multiple postponements. With three road games in six days during a historic winter storm in the state, this presents a unique challenge that could be unprecedented for the Mountaineers.

“It’s a little bit reminiscent I think of us taking the bus to Buffalo because we couldn’t fly in a few years ago in the NCAA Tournament,” said coach Bob Huggins.

With a lot of concerns surrounding this trip, the Mountaineers start this trip in the state’s capital with revenge on their mind. WVU first clashed with then-No. 4 Texas in Morgantown on Jan. 9, with the Longhorns taking a victory in the final second to win 72-70. It was a close game, but the still-adjusting Mountaineers had a tough time stopping Texas’s inside game in the second half — with guard Andrew Jones sinking a three-pointer with a second left on the clock to go up by two.

In the time since, West Virginia has begun to hit a stride with its new roster. Texas, on the other hand, has hit some road bumps — but it doesn’t appear that coach Shaka Smart has wanted to make a lot of changes.

“I think Shaka’s got seemingly a lot more confidence in his bench,” Huggins said. “He’s playing his bench I think a lot more than at that point in time, but I think we all are.”

Smart has mostly maintained the same starting five of Jones, Courtney Ramey, Jericho Sims, Greg Brown and Matt Coleman III, and Huggins is right that the Longhorn bench has seen an uptick in minutes through February — but the bulk of production comes from the starters.

For West Virginia, strong play from its backcourt has been a continuing trend since the New Year, and the Mountaineers have continually found their shooting stroke as they grow into their new scheme. Four Mountaineers are averaging double-digits in scoring, three of whom are guards — Miles McBride (16.2 points per game), Taz Sherman (12.6) and Sean McNeil (11.6).

McNeil had an explosive week on the stats sheet over WVU’s last two games, averaging 23.5 points, with a 58.8-percent clip from three-point range. Many of those buckets came at crucial points for his team, as they defeated Texas Tech on the road and fell in double-overtime to Oklahoma a few days later.

McNeil is just one of several guys who are finding a rhythm late in the season, and it has helped even the inside players like Derek Culver put points on the board.

“[Jalen Bridges] has been terrific,” Huggins said. “There’s another guy who can stretch the floor, he gives Derek more room to operate in the post. We can surround the line with guys who can make shots. [The three-point ball] has been a very integral part of what we do, but it’s personnel-dictated.”

WVU’s road trip opens against the Longhorns on network ABC at 2 p.m. ET.





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No. 13 Mountaineers tip off Lone Star State road trip with rematch at No. 12 Texas


West Virginia men’s hoops is heading to snowy Texas for a trio of games in the Lone Star State — and it all gets started in Austin as they shoot for redemption against the 12th-ranked Longhorns. The contest gets started at 3 p.m. ET on ABC.

After taking on Texas (13-5, 7-4 Big 12), the No. 13 Mountaineers head to Fort Worth on Monday and Waco on Wednesday to face TCU and Baylor — the latter matchup of which has been long-awaited after multiple postponements. With three road games in six days during a historic winter storm in the state, this presents a unique challenge that could be unprecedented for the Mountaineers.

“It’s a little bit reminiscent I think of us taking the bus to Buffalo because we couldn’t fly in a few years ago in the NCAA Tournament,” said coach Bob Huggins.

With a lot of concerns surrounding this trip, the Mountaineers start this trip in the state’s capital with revenge on their mind. WVU first clashed with then-No. 4 Texas in Morgantown on Jan. 9, with the Longhorns taking a victory in the final second to win 72-70. It was a close game, but the still-adjusting Mountaineers had a tough time stopping Texas’s inside game in the second half — with guard Andrew Jones sinking a three-pointer with a second left on the clock to go up by two.

In the time since, West Virginia has begun to hit a stride with its new roster. Texas, on the other hand, has hit some road bumps — but it doesn’t appear that coach Shaka Smart has wanted to make a lot of changes.

“I think Shaka’s got seemingly a lot more confidence in his bench,” Huggins said. “He’s playing his bench I think a lot more than at that point in time, but I think we all are.”

Smart has mostly maintained the same starting five of Jones, Courtney Ramey, Jericho Sims, Greg Brown and Matt Coleman III, and Huggins is right that the Longhorn bench has seen an uptick in minutes through February — but the bulk of production comes from the starters.

For West Virginia, strong play from its backcourt has been a continuing trend since the New Year, and the Mountaineers have continually found their shooting stroke as they grow into their new scheme. Four Mountaineers are averaging double-digits in scoring, three of whom are guards — Miles McBride (16.2 points per game), Taz Sherman (12.6) and Sean McNeil (11.6).

McNeil had an explosive week on the stats sheet over WVU’s last two games, averaging 23.5 points, with a 58.8-percent clip from three-point range. Many of those buckets came at crucial points for his team, as they defeated Texas Tech on the road and fell in double-overtime to Oklahoma a few days later.

McNeil is just one of several guys who are finding a rhythm late in the season, and it has helped even the inside players like Derek Culver put points on the board.

“[Jalen Bridges] has been terrific,” Huggins said. “There’s another guy who can stretch the floor, he gives Derek more room to operate in the post. We can surround the line with guys who can make shots. [The three-point ball] has been a very integral part of what we do, but it’s personnel-dictated.”

WVU’s road trip opens against the Longhorns on network ABC at 2 p.m. ET.



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Science News Roundup: There’s light-speed travel in ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Star Trek.’ Is it possible?


Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

There’s light-speed travel in ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Star Trek.’ Is it possible?

Spaceships zipping at the speed of light or faster are a staple of science fiction. Think of the Millennium Falcon in the “Star Wars” movies and the starship Enterprise in “Star Trek.” Such travel sounds like fanciful speculation. But is it? A new research paper authored by an American physicist offers a potential blueprint for superluminal travel – faster than the speed of light – using conventional physics rather than a construct based upon hypothetical particles and states of matter with exotic physical properties.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)



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