BBB Tip: Travel safely on your vacation | Community


Thinking about traveling by air for a long weekend or during a holiday break? Think about what is and isn’t required when it comes to masks and vaccinations. As restrictions change from one state to another, so are rules for traveling. When looking for the best fare available, read the details required by the carrier to travel safely and review CDC guidelines for both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Before clicking the button to buy tickets, BBB recommends the following:

• Make certain everyone who is traveling has the appropriate ID. The new deadline for REAL ID enforcement is May 3, 2023; however, make sure parties traveling together have a current compliant ID as required by each state.

• Read all cancellation polices carefully. Not all situations, including a pandemic, require a full refund of the ticket value and fees. Each online travel agency, airline and broker is different.

• Book tickets only after reviewing travel restrictions. Save time and stress by reading the updated status of restrictions on the Centers for Disease Control website.

• Consider trip insurance. Have a complete understanding of what the policy does and does not cover.

• Be an informed traveler. Refer to the Department of Transportation website for details on consumer issues, filing complaints and other aviation information.

Visit BBB.org/travel for more tips and resources for planning a vacation.



Source link

Ask Amy: Husband and wife seek to settle argument on whether to tip on total or before tax when dining out


Dear Amy: Two years ago (prior to the pandemic), my husband and I went on a cruise with longtime friends. They then asked us to join them again.

The date is approaching, and we are having a huge problem letting my sister know we are going. I know this is a first-world problem, but my sister is a widow and counts on us to provide her with all her socialization.

My husband has been a saint in making her a part of all our vacations, dinners out, etc., with no complaint. We have been married for 52 years and my sister has been widowed for 20 years.

She is always complaining of how she is bored and feels no one does anything to provide her with “things to do,” or asking her to be part of vacations, dinner parties, etc.

We are at a loss on how to tell her we are leaving without her on this trip.

She is wealthy, we are not, but she has no one to go with her on adventures.

Past experiences when this has happened have been incredibly unpleasant. She becomes very depressed and will go for weeks without speaking to us.

It makes us feel guilty for going without her, but we also believe we are entitled to have our own life. There are many past familial issues with my mother who was mentally ill, leading to feelings of abandonment and guilt.

Is there any way we can tell her we are leaving for nine days without her feeling left out and abandoned?

We have considered offering to go with her on a trip of her choosing at Christmas, but we don’t know how to approach the situation.

It is causing me (and my husband) much anxiety.

I actually vomit due to anxiety over this.

What can we do?

– Guilty

Dear Guilty: Your sister is something of an emotional vampire, and your generosity toward her over the last 20 years has enabled her to control you to the extent that you and your husband have already determined that you won’t be able to enjoy a wonderful vacation without her.

That’s how powerful and successful her training has been!

If you had established some reasonable boundaries years ago, your sister might have her own life by now.

There are many wonderful opportunities for guided travel available to solo travelers with the means and motivation.

If you don’t have the backbone to tolerate your sister’s tantrum, then you should just give in, stay home, and devote yourselves to her needs.

However, you might liberate yourselves from this control if you prepare yourselves for her reaction and simply choose not to be triggered by it this time.

You say, “We’re leaving for a cruise at the end of the month and will be gone for nine days. We’re pretty excited and looking forward to it, and we’ll see you when we return.”

Do not offer her alternate vacations in order to appease her. That is just reinforcing behavior which you are seeking to change.

Dear Amy: My husband and I always have this disagreement whenever we go out for a meal.

Do you base your tip on the total amount (like I do) or before the tax (like my husband)? Please settle this for me!

– Big tipper in NJ

Dear Tipper: Strictly speaking, if you tip on the total (including tax), then part of your tip is actually based on the tax itself – not on services rendered.

However, I base my tip on the total, and then add some.

I do this because I once waited tables.

Also, because I can.

The U.S. Department of Labor publishes a table of minimum wages for tipped employees (which vary by state). Ask your husband to take a look at this chart (search on DOL.gov) and ask if shaving a few pennies off of a tip from these truly minimal hourly minimums is really worth it to him.

Dear Amy: I was disappointed by your response to “Tired.” This letter was written by a mom who didn’t like it when her adult children kept bouncing back home for long or short stays.

You should have suggested that she give them jobs to do! At the very least, each visiting child should pay for/prepare one meal for the family.

– Never an Empty Nest

Dear Never: I did suggest that “Tired” should set up some boundaries in terms of cooking and cleaning, but yes – giving them specific jobs would be better.

(You can email Amy Dickinson at [email protected] or send a letter to Ask Amy, P.O. Box 194, Freeville, NY 13068. You can also follow her on Twitter @askingamy or Facebook.)

©2021 Amy Dickinson. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.





Source link

Make the most of your Verizon iPhone with this easy money-saving tip!


In 2021, Verizon’s consumer revenues topped $23 billion, increasing 7.3 percent year on year. Today, Verizon is the largest wireless telecommunications provider in the United States, serving over 120 million subscribers. Despite boasting breathtakingly larger customer numbers, Verizon continues to grow, expanding its offering an reaching an increasingly larger audience. None of this growth would be possible though, were it not for the overwhelming growth in smartphone demand. This insatiable demand creates a landscape well-suited to industry giants able to capitalise on increasing demand for the latest devices.

