CA ranked among deadliest states


SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Summer-road-trip season is officially here, with Memorial Day weekend kicking us into a potential jump in holiday-related traffic fatalities.

With travel costs climbing higher, more people are expected to do their holiday traveling via car, as KRON4 reported yesterday. Jerry, a car insurance savings application, conducted a study to learn where and when American drivers should take extra precautions ahead of the holiday travel. Using data pulled from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on fatal crashes during the holiday weekend from 2011 through 2020.

States with the highest death tolls

The study showed that California saw the second-highest traffic fatality rate, with 358 fatalities. However Texas topped the charts with 448 fatalities over the same period. Florida came in third with 331 deaths. More than half of the fatal crashes happened between the hours of 6p.m. and 3a.m. and 39% of those involved a driver who had been drinking alcohol.

64% of the fatal traffic crashes on Memorial Day weekends over the decade involved a single vehicle. However, 56% involved a vehicle driving off of the roadway. It also appears that driving on surface streets is more dangerous than highways, as only 12% of the fatal crashes took place on interstate highways. Those percentages may seem small, but than 4,100 people died in traffic accidents over Memorial Day weekends from 2011 to 2020.

If you are planning to head out driving this weekend, take caution. It turns out that the most dangerous time to be on the roads during a Memorial Day weekend is Saturday night through Sunday morning. The three hours with the most fatalities on average are Saturday from 8-9p.m. and 10-11p.m. and Sunday morning between 2-3a.m.



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20 differences that may leave you with culture shock when moving to the United States – Columbia Spectator – CU Columbia Spectator



20 differences that may leave you with culture shock when moving to the United States – Columbia Spectator  CU Columbia Spectator



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US states could ban people from traveling for abortions, experts warn | Abortion


As abortion bans proliferate in states around the US, some state legislatures are likely to go even further than just ending abortion in their jurisdictions – taking aim at the growing numbers of people seeking procedures and medications out of state, experts warn.

If, as the bombshell leak of its private vote suggests, the supreme court weakens or overturns Roe v Wade – the 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion – in an upcoming decision on Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban, states will be left with a confusing patchwork of laws that will probably lead to legal challenges.

A fresh wave of restrictions will probably center around patients who leave their state to obtain legal abortions in other states, or who order medications to manage their abortions at home.

Lawmakers in Missouri weighed legislation early this year that would allow individuals to sue anyone helping a patient cross state lines for an abortion. The law was ultimately blocked in the state’s legislature, but experts expect such legislation to gain more support if Roe is weakened or overturned.

“I think states are not going to rest with just saying ‘there won’t be abortions in our state.’ I think they’re going to want to ban abortion for their citizens as much as they can, which would mean stopping them from traveling,” said David Cohen, professor at Drexel University’s Kline School of Law and lead author of a forthcoming article on cross-state legal issues that could arise in the abortion context.

“We’re going to see state-against-state battles that are really going to divide this country even deeper on this issue,” he said.

If the supreme court overturns abortion protections, such travel bans might also be permitted to stand, Cohen said.

“The supreme court does not have well-developed case law regarding extraterritorial application of state law,” he added in an email. A court that has gone so far as to overturn Roe, he said, “would likely take that unclear precedent in the direction that is most anti-abortion.”

But banning travel would go against “basic American principles”, he said. “You have freedom of travel in this country, and as long as you’re following the law in the state where you are, you are legally OK” under current law. For instance, adults can gamble in states where it’s legal, even if they’re from states where it’s not allowed.

If the constitutional right to abortion is reversed, more than half of states are likely to prohibit abortions, according to separate analyses by the Center for Reproductive Rights and the Guttmacher Institute.

Several states have recently passed abortion bans that would be unconstitutional under Roe, but could stand if the landmark ruling is overturned by the supreme court. Some have passed laws similar to Texas’s ban on abortions at six weeks of pregnancy – around four weeks after conception, when most people don’t know they are pregnant – while others are advancing legislation similar to the 15-week ban at the center of the supreme court case.

On Thursday, Oklahoma lawmakers passed a Texas-style ban that will take effect immediately after Governor Kevin Stitt signs it, expected to occur within days. Stitt signed another bill earlier this year that would make abortion illegal in nearly all circumstances, but that law would not take effect until August.

As state-based restrictions proliferate, traveling out of state for reproductive healthcare has become common. After the Texas law took effect last year, Planned Parenthood clinics in neighboring states saw an almost 800% increase in patients.

