Summer air travel picks up as revenge travelers ignore high prices


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  • Airlines have been taking advantage of strong consumer demand to pass on some of the additional costs of oil and inflation with higher airfares.
  • Consumers have turned away from discretionary goods, but they’re not willing to give up travel even as airfares surge.
  • But if you’re a budget-conscious traveler, there are steps you can take to get you better prices.

Summer’s heating up and so is inflation. But even with airfares soaring, people are determined to take what they see as a much-needed vacation after two years of pandemic stress. 

Air travel bookings turned sharply higher in March after the omicron wave faded and many destinations eased entry requirements, especially if you were fully vaccinated. Consumers were so eager to travel again, they did so even after oil prices rose to their highest level in about 14 years and faced the highest overall inflation in 40 years.

Fuel is the second-largest expense for airlines at around 30% of operating costs and has doubled in price from a year ago, according to the Energy Information Administration. And airlines have been taking advantage of strong consumer demand to pass on some of those additional costs with higher airfares.

“My coach ticket from Chicago to Phoenix was $1,300, which is over three times the usual fare,” said Tom Blew, who took his trip last month to visit family and friends. “I guess pent-up demand isn’t price-sensitive, and there are very few options unless you want to fly in the middle of the night.”

Travel: No longer optional but a necessity 

Consumers have recently turned away from discretionary goods amid surging inflation to afford everyday necessities like groceries and rent, but there are no signs they’re willing to give up travel even as airfares surge. In April, airline tickets jumped by 8.6 %, the largest one-month increase since the Bureau of Labor Statistics started tracking this in 1963.

In the first three months of this year, travel spending exceeded spending on general merchandise (think stuff you can buy on Amazon), which is tapering off. In March, consumers spent $1,290 on average for travel compared with $819 on general merchandise, data from wealth management firm Personal Capital showed. 

“In March, we saw what’s possible, with surging demand brought on by reduced infection rates, relaxed restrictions and tremendous pent-up demand for people to travel,” said Robert Isom, chief executive officer at American Airlines in its earnings conference call. “Demand is as strong as we’ve ever seen it.”  

Delta’s President Glen Hauenstein agreed, saying in an April earnings call profit margins are looking good “as fuel prices have continued to run up and demand continues to remain strong.”

That’s because people want to spend time with family and friends, a Deloitte survey of 4,233 Americans fielded March 23-30 showed. That desire is likely to boost travel above both 2021 and pre-pandemic levels, with six in 10 Americans planning trips, up from 50% last year, Deloitte said. Of those, half said they planned to fly and 28% expected to pay “significantly more” for their trips than they did in 2019 due partly to inflation and more savings.  

“After two years of the pandemic, we were long overdue to make up for lost time with family,” said Andres Olarte who recently returned with his family from a five-week trip to Costa Rica. It was his first trip back to his hometown since 2019 and the first time many of his family and friends got to meet his youngest son, born in 2021.

“We booked our flights months in advance but did splurge getting direct flights,” he said.

POST-PANDEMIC LIST: 100 things we can’t wait to do when the pandemic ends: Hug friends, go to concerts and more

BRIGHTER SUMMER: What will COVID-19 look like this summer? Health experts say the virus won’t be endemic, yet.

Price insensitivity 

Airfares are also likely to continue rising, boosted by ongoing strong demand and elevated oil prices. World benchmark Brent crude was last above $117 per barrel, and JPMorgan analysts see prices above $120 this year. 

But none of that has deterred consumers. 

“They’re planning and anticipating for it and paying the higher price,” said Matthew Howe, senior manager of travel intelligence at research firm Morning Consult. “Revenge travel is definitely a real thing. People have been waiting and are ready to get back out and experience the world.” 

RECOVERING TIME: Didn’t travel at all during COVID-19? How to make up for lost time and lost opportunities

FLIGHT BOOSTS: Southwest is changing its in-flight experiences: 5 things coming this year and next

Although Ed Bastian, Delta chief executive officer, is optimistic air travel will stay strong into the fall, he warned on the earnings call he’s always on the lookout for consumer price resistance.

“When we start to see pricing, particularly with high input costs like fuel, starting to challenge our demand and supply assumptions, then we’ll take the next step up,” Bastian said.

To ensure operations go smoothly this summer, airlines have trimmed their flight schedules to give themselves some wiggle room if something goes awry. On Thursday, Delta joined American, Spirit Airlines, Alaska Air and JetBlue in cutting some flights to its summer schedule so it could “minimize disruptions and bounce back faster when challenges occur,” it said in a statement on its website.