Surprisingly, the first smartphone was invented in 1992, only 29 years ago. IBM released the Simon Personal Communication, truly a revolution in consumer telecommunications. It was the first telephone to combine the functions of a cell phone and a PDA. Cell phones were still in their infancy, primarily there were used for calls. The Simon even accepted pages. Though its battery lasted only one hour, this early smartphone cost in excess of $1000. Irrespective, IBM sold over 50,000 Simons in the first six months. Though this might not seem like much in the context of today’s sales, then it was astronomical.

In 1999, Blackberry joined the smartphone bandwagon. Technically, this was the company’s first portable email device, not a smartphone. The firms first foray into the smartphone industry came in 2002, pioneering the full QWERTY keyboard—soon to be replaced with touch screens. The smartphone industry was revolutionised in 2007 when Steve Jobs released the first iPhone. Costing only £470, the first iPhone did not have 3G capability. Despite this, Apple sold 6 million devices. In 2008, Apple unveiled the App store, experiencing more than 10m downloads across the first weekend. In the first quarter of 2016, 17.2 billion applications were downloaded.

In 2008 the first Android phone was released. Today, Android is the dominant operating system in the smartphone market, serving over 2 billion active users monthly. The first Android device was the HTC Dream, it had a sliding keyboard, a multi-touch screen, 3G and a three-megapixel camera. According to Statista, the number of smartphone users has exceeded 2.7 billion, more than 35% of the global population. One wonders when this figure will surpass 50%.

This insatiable demand sees consumers upgrading their devices more frequently than ever before. Given devices remain relatively expensive, the majority of these new devices are purchased on contract plans with major carriers like Verizon. Verizon offers customers the opportunity to purchase a device and spread the cost over many months. These devices are locked to Verizon and cannot be used with any other provider. Whether you want to continue using your device in a more cost-effective fashion, or sell it to raise a little pocket money, there’s a secret all Verizon customers with locked devices need to know.

The savvy consumer secret hidden in plain sight …

The telecommunications industry has changed. The best available airtime and data packages are available through small SIM-only providers, not large airtime providers. However, locked devices exclude these competitive providers, meaning consumers are stuck with pricy contract packages from large carriers. This lack of flexibility translates to a lower sale value in the open market. Prospective buyers are willing to pay more for unlocked devices, knowing they are more flexible and offer a more cost-effective solution. SIM-only packages often offer unlimited data and airtime for £20-30 less per month. A sizeable amount of money in the context of a yearly requirement.

The cost-saving doesn’t end here. Travelling is more common than ever. Whether for business or pleasure, people travel frequently. When locked in a contract, smartphone users are subject to expensive roaming chargers. These are charges imposed by networks when using devices abroad. Unlocked devices are free from these charges. Travellers can simply find a local store and choose from any domestic SIM-only provider. Once they plug this SIM into their phone, they’re able to use their device and applications as they do at home, staying in touch with family and friends. This is a great option even when in a contract.

Getting your device unlocked used to be a serious pain, but services like DirectUnlocks have made this process super simple.If you want to find out how to Unlock Verizon iPhone then all you need to do is visit DirectUnlocks. All that is required is your device IMEI. Once you enter your IMEI into the website, DirectUnlocks can unlock your device remotely, often within just 6 hours without you needing to even leave your home. So, if you have a Verizon device, make the most of it with this simple trick!



Source link

Preview: MSU men’s hoops to tip off Battle 4 Atlantis


After winning three straight, Michigan State men’s basketball is set to take on Loyola Chicago in the first game of the Battle 4 Atlantis at Paradise Island, Bahamas. 

The Battle 4 Atlantis, an early-season staple since it’s inception in 2011, boasts another loaded field this year: reigning national champion Baylor, Arizona State, Syracuse, Auburn, VCU, Loyola Chicago and Michigan State. Making his first appearance in Atlantis, Head Coach Tom Izzo lauded the strength of his competitors and said he’s excited for this opportunity with his team.

“Anytime you can travel together and spend time together and do some things together…it’s always a positive,” he said. 

Now, after weathering what Izzo called a “brutal” start to the season, Michigan State is now in for their most demanding test so far. Izzo said the challenge of a condensed schedule with little turnaround time provides nearly invaluable preparation for further conference play and the NCAA Tournament. 

“Three games in three days is very difficult on a coaching staff but it’s even more difficult for the players,” Izzo said on Tuesday. “What we can pick up for this…you won’t be able to measure it. It’s really going to help you later on, win, lose or draw.” 

Scouting Loyola 

Michigan State tips off on Wednesday against Loyola Chicago (4-0), one of the established top mid-major programs in the country. There’s a noteworthy connection at hand here, too: the Ramblers are coached by first-year Head Coach Drew Valentine, a Lansing native and former Michigan State graduate manager who worked under Izzo from 2013 to 2015. 