If Roe is weakened or overturned, “a lot of the states that are likely to lose access are surrounded by other states that are likely to lose access”, said Mikaela Smith, a research scientist at the Ohio State University’s College of Public Health and the lead author of new research on out-of-state abortion travel. That means patients may need to travel across several states to receive care.

That would also exacerbate existing inequities in healthcare, she said. “Folks who have the resources and have the financial means will be able to do the extra work to cross state lines and folks who don’t, or don’t have the connections or know how to access the care they need, just won’t be able to.”

States are also likely to crack down on other efforts to access care. In Texas, a law passed last year made it illegal to ship medication for self-managed abortion, including across state lines – another potential template for copycat legislation.

Since the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced last year that it would continue its pandemic-era policy to allow medication abortion, also known as the “abortion pill”, to be prescribed via telemedicine, the drugs have become a greater target from anti-abortion advocates. Medication abortion now accounts for the majority of abortions in the US.

“Pills are going to be a major part of how people continue to get abortions after the supreme court rules, so I think that we’ll see states trying to ban pills in all sorts of different ways,” Cohen said.

Blue states are preparing for the upcoming decision by shoring up reproductive rights for patients and protections for providers.

Soon after Idaho passed a contested Texas-style ban, neighboring Washington enacted the first law to prevent lawsuits on performing or aiding an out-of-state abortion.

Bills are progressing through the Connecticut and Illinois legislatures to protect patients traveling from out of state and the providers who care for them, and a dozen bills are moving through the California legislature to make reproductive rights stronger and more accessible.



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States Sue U.S. Over Continued Mask Mandate


Twenty-one states led by Florida this week filed a lawsuit in a U.S. district court against several U.S. agencies  to throw out the federal mask mandate that has been in effect in airports, on airplanes and on all public transportation since January 2021, when the Biden administration implemented the mandate as an official federal regulation. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently extended the mask mandate on airlines and public transportation, which was set to expire on March 18. The new expiration date is set for April 18, and the new lawsuit may pressure the administration to let the mandate expire.

The suit, filed in the Tampa Division of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida, claims overreach by the CDC, the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services as well as the Transportation Security Administration, alleging the agencies have relied on prior narrow statutes to impose “economy-wide mask requirements … at transportation hubs and while traveling on non-private conveyances which include aircrafts, trains, road vehicles and ships.” 

The states pointed to economic harm caused by the mandates, invoking the cruise industry and destinations that rely on that industry to support local commerce as an example. 

According to data firm Statista, major cruise lines’ full-year 2021 revenue remained close to 90 percent below 2019 levels, even after the CDC allowed a six-month no-sail order to expire in October 2020 and defined a path to begin cruising again in 2021 with a mask mandate in place. The CDC allowed federal masking requirements for cruise ships to expire on Jan. 15 this year, and cruise lines individually began to ease their own masking rules in March. 

The lawsuit leaned into the terminology of “economy-wide mandates” to characterize the ongoing mask mandate on airlines and public transportation and cited the Supreme Court ruling in a suit brought in August 2021 regarding the CDC’s moratorium on evictions to support its characterization. It also pointed to recent carveouts like public school buses, for which the CDC lifted masking requirements in February. Attorneys for the plaintiffs also emphasized potential effects of masking on small children, including widely debunked claims like “reduced oxygenation.”

It’s unlikely that the ongoing masking mandate for airlines alone has impeded the industry’s recovery. TSA checkpoint numbers in recent months are within 10 percent to 15 percent of 2019 volumes and occasionally have surpassed 2019 volumes on specific days. That said, airlines, which individually imposed masking requirements for crews and passengers starting in May 2020, now are imploring the Biden administration to allow the mask mandates to expire on April 18. 

strongly worded letter signed by multiple airline CEOs states the mandates have outlived their usefulness. The letter goes further, however, in also pushing the administration to ease Covid-19 testing requirements for international travelers, citing recent changes in the U.K. and the European Union to lift Covid-19 travel restrictions.



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Missouri wants to stop out-of-state abortions. Other states could follow.


Republican state Rep. Mary Elizabeth Coleman, who is pushing the Missouri policy as an amendment to multiple health bills, said it specifically targets a Planned Parenthood clinic in Illinois just across the river from St. Louis that opened in 2019 with the explicit goal of serving Missouri patients.

“If you believe as I do that every person deserves dignity and respect and protection whether they’re born or unborn, then of course you want to protect your citizens, no matter where they are,” Coleman told POLITICO. “If a Missouri resident is hurt, even in Illinois, by a product that they bought in Illinois, there is still jurisdiction for them to sue in a Missouri court because that’s home for them … and this is extending that same kind of thought to abortion jurisprudence.”