Izzo said he doesn’t like to play former assistants but is proud of Valentine for reaching this stage of his career as the youngest head coach in Division I college basketball. Regardless, he indicated that their relationship won’t detract from the competition at hand. 

“I just pull for these guys to win every game except the one I’m playing in,” he said.

As for Valentine’s squad, Izzo called them the “oldest team in captivity” and cited experience as their greatest asset. Loyola returns four starters from a 2020-21 campaign that saw them post a 26-5 record and advance to the Sweet Sixteen, with graduate student guard Lucas Williamson (10.8 points per game) and graduate student forward Aher Uguak (13.5 points per game) leading the way in their final seasons in Rogers Park. 

For as much as they return, Loyola added one crucial piece that’s played a big role thus far. Princeton transfer and senior forward Ryan Schweiger joined the Ramblers this offseason and leads the team in scoring (14.8 points per game) while only averaging 18 minutes per game. 

Valentine has also instituted some changes among the Ramblers, namely a higher emphasis on shooting from the arc. Loyola has the fourth best three point shooting percentage (45.2%) in all of college basketball with Schweiger (50%) and Williamson (38.1%) leading the way (minimum ten attempts on the season). 

For the most part, Michigan State’s defense has been strong this season but if they have one weakness, it’s giving up a disproportionate amount of threes. Izzo said it’s crucial they defend the shot better than they did in their most recent outing against Eastern Michigan to have success against a Ramblers team that packs a balanced punch.

On the rest of the field 

Baylor (4-0) lost two key contributors in Davion Mitchell and Jared Butler to the NBA Draft but returned more than enough talent to still be true contenders in a strong Big 12. Senior guard Matthew Mayer and junior guard Adam Flagler are back as the stalwarts of a team that won it all with ferocious defense and a lightning rod offense that thrived on the perimeter but sophomore guard L.J. Cryer (18.5 points per game) and freshman guard Kendall Brown have more than come into their own in the early going. The Bears aren’t just leaning on a championship pedigree to be considered consummate favorites in the Battle 4 Atlantis; they’ve got the talent, coach and scheme to make a serious run at it. 

Arizona State (2-2) is one of the more puzzling teams in this year’s field. Senior forward Kimani Lawrence (16 points per game, 10 rebounds per game) is thriving once again but narrow losses to San Diego State and UC Riverside are cause for some valid concerns in Tempe. Expect the Sun Devils to lean on their seasoned frontcourt of Lawrence and junior forward Jalen Graham this week as they continue to piece together a cohesive backcourt with only Ohio State transfer and redshirt junior guard Luther Muhammed firmly in the mix. 

UConn (4-0) is one of the trendier picks to finish second to Villanova in a red-hot Big East and this tournament will provide them with their first taste of high major competition. However unproven they might be, it’s a near certainty that sophomore forward Adama Sanogo (15.8 points per game) will draw much of the opposition’s attention with his dangerous combination of size and strength after taking a big step forward this offseason. The Huskies also boast four other double digit scorers in graduate student guard R.J. Cole, senior guard Tyrese Martin, graduate student forward Tyler Polley and junior guard Jalen Gaffney all while playing tenacious defense and rebounding extremely well; if they can rectify their recent problems with slow starts, UConn could be in it for the long haul on Paradise Island. 

After last year’s disappointing season, Auburn (3-0) wisely bolstered their frontcourt with freshman forward Jabari Smith and North Carolina transfer and sophomore center Walker Kessler. Kessler’s offensive output hasn’t been outstanding so far but Smith (13.3 points per game, 8.7 rebounds per game) has shined as a key contributor early in his college career and is well on his way to earning further NBA buzz. Sophomore guards K.D. Johnson and Wendell Green Jr. also chip in a combined 26.3 points per game as just the tip of the iceberg on a Tigers team that will look to lean on their considerable depth this week. 

Syracuse (2-1) recently suffered one of the worst losses of any team this season with a shocking 100-85 loss to Colgate, a team they haven’t lost to since 1962. Anomaly? The Orange will find out this week as they ride some veteran scoring talent with headlining senior guard Buddy Boeheim (20 points per game), junior guard Joseph Girard III, graduate student forward Jimmy Boeheim and senior forward Cole Swider. And while they’ve been markedly better on offense than defense to start the year, nobody knows not to count out their vaunted 2-3 zone better than Izzo. 

“Anytime Syracuse is here with (Head Coach Jim Boeheim) with that zone, there’s going to be problems there,” Izzo said. 

Do you want the news without having to hunt for it?
Sign up for our morning s’newsletter. It’s everything your friends are talking about and then some. And it’s free!

On the surface, VCU (2-2) might be the clear-cut weakest team of the bunch after posting some putrid results, particularly a 48-37 win over Vanderbilt and 58-44 loss to Wagner. There’s not as much to like here when compared to the other teams in Atlantis but this defense is no joke and senior forward Vince Williams Jr. (12.3 points per game) looks to be more than up for the challenge provided on Paradise Island. 

Michigan State tips off against Loyola Chicago at 12 p.m. The game will be broadcast on ESPN. 

Discussion

Share and discuss “Preview: MSU men’s hoops to tip off Battle 4 Atlantis” on social media.



Source link

Laura Whitmore shares her biggest exercise tip: ‘Always pack trainers’


The presenter is a huge fan of exercises you can incorporate into your day (Picture: Dare 2b)

Laura Whitmore is a presenter, best known for hosting Love Island on ITV 2.

She began her career as a video jockey at MTV and went on to present the reality show Survival Of The Fittest on ITV 2.

Away from broadcasting Laura is an author and model.

Her first book, No One Can Change Your Life Except You, was published in March and this month she launched her own autumn/winter sportswear collection in conjunction with Dare 2b, the leading sports brand.

What are your favourite exercises?

I love yoga and exercise that I can incorporate into my day such as walking the dog and running for a train.

Normally, I always have a pair of trainers in my bag because I travel a lot, and so no matter what country I’m in I can throw them on and go for a run or walk.

I remember working in Mexico years ago, doing behind the scenes at night on a James Bond film. I didn’t have time to see the city, but I got up super-early the next day and put on my trainers for a run around it.

What are your secret vices?

Drinking rosé wine, a lot, especially during the first lockdown!

Laura’s latest fitness goal is to get back into a routine (Picture: Dare 2b)

Any unfulfilled fitness aims?

During lockdown last year, I was loving my daily walks, but as soon as lockdown was over, I stopped doing them.

My fitness aim would be to go back to basics and keep up the routines that I adopted during lockdown, just to feel good and get energy. The more active I am the more energy I have.

How did the lockdowns impact you?

They made me feel very grateful for nature and for living near a park because going for a walk or walking the dog in nature became such an integral part of my day.

How do you relax?

With a bath. I love a bath and could be in it for an hour, until I’m shrivelled like a prune!

Any mood-boosting tips?

Just getting active by going out in the fresh air for a walk or a run, can change your mood drastically. I love sticking on a pair of headphones and listening to an uplifting podcast, while running or walking.

I do that especially if I’m getting stressed at work. Just removing myself from work, revives me.

Keeping active helps Laura cope with stress (Picture: Dare 2b)

How has your working life contributed to a healthier you?

My working life has not necessarily contributed to a healthier me because when you’re freelance you can end up working 24 hours a day and so it’s good to take a break. In fact, it’s important to take a break for the sake of your health.

What sportswear do you like to exercise in?

I like practical sportswear that you can layer up and mix and match, that is comfortable, and makes you feel good. [It’s for this reason that] I love Dare 2b.

You can layer everything from the sports bras to the vests and the fleeces to the gilets. Probably one of my favourite Dare 2b pieces are the rain macs because they’re so light and the hooded little jerseys ‘cos they’re great for layering.

Sometimes I feel like wearing all black [sportswear], but other times it’s nice to have a pop of colour to brighten my mood,

Do you have a story to share?

Get in touch by emailing [email protected].


MORE : Food as fuel: How to know if you’re eating enough for your exercise regime


MORE : How to use exercise to help you sleep better


MORE : How your genes influence which type of exercise works for you



How to get your Metro newspaper fix

Metro newspaper is still available for you to pick up every weekday morning or you can download our app for all your favourite news, features, puzzles… and the exclusive evening edition!

Download the Metro newspaper app for free on App Store and Google Play





Source link

Taking the Trip of a Lifetime With Bruce Poon Tip



By channeling tourism dollars back into the communities being visited, G Adventures founder Bruce Poon Tip has not only created a better way to travel, but he also has built a circular economic system that benefits underserved communities all over the world.


Photo courtesy of G Adventures

Companies, along with the people who run them, the products they make and the faces who represent them, need to stand for something good. Otherwise, the critical, woke millennials won’t work for you or consume your products—and they sure won’t be shy about shaming you on the socials. In other words, nowadays corporate values need to align with consumer values if a company is to succeed. Or so the prevailing wisdom goes.

Of course, the prevailing wisdom of our times was not a popular theory in 1990, when a young Bruce Poon Tip maxed out two credit cards to launch his tour operator travel company, G Adventures in Toronto. 

But mixing passion with purpose to turn a profit is the only way Bruce knows how to work. 

He developed his winning formula early: Find a hole in the market—preferably one driven by passion and purpose—and invent an innovative way to meet the demand.

When he was one of seven children living with his immigrant family in Calgary, his love of animals led him to learn about dwarf rabbits, a Dutch breed that he suspected could satisfy a growing craze for pet bunnies and solve the disappointment pet owners felt when other rabbits grew larger and not-so-cute. Bruce found an Alberta farmer who agreed to sell him two dwarf rabbits, then convinced his parents to let him put their cages in the backyard. As the male and female did what rabbits do, he biked his way around town, introducing himself and his bunnies to pet store and drugstore managers (remember when drugstores sold pets?), forging personal relationships with his vendors—and he was in business. One of the first things he did was exhibit the rabbits at a 4-H Club show (he biked there, too), where they caused a sensation and won best in show—and let him brand his pets as “award-winning.” 