Her effort puts Missouri at the vanguard of a new round of action in state capitals where conservatives are rushing to enact legislation ahead of an anticipated Supreme Court ruling that sharply limits or overturns Roe v. Wade.

The Missouri proposal is on the legislative calendar, meaning it could be voted on any time before the session ends in May. The legislation goes further than most abortion restrictions advancing across the country, and attempts to evade legal challenges by adopting the same private enforcement mechanism as Texas’ six-week abortion ban, which the Supreme Court has allowed to stay in place for the last six months. Both policies allow a judge to award at least $10,000 in damages if the suit is successful.

Legal scholars say the Missouri proposal opens a Pandora’s box that could force courts to contend with questions that date to the Fugitive Slave Act two centuries ago.

“There’s no clear precedent saying that states can’t try to regulate out-of-state conduct if it has some effect in-state or if it [involves] one of their citizens,” said David Cohen, a professor of law at Drexel University’s Kline School of Law and co-author of a forthcoming paper in the Columbia Law Review on impending interstate conflicts in abortion law. “What these laws are doing is saying, ‘We have a different understanding of how America works, and that understanding is that if you live in this state, we control you everywhere you are.’”

Missouri’s move comes as a growing number of people seek abortions outside their home states, and as abortion-rights groups raise money to help low-income patients pay for travel and lodging. That trend, most evident in Texas, is expected to surge if the Supreme Court upholds a Mississippi law prohibiting abortion at 15 weeks. Should that happen, up to half of the states are expected to limit or ban abortion almost immediately, further fraying the current national patchwork of access.

Other states are likely to explore their own version of the Missouri amendment if it becomes law and withstands anticipated legal challenges.

Chelsey Youman, the state director and national legislative adviser for the anti-abortion–rights advocacy group Human Coalition Action in Texas, is working with the same lawmakers who drafted the state’s six-week ban to craft a Missouri-like bill that could be introduced when lawmakers return to Austin next year.

“We’ve had the benefit of seeing for six months now what an almost abortion-free state could look like,” she said. “But we know women are still going out of state, or worse, illegally obtaining medical abortion pills. The Missouri model would essentially close those loopholes.”

According to James Bopp Jr., the general counsel for National Right to Life, there is some legal precedent for such policies: several federal and state laws already prohibit the transportation of minors across state lines for an abortion without parental consent. But Missouri’s attempt to extend that to adults, he noted, is “completely novel.”

Abortion pills — which recently became the most popular method of terminating a pregnancy in the U.S. — are also a target of conservative lawmakers looking to police abortion across state lines.

Several states including Texas have moved to crack down on the practice of prescribing the drugs via telemedicine and sending them by mail to people’s homes. Many others are looking to implement similar bans in the wake of the Biden administration’s move earlier this year to loosen restrictions on the pills. Coleman’s proposal in Missouri also includes such a prohibition.

The anti-abortion-rights activists and elected officials favoring the policies argue they can’t achieve their goal of eliminating all abortion without deterring travel across state lines, and say they are responding to progressive advocates who are raising money to help people terminate a pregnancy in another state.

“You have a very aggressive industry working on helping people circumvent pro-life laws,” said Kristi Hamrick with Students for Life of America, which has chapters lobbying for restrictions in all 50 states. “So the conversation in Missouri and other locations is in direct response to that.”

These new policies, while perhaps difficult to enforce, create a chilling effect, said Andrew Beck, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project.

“It encourages people to spy on and rat out their neighbors and friends and family members,” he said.

The conservative effort has also led legislators in Democrat-controlled states to draft countermeasures aimed at protecting in-state physicians who provide abortions and those who help people cross state lines. These measures also provide legal protections to the pregnant person, though Coleman’s proposal doesn’t allow the patient to be sued.

In California, lawmakers have proposed a suite of bills, including one, which passed out of its first committee on Tuesday, that would protect Californians from the kinds of civil lawsuits contemplated by Missouri.

“We don’t believe that any other states should have the right or ability to reach into our state and enforce a judgment or control the actions of our citizens or physicians,” said Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan, the bill’s sponsor.

A bill in Washington state awaiting Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee’s signature aims to legally shield anyone — including out-of-state residents — who has an abortion or helps someone obtain one. And lawmakers in Oregon just approved $15 million in their budget to cover abortion fees, travel and lodging expenses for state residents and travelers alike, and expand the number of abortion providers in the state.