He was 12 years old. This was the second of three businesses he launched before graduating high school.

Bruce learned the importance of purpose-driven selling at 14 during his third entrepreneurial endeavor: a bookmark business. He was selling student-made bookmarks at the drugstores where the managers already knew him, but the business didn’t take off until he changed the story, adding purpose and meaning with new marketing. “If you buy these, you are helping students,” he added to the displays. The bookmarks started flying off the counters.

Less than a decade later at 22, his passion was travel, and the hole in the market was the wide gap that existed between the two prevailing modes of travel at the time: mainstream travel, where guests were cosseted at Western-style, all-inclusive resorts and shielded from the local community, and backpacking, which required a lot of DIY resourcefulness and a willingness to rough it. There had to be a better way, he thought. One where travelers could interact in meaningful ways with locals to get a true flavor of a destination, where transportation—by canoe, tuk-tuk, local trains—could be an interesting part of the journey, and where the tourism dollars spent wouldn’t end up in a corporate office across the globe but rather would remain within the local community, helping to sustain and develop it. And that’s what he created with G Adventures.

For his first trip, he took six people to Ecuador. For his second, six more to Belize. Why these destinations? In practical terms, they were close to Canada. In travel terms, they offered variety—mountains, the Amazon, the Galapagos. In philosophical terms, “I wanted to go where other people weren’t going yet.”

Along the way, he developed relationships with locals, who agreed to welcome G Adventure travelers. In return, the revenue they received went back into their communities—resulting in new schools and health centers and improved economic prospects and giving people an alternative to having to move from their villages to seek employment in cities. 

One of the first people he met in the Ecuadoran Amazon was a man called Delfin. He didn’t speak English, couldn’t understand why people would want to visit his community and had no interest in money. But Bruce is beguiling. And with a handshake, Delfin agreed to host travelers in his home and share his way of life. Three decades later, Delfin is still a partner, and proceeds from tourism have helped him build a local school, fight the government when they wanted to confiscate his land for oil and preserve his way of life and his culture. His son, who Bruce met as a newborn, recently graduated from university in Moscow. 

G Adventures has developed thousands of partnerships all over the world. “We were helping someone start a local business in order to create more business for us,” he wrote in his bestselling 2013 book, Looptail: How One Company Changed the World by Reinventing Business. “And our passengers reported high rates of satisfaction with these close-to-the-community experiences. They would rave about having the opportunity to take part in their trip, as though it was a privilege, rather than something they paid for.”

In 2003, Bruce launched a nonprofit arm of G Adventures called the Planeterra Foundation, which was designed to leverage the tourism economy to benefit underserved communities all over the world. To date, Planeterra has completed more than 100 projects all over the world, such as Oodles of Noodles, a program in Vietnam that teaches at-risk street kids how to run restaurants, a partnership with Streets International. 

Bruce is especially proud of SASANE, the nonprofit founded with a $25,000 grant from G Adventures and the Planeterra Foundation to benefit Nepalese women who are victims of human trafficking. The women learn to become paralegals and then help themselves and other women. “They help police officers identify other women who are trafficked and train the police to ask the right questions,” Bruce explains. “They help women get off the street.” G Adventures travelers to Nepal get to spend time with the women, learning about their lives during cooking classes.

In India, G travelers are picked up by Women on Wheels, a fleet driven by formerly homeless and abused women who received 18 month of training and a car through G Adventures. This in a country where women rarely drive. G trips often include a first-day city tour led by teenagers who were found in shelters and taught to be tour guides. Bruce speaks of “amazing stories of kids found at train stations when they were two or three years old. I know six of these kids who are studying through scholarships in the United States.”

Bruce doesn’t use trendy terms like ecotourism or sustainable tourism to define his work and his mission. He likes “community tourism” as a better descriptor for the circular economic system he’s created, where tourism dollars are channeled back into the communities. He’s also aware that “the world has changed in our favor. The mindset of people, the sustainability movement, the way people live at home. We have always thought for 30 years that people will match their values with their holiday time.” His gut instinct paid off. 

It all sounds almost hopelessly feel-good and kumbaya, doesn’t it? It is, but it works: Bruce leveraged those handshake agreements into a nine-figure business that has had double-digit growth for three decades. Some 200,000 travelers take more than 750 tours to 100 countries on every continent. G Adventures tours have a “G for Good” community-minded element in the trip. The pandemic took its toll, but tours have resumed in the countries where they can travel, and 2022 Looks strong. G Adventures has five headquarters around the world, in Berlin, London, Melbourne, Boston and Toronto; each has won a “best places to work” award.

Bruce’s other accolades are almost an embarrassment of riches: Social Venture Network Hall of Fame (2012), Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, EY Entrepreneur of the Year (2002, 2006, 2016), British Travel and Hospitality Hall of Fame (2018), #10 on Glassdoor’s Top CEOs list (2019).