These moves come as many expect a wave of patients from Idaho, which this week became the first state to follow Texas’ lead in passing a ban on abortion after 6 weeks of pregnancy.

Progressive advocates also want the Biden administration to put out guidance explicitly stating that the right to interstate travel is protected by the Constitution, and they want federal health agencies to strengthen HIPAA protections so people’s medical records can’t be seized and used as evidence in a lawsuit.

Abortion-rights supporters stress, however, that even these kinds of state and federal protections would only be a partial solution should more states follow Missouri’s lead.

“Not everyone can fly to California or travel across state lines,” Beck said. “It doesn’t help a whole slew of people in Missouri who need this care: people of color, people who are undocumented, people who are young, people who live in rural areas, people with disabilities.”



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Citigroup to pay for workers’ abortion travel in Texas, other states with restrictive laws


Citigroup Inc. is starting to cover travel costs for employees seeking abortion after several states, including Texas, implemented or proposed a near-total ban on abortions.

“In response to changes in reproductive health-care laws in certain states in the U.S., beginning in 2022 we provide travel benefits to facilitate access to adequate resources,” the bank wrote in a filing for its shareholders meeting set for April 26.

The policy will cover expenses, such as airfare and lodging, that employees may incur if they’re forced to travel to receive an abortion, according to a person with knowledge of the matter.

In Texas, where Citigroup has more than 8,500 employees, Gov. Greg Abbott signed legislation last year that banned abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur as early as six weeks. Under the law, individuals can sue doctors, clinic workers and others who help a woman end an unwanted pregnancy past the cutoff date. Texas and some other states have also sought to restrict medication-induced abortions.

Citigroup, led by Chief Executive Officer Jane Fraser, already has spent years in the Lone Star State’s crosshairs. The New York-based bank is seeking to revive its underwriting business in Texas after a law barred local governments from working with companies that discriminate against firearm entities prompted the firm to suspend its municipal-debt underwriting there for several months.

The bank follows companies including Match Group Inc. in responding to Texas’s near-total abortion ban. Match CEO Shar Dubey, whose Dallas-based company owns some of the biggest dating apps, said last year she was creating a fund to help cover the costs for employees and dependents who need to seek care outside the state. Lyft Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc. pledged to pay legal fees for drivers sued under the Texas law.

Match Group competitor Bumble, led by Southern Methodist University graduate and founder Whitney Wolfe Herd, created a similar fund. In the S&P 500, just 31 companies have female CEOs.

But not all firms helping workers deal with the new laws are led by women: Medical insurance provided by another index member, Apple Inc., which has a large presence in Austin, covers travel expenses for out-of-state abortions, CEO Tim Cook has told employees.

Davia Temin, founder of New York-based crisis consultancy Temin and Co. and a Citigroup executive in the 1980s, said other politically progressive banks may follow the financial giant’s lead.

“Good for Citi. Under Jane Fraser they really are making great strides in equity, pay and otherwise,” Temin said. “Their decision just announced puts their female employees first, over the political wrangling of the day. They listened. Employees don’t forget that, they won’t forget that and they shouldn’t forget that.”

Citigroup’s so-called proxy filing, posted after market hours on Tuesday, also provided an update on hiring and developments in compensation.

The bank ended the year with more than 223,000 workers around the world. The company enlisted 47,000 new employees in 2021, and filled an additional 27,000 roles through internal hiring, meaning nearly one-third of its staffers are new to the organization or to their jobs, Citigroup said.

In the U.S., the banking giant said it made some progress toward closing the racial pay gap in 2021. Minorities made 4% less than non-minorities did in 2021, an improvement from 6% a year earlier.

Still, on a global basis, median pay for women was 26% less than for men, a disparity similar to a year earlier.

Citigroup remains one of the few major companies to disclose its unadjusted pay gap. Instead, many of its competitors offer an adjusted look that takes into account an employee’s role and location. On that basis, women globally are paid on average more than 99% of what men are paid at Citigroup.

“Gender parity is something we demonstrate from the very top of our organization,” Citigroup said in the so-called proxy filing. “Eight of our 15 members of the board of directors are women and three are ethnic minorities. Jane Fraser is our first female CEO — and is the first woman to lead a major U.S. financial institution.”



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16 States Removed From Chicago Travel Advisory Ahead of Busy Spring Break – NBC Chicago


Sixteen states were dropped from Chicago’s travel advisory Tuesday, bringing the city’s warning list down to 18 states and one territory as spring break travel begins.

The city’s health department announcedArizona, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming had all dropped below the threshold to be on the travel warning list.

An additional eight states could be dropped next week if they remain below the threshold.

States are added to the advisory’s “orange list” when COVID metrics rise above the threshold of 15 cases per day per 100,000 people. Any below that mark are on the “yellow” list, with public health officials still warning against non-essential travel.

The latest change comes amid declining COVID metrics following the omicron surge this year, and one day after the city and Illinois lifted mask and vaccine mandates.

“It’s great that as daily COVID-19 case rates keep falling throughout the U.S., people are more comfortable and confident making spring and summer travel plans,” Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady. “But more than half of the country is still on our Travel Advisory, and for unvaccinated travelers that means they should continue to adhere to the quarantine and testing guidelines.” 

Just before the Labor Day holiday last year, the city updated its guidance for what unvaccinated travelers visiting or returning from locations on the advisory should do, adding new testing and quarantining recommendations before and after travel.

The city noted that “given the delay for approval of vaccination for children under 5,” children 5 years old and younger are exempt from the advisory, but only if the adults they are traveling with are vaccinated.

International travelers will be subject to guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, which requires that all travelers, regardless of vaccination status or citizenship, get a negative COVID-19 viral test no more than one day before travel into the United States.  

Under Chicago’s guidelines, unvaccinated individuals should do the following before travel:

  • Get tested 3-5 days prior to departure.

While traveling:

  • ALL individuals regardless of vaccination status should wear a mask on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and while indoors at U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.
  • In Chicago, wear a mask in all indoor public settings, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Avoid crowds, try to stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who is not traveling with you, and wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).

 After travel, unvaccinated individuals should:

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days.
  • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
  • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

The city advised all travelers to monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms and isolate and get tested if they develop any after travel.

This week’s update to the travel advisory comes at a time when the average daily number of new cases in Chicago is down to 132, a stark difference from the 5,189 seen earlier this year.

That figure is still higher than the low of 34 the city saw in late June last year, however.

Hospitalizations are averaging 9.43 per day and deaths dropped to 1.57 per day, both marking significant decreases from the omicron peak earlier this year.

The positivity rate in testing dropped to 0.7%, a dramatic decline from the 21% seen during the surge.

The travel advisory is updated every Tuesday, with any changes taking effect the following Friday.



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Chicago removes 16 more states from COVID-19 travel advisory


For the fourth straight week, Chicago has removed states and territories from its weekly COVID-19 travel advisory.

As cases continue to decline across the country, 16 states were removed from the list: Arizona, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming. 

The city said that an additional eight states could be removed from the advisory next week if daily case rates remained below 15 per 100,000 residents.

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In order to be removed from the city’s travel advisory, a state or territory’s daily case rate must remain below 15 for two consecutive weeks.

Since last week, the daily case rate for the U.S. dropped from 12.7 to 10.3. Illinois’ daily cases rate fell from 11.8 last week to 9.6 and Chicago’s dropped from 7.1 to 4.9, according to the Chicago Department of Public Health.

Chicago’s top doctor, CDPH Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady, stressed caution even as cases decline. 

“For the first time in months there are now more states not on our COVID-19 Travel Advisory than there are on it,” Arwady said in a statement. “But that doesn’t mean COVID-19 has gone away or that it still doesn’t pose a risk to anyone, especially the unvaccinated. COVID-19 is still around, and too many Chicagoans remain unprotected, especially in communities that have borne the brunt of the outbreak.”

City health officials encouraged unvaccinated residents who plan to travel to following advisory guidance and get tested for COVID-19 before and after travel from any state on the list and quarantine upon arrival in Chicago.



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12 States Removed From Chicago Travel Advisory as List Drops to 34 States, 1 Territory – NBC Chicago


Twelve states were dropped from Chicago’s travel advisory Tuesday, bringing the city’s warning list down to 34 states and one territory.

The city’s health department announced Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Wisconsin had all dropped below the threshold to be on the travel warning list.

An additional 18 states could be dropped next week if they remain below the threshold.

States are added to the advisory’s “orange list” when COVID metrics rise above the threshold of 15 cases per day per 100,000 people. Any below that mark are on the “yellow” list, with public health officials still warning against non-essential travel.

The latest change comes amid declining COVID metrics following the omicron surge this year, and one day after the city and Illinois lifted mask and vaccine mandates.