And he’s the only person to have ever had a business book endorsed by a living god, the Dalai Lama. In the foreword to Looptail, His Holiness wrote, “Not only in his business but also in this account of his adventures, Bruce Poon Tip is making an active contribution to creating a more peaceful and happier world, while at the same time creating a model from which others can learn.”

How does he find the right balance between purpose and profits? “There’s no real way to balance it,” he says. “I can honestly say that in 30 years, I have never had to make a decision based on money. I believe that if we do everything right, we’re profitable. Profit can be organic, and we have proven that. Double-digit growth, getting the best people—it all comes if we get the community right. It’s esoteric for some people to believe, but it’s true.” 

Asked what he would advise other CEOs, he says, “Put the right things in place for people to achieve human happiness. Focus on sustained human happiness. Happy people drive performance.”





Source link

Mum shares smart time-saving tip for families at Disney theme parks


A MUM of three has shared a time-saving tip for families heading to Disney theme parks while there are still Covid restrictions.

Holidaying in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic has added an extra layer of stress for a lot of people going away.

A mum has shared a time-saving tip for families heading to Disneyland theme parks

2

A mum has shared a time-saving tip for families heading to Disneyland theme parks

But Jennifer Leigh’s easy trick gives families ‘one less thing to worry about’ while racing round the park having fun.

Jennifer recently returned from a trip to Disney World, Florida with her kids, aged seven, 10 and 12.

All three kids needed face masks as Disney has a face covering rule for everyone aged six and over.

While they are mandatory in most places, face masks can be removed in some parts of the parks, such as outdoor selfie spots, as well as for eating and drinking.

This gives kids several opportunities to lose their mask.

Jennifer has advised any parents visiting a Disney park with their kids to attach a face mask to a lanyard and hang it around their child’s neck.

Kids then have easy access to their face mask when they need it and don’t have to faff around taking it out of a pocket or bag, saving time.

It is also a lot less likely to go missing.

Reflecting on her trip, Jennifer wrote on Facebook: “Things that helped: the lanyards for the masks.

“This might be a little detail but they helped a lot.

“Instead of having to put away the mask and get the mask out again the kids just wore them around their necks all day and it was one less thing to worry about.”

Jennifer also advised parents to carry a portable phone charger, poncho and bottled water.

Last week, Disney announced that guests aged five and over on a US Disney Cruise Line must be vaccinated from January 13, 2022.

This is likely to cause problems for Brit families booked on Disney cruises in the US, as children under 12 in the UK are not currently eligible for a vaccine.

Recently, a woman whose job is to plan Disney holidays for people revealed some of the most common mistakes when visiting the parks.

They included the worst time to visit, the types of tickets people buy and the meals they opt for once inside the parks.

Jennifer advises parents visiting a Disney park to attach a face mask to a lanyard and hang it around their child's neck

2

Jennifer advises parents visiting a Disney park to attach a face mask to a lanyard and hang it around their child’s neck
Disney fan reveals hidden secret eating area in the parks without the crowds





Source link

Preview: MSU men’s hoops to tip off Battle 4 Atlantis


After winning three straight, Michigan State men’s basketball is set to take on Loyola Chicago in the first game of the Battle 4 Atlantis at Paradise Island, Bahamas. 

The Battle 4 Atlantis, an early-season staple since it’s inception in 2011, boasts another loaded field this year: reigning national champion Baylor, Arizona State, Syracuse, Auburn, VCU, Loyola Chicago and Michigan State. Making his first appearance in Atlantis, Head Coach Tom Izzo lauded the strength of his competitors and said he’s excited for this opportunity with his team.

“Anytime you can travel together and spend time together and do some things together…it’s always a positive,” he said. 

Now, after weathering what Izzo called a “brutal” start to the season, Michigan State is now in for their most demanding test so far. Izzo said the challenge of a condensed schedule with little turnaround time provides nearly invaluable preparation for further conference play and the NCAA Tournament. 

“Three games in three days is very difficult on a coaching staff but it’s even more difficult for the players,” Izzo said on Tuesday. “What we can pick up for this…you won’t be able to measure it. It’s really going to help you later on, win, lose or draw.” 

Scouting Loyola 

Michigan State tips off on Wednesday against Loyola Chicago (4-0), one of the established top mid-major programs in the country. There’s a noteworthy connection at hand here, too: the Ramblers are coached by first-year Head Coach Drew Valentine, a Lansing native and former Michigan State graduate manager who worked under Izzo from 2013 to 2015. 

Izzo said he doesn’t like to play former assistants but is proud of Valentine for reaching this stage of his career as the youngest head coach in Division I college basketball. Regardless, he indicated that their relationship won’t detract from the competition at hand. 

“I just pull for these guys to win every game except the one I’m playing in,” he said.

As for Valentine’s squad, Izzo called them the “oldest team in captivity” and cited experience as their greatest asset. Loyola returns four starters from a 2020-21 campaign that saw them post a 26-5 record and advance to the Sweet Sixteen, with graduate student guard Lucas Williamson (10.8 points per game) and graduate student forward Aher Uguak (13.5 points per game) leading the way in their final seasons in Rogers Park. 

For as much as they return, Loyola added one crucial piece that’s played a big role thus far. Princeton transfer and senior forward Ryan Schweiger joined the Ramblers this offseason and leads the team in scoring (14.8 points per game) while only averaging 18 minutes per game. 

Valentine has also instituted some changes among the Ramblers, namely a higher emphasis on shooting from the arc. Loyola has the fourth best three point shooting percentage (45.2%) in all of college basketball with Schweiger (50%) and Williamson (38.1%) leading the way (minimum ten attempts on the season). 

For the most part, Michigan State’s defense has been strong this season but if they have one weakness, it’s giving up a disproportionate amount of threes. Izzo said it’s crucial they defend the shot better than they did in their most recent outing against Eastern Michigan to have success against a Ramblers team that packs a balanced punch.

On the rest of the field 

Baylor (4-0) lost two key contributors in Davion Mitchell and Jared Butler to the NBA Draft but returned more than enough talent to still be true contenders in a strong Big 12. Senior guard Matthew Mayer and junior guard Adam Flagler are back as the stalwarts of a team that won it all with ferocious defense and a lightning rod offense that thrived on the perimeter but sophomore guard L.J. Cryer (18.5 points per game) and freshman guard Kendall Brown have more than come into their own in the early going. The Bears aren’t just leaning on a championship pedigree to be considered consummate favorites in the Battle 4 Atlantis; they’ve got the talent, coach and scheme to make a serious run at it. 

Arizona State (2-2) is one of the more puzzling teams in this year’s field. Senior forward Kimani Lawrence (16 points per game, 10 rebounds per game) is thriving once again but narrow losses to San Diego State and UC Riverside are cause for some valid concerns in Tempe. Expect the Sun Devils to lean on their seasoned frontcourt of Lawrence and junior forward Jalen Graham this week as they continue to piece together a cohesive backcourt with only Ohio State transfer and redshirt junior guard Luther Muhammed firmly in the mix. 

UConn (4-0) is one of the trendier picks to finish second to Villanova in a red-hot Big East and this tournament will provide them with their first taste of high major competition. However unproven they might be, it’s a near certainty that sophomore forward Adama Sanogo (15.8 points per game) will draw much of the opposition’s attention with his dangerous combination of size and strength after taking a big step forward this offseason. The Huskies also boast four other double digit scorers in graduate student guard R.J. Cole, senior guard Tyrese Martin, graduate student forward Tyler Polley and junior guard Jalen Gaffney all while playing tenacious defense and rebounding extremely well; if they can rectify their recent problems with slow starts, UConn could be in it for the long haul on Paradise Island. 

After last year’s disappointing season, Auburn (3-0) wisely bolstered their frontcourt with freshman forward Jabari Smith and North Carolina transfer and sophomore center Walker Kessler. Kessler’s offensive output hasn’t been outstanding so far but Smith (13.3 points per game, 8.7 rebounds per game) has shined as a key contributor early in his college career and is well on his way to earning further NBA buzz. Sophomore guards K.D. Johnson and Wendell Green Jr. also chip in a combined 26.3 points per game as just the tip of the iceberg on a Tigers team that will look to lean on their considerable depth this week. 

Syracuse (2-1) recently suffered one of the worst losses of any team this season with a shocking 100-85 loss to Colgate, a team they haven’t lost to since 1962. Anomaly? The Orange will find out this week as they ride some veteran scoring talent with headlining senior guard Buddy Boeheim (20 points per game), junior guard Joseph Girard III, graduate student forward Jimmy Boeheim and senior forward Cole Swider. And while they’ve been markedly better on offense than defense to start the year, nobody knows not to count out their vaunted 2-3 zone better than Izzo. 

“Anytime Syracuse is here with (Head Coach Jim Boeheim) with that zone, there’s going to be problems there,” Izzo said. 

Do you want the news without having to hunt for it?
Sign up for our morning s’newsletter. It’s everything your friends are talking about and then some. And it’s free!

On the surface, VCU (2-2) might be the clear-cut weakest team of the bunch after posting some putrid results, particularly a 48-37 win over Vanderbilt and 58-44 loss to Wagner. There’s not as much to like here when compared to the other teams in Atlantis but this defense is no joke and senior forward Vince Williams Jr. (12.3 points per game) looks to be more than up for the challenge provided on Paradise Island. 

Michigan State tips off against Loyola Chicago at 12 p.m. The game will be broadcast on ESPN. 

Discussion

Share and discuss “Preview: MSU men’s hoops to tip off Battle 4 Atlantis” on social media.



Source link

ROUNDUP: Lathrop, Ripon girls hoops teams tip off season with blowout wins


Lathrop’s girls basketball team shut out Elk Grove in the first and third quarters on Tuesday and rolled to a 54-12 home victory in its first game of the season.

Kierstin Constantino led the balanced Spartans with 11 points in limited action. Lathrop opened up a 19-0 lead by the end of the first quarter and stretched it out to 37-4 by halftime.