“It’s great that as daily COVID-19 case rates keep falling throughout the U.S., people are more comfortable and confident making spring and summer travel plans,” Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady. “But more than half of the country is still on our Travel Advisory, and for unvaccinated travelers that means they should continue to adhere to the quarantine and testing guidelines.” 

Just before the Labor Day holiday last year, the city updated its guidance for what unvaccinated travelers visiting or returning from locations on the advisory should do, adding new testing and quarantining recommendations before and after travel.

The city noted that “given the delay for approval of vaccination for children under 5,” children 5 years old and younger are exempt from the advisory, but only if the adults they are traveling with are vaccinated.

International travelers will be subject to guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, which requires that all travelers, regardless of vaccination status or citizenship, get a negative COVID-19 viral test no more than one day before travel into the United States.  

Under Chicago’s guidelines, unvaccinated individuals should do the following before travel:

  • Get tested 3-5 days prior to departure.

While traveling:

  • ALL individuals regardless of vaccination status should wear a mask on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and while indoors at U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.
  • In Chicago, wear a mask in all indoor public settings, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Avoid crowds, try to stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who is not traveling with you, and wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).

 After travel, unvaccinated individuals should:

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days.
  • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
  • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

The city advised all travelers to monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms and isolate and get tested if they develop any after travel.

This week’s update to the travel advisory comes at a time when the average daily number of new cases in Chicago is down to 191, a stark difference from the 5,189 seen earlier this year.

That figure is still higher than the low of 34 the city saw in late June last year, however.

Hospitalizations are averaging 16 per day and deaths dropped to 3.14 per day, both marking significant decreases from the omicron peak earlier this year.

The positivity rate in testing dropped to 0.8%, a dramatic decline from the 21% seen during the surge.

The travel advisory is updated every Tuesday, with any changes taking effect the following Friday.



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States begin starting Tuesday night | News, Sports, Jobs



From Mirror reports

The Portage boys and girls will play a doubleheader at Mount Aloysius on Wednesday in the first round of the PIAA playoffs.

The local District 6 champions, the girls in 1A and the boys in 2A, are the only area teams playing at the same location as the state playoffs begin Tuesday and Wednesday. The girls will start by taking on WPIAL fifth-place finisher West Greene at 6 p.m., and the boys — who made it to the PIAA semifinals last year — will take on WPIAL fifth-place finisher Sto-Rox at 7:30.

There will be seven teams from the Mirror’s core coverage area in action on Tuesday.

District 6 Class 1A boys champion Bishop Carroll will host District 9 fourth-place finisher North Clarion at 7 p.m., but no other area teams will be playing in their home gym that night.

The District 6 1A boys runner-up Williamsburg will play District 9 third-place finisher Otto-Eldred at Hollidaysburg at 6 p.m. District 6 Class 4A champion Penn Cambria will also stay close to home at Central Cambria High School against WPIAL fifth-place finisher Deer Lakes at 7, and the Northern Bedford girls will return to the site of their District 5 Class 2A championship win when they play WPIAL fifth-place finisher Shenango at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown at 6 p.m.

Three area teams have long road trips on Tuesday.

The Bellwood-Antis girls, third-place finishers in District 6 2A, travel to WPIAL runner-up Our Lady of Sacred Heart for a 7 p.m. tip. The Penn Cambria girls, District 6 Class 3A fourth-place finishers, will be playing at North Catholic, the WPIAL champion, at the same time.

The Central boys, the District 6 Class 4A runner-up, will travel to Midland to take on Lincoln Park, the WPIAL third-place finisher.

On Wednesday, there are eight games for the Mirror’s core area, including the Portage doubleheader.

The Tyrone and Hollidaysburg girls and Bishop Guilfoyle boys will play on their home courts. The District 5-6 4A champion Lady Eagles will host WPIAL fourth-place finisher Southmoreland at 7 p.m., and the Marauders, the District 6 Class 3A runner-up will host District 10 third-place team Girard. Hollidaysburg will host WPIAL fifth-place finisher Latrobe at 7 p.m.

The Williamsburg girls, the District 6 Class 1A runner-up, will take on District 9 fourth-place finisher Ridgway at Claysburg-Kimmel at 7 p.m.

Two teams will be making long trips.

The Cambria Heights boys, who finished third in District 6 Class 3A, will take on Avonworth, the WPIAL runner-up, at North Allegheny in Wexford at 7:30 p.m. The Bishop Carroll girls, the District 6 Class 1A third-place finisher, will travel to Otto-Eldred for a 6 p.m. game.

All of Tuesday’s winners will play in the second round on Friday, and Wednesday’s winners will play Saturday.



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