“We came out really aggressive and did well,” Lathrop coach Dwayne Davis said, noting that his team forced seven turnovers in the first period. “Everybody got some minutes and contributed. We dialed back the pressure after the first quarter. We’re excited to get the season started and we’ll get the opportunity to spread our wings next week.”

Egypt Jenkins and Navi Kaurpreet added eight points each, and Sanah Sunner contributed six. Nyla Kieu scored six for Elk Grove. The Spartans return to action next Monday against Weston Ranch for their Foundation Game and travel to El Capitan of Merced on Tuesday.

 

Ripon 50, Tokay 16

In Lodi, Ripon shook off a slow start and dominated the second half, holding the host Tigers (1-1) scoreless in the fourth quarter.

Mackenzie Loechler netted 12 of her game-high 14 points in the second half and swiped nine steals. Taylor Tobin sparked the Indians early, scoring eight of her 10 points in the second period. Ripon led 21-11 at halftime. Grace Mikami contributed eight points, and Kaylee Hutchinson scored seven to go with nine rebounds.

Tokay hit three 3-pointers for the majority of its offensive production, with Gaby Gonzalez draining two of them in the first half.

 

BOYS BASKETBALL

Pleasant Grove 65, Manteca 49

Manteca (1-2) tallied 20 points in the third quarter, but it wasn’t enough to overcome a poor start in Elk Grove. Pleasant Grove (2-0) limited the Buffs to single-digit scoring in each of the first two quarters and led 33-16 at halftime.

Ryan Inderbitzin fired 15 points to pace Manteca. Taj Mehrok chipped in 11. Six-foot-10 center Joseph Espy racked up 15 points for Pleasant Grove.

Manteca looks to bounce back in its Foundation Game at Ripon on Monday and home opener against Turlock on Tuesday.

 

Sonora 72, Ripon 52

The Indians (0-1) started their season at home and were ahead 27-26 at halftime before Sonora (2-0) took over.

Logan Gillespie and Jack Schooland scored 12 points each to lead Ripon, which faces Mt. Whitney of Visalia in the NorCal Sports Showcase in Atwater on Saturday.

 

Elk Grove 81, Weston Ranch 61

The host Thundering Herd (2-0) splashed down 11 3-pointers and got balanced scoring from Ameere Britton, Dajon Lott Jr. and Karlos Zepeda, who registered 16, 13 and 13 points, respectively.

Richard Banks led Weston Ranch (1-1) with 14 points. Khristian Holmes contributed 11, and Elijah Mobley had 10.

 

GIRLS SOCCER

Weston Ranch 2, Riverbank 2

Down two goals, the Cougars (1-1-1) countered with second-half goals from Montserrat Ruiz Perez in the 63rd minute and Yaritza Jimenez in the 73rd to come away with a draw.

Ruiz Perez notched her goal with a free kick, while Jimenez’s equalizer was set up by Sam Hernandez’s cross. Anabelle Mayorca collected five saves.

 

Ripon 4, Kimball 2

Freshman Olivia Maragos scored twice and had an assist as the Indians (2-0) dominated their first home match of the season. They outshot the Jaguars from Tracy, 14-4.

Maddie Winter contributed a goal and an assist. Katie Martin scored once, while Alyson Harvey and Ariana Daniels each had an assist. Goalkeeper Elena Gomez had two saves.

 

BOYS SOCCER

Weston Ranch 7, McNair 0

Alexis Chavez spearheaded the rout for visiting Weston Ranch (2-0), firing two goals and two assists.

Sergio Garcia, Aaron Silva and Armando Montes each pitched in a goal and an assist. Fausto Esquivel struck for a goal, and Angel Zapata converted a penalty kick. Elezar Nava added an assist to the attack.

The Cougars have a challenging stretch ahead with Tokay (at home), Franklin (home) and Johansen (away) on successive days starting next Monday.

 

JV girls basketball

Lathrop 42, Elk Grove 17

A 16-2 third-quarter burst broke it open for the Spartans, who were led by Kalani Soriano’s 14 points.

Riana Dela Cruz and Samreet Dhot contributed eight apiece.

 

JV boys basketball

Manteca 60, Pleasant Grove 31

Bryson Davis poured in 17 points to help the Buffaloes improve to 3-0.

J.J. Menor and Micah Crawford added 13 and 12, respectively.

 

Frosh boys basketball

Pleasant Grove 64, Manteca 57

Jayden Scarver registered 15 points, Elijah Middleton had 12 and Harp Mehrok 11 for the Buffaloes (2-1). 



Source link

Training Tip: A rain, a plane, a TFR, violated


It would be prudent to review the FAA’s guidance on expense sharing and to remember that expense sharing is permitted only on flights involving a “common purpose.” Join the discussion >

This discussion is from our online Pilot Information Center, where you can ask questions, contribute answers, earn badges, and join our growing pilot community online. (Log in to the online Pilot Information Center using your AOPA website username and password to see this discussion.) Did you know that student pilots who join AOPA are three times more likely to complete their flight training? Membership includes unlimited access to aviation information by phone (800-USA-AOPA, weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern time) or from AOPA Online. Have a question for our technical services staff? Contact AOPA.



Source link