While consumers may benefit from better service, fewer seats will likely mean more competition for existing seats and even higher prices.

Don’t want to pay up? Tips for finding lower airfares 

For those who want to fly but avoid chasing ever-increasing prices this summer, Expedia travel expert Christie Hudson offers some tips: 

► Timing travel

Of all the summer months, August is the cheapest. The “sweetest spot” is the last two weeks of the month as some schools go back in the south and it’s right at the end of summer before Labor Day, she said. 

Mid- to early-week travel days are the least expensive with Fridays the most expensive. 

Avoid traveling on summer holidays like the 4th of July, which tends to be the most expensive. 

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SAVE BIGGER: The battle for Spirit Airlines just got more interesting: Airline says it will entertain JetBlue’s $3.6 billion offer

► When to book

Usually, booking airfare is the cheapest two weeks to a month in advance of your travel days. If you’re a planner and that seems too close for your comfort, Hudson suggests booking further out while using a price match guarantee service. 

► Package booking 

If you’ll also need a place to stay, Hudson recommends booking all your travel in one place to get a package rate. These are deals on airfare and lodging that are only available through packages, she said.

The bonus is that you can still get your airline miles and rewards. “So, you’re saving money and collecting rewards,” she said. 



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Anxious about summer travel? Experts have tips to keep worried travelers comfortable


SUMMER TRAVEL. MARCIE: TRAVEL IS DEFINITELY BACK IN FULL SWING. YOU CAN SEE JUST HOW BUSY IT IS HERE AT PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BUT EXPERTS TELL ME THERE ARE ILSTL A LOT OF PANDEMICEA FRS, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION, IT’S JUST SHIFTED A BIT. >> WE’VE SEEN SORT OF TWO SISDE OF THE SAME COIN. MARCIE: IN THE CROWDS AND ALONE, THE PANDEMIC HAS CREATED CHA.OS >> I JUST THINK WE HAVE TO GET OVER IT EVENTUALLY. >> I’M NOT SURE WHY PEOPLE ARE SO EAGER TO REEMBRACE A LACK OF EMPATHY. MARCIE: AMONG TRAVELERS. >> I THINK EVERNYBODY HAS THE RIGHT TO AND THE FREEDOM TO ARWE A MASK OR NOT WEAR ONE. >> IT’S JUST THE RESPONSIBLE THING TO DO TO MODEL GOOD BEHAVIOR. MARCIE: WE ARE SEEING IT ALL. SOME DROPPED THEIR MASHE TKS SECOND THE REQUIREMENT ENDED WHILOTE HERS ARE HOLDING TIGHT TO FACE COVERINGS AND DISTANCE . DOCTORS SAY IT IS CLEAR FOR MANY COVID IS STILL A STRUGE.GL >>N OONE HAND, PEOPLE KIND OF JUST WITH COVID FATIGUE, JUST TIRED OF THE WHOLE TNGHI. AND NOW AFRAID TO GET BACK IN TO THE WORLD. MARCIE: DR. ANTHONY MANNARINO IS THE CHAIR OF PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH FOR ALLEENYGH HEALTH NETWORK. HE S AYS WITH COVID RESTRICTIONS LOOSENED, WE HAVE TO LET GO A LITTLE T.OO >> IT’S RMNOAL TO BE SOMEWTHA AFRAID. I MEAN, THE PANDEMIC HAS MADE A LOT OF PEOPLE SICK AND MYAN PEOPLE HAVE DIED. ARNELY A MILLION PEOPLE IN THE U.S.. THAT IS A LOT OF PEOE.PL SO IT’S NORMAL TO BE AFRAID TO GET BACK IN TO THE WORLD. MARCIE: DR. MANNARINO SAYITS SHOULD HAPPEN THOUGH AT YOUR OWN PACE. >> I WOULD SAY IT IS KIND OF LIKE GOING INTO A SWIMMING POOL WITH COLD WATER. YOU PUT YOUR TOEINS FIRST AND THEN YOUR FEET AND YOUR LEGS. JUST DO IT GRADUALLY UNTIL YOU’RE MORE COMFORTABLE. BUT IF U AVOID IT, YOUR FEAR IS JUST GOING TO GO UP. MARCIE: MNAANRINO SAYS IT MAY BE A PROCESS TO GETAC BK OUT AND FEELING SAFE IN THE WAY YOU DID PRE-PANDEMIC. ESPECIALLY HE SAYS IF YOU’VE BEEN INSIDE AND AVOIDING PEOPLE AND TRAVEL. >> I WOULD ADVISE PEOPLE TO TAKE ONE SMALL STEP AT A TIME SO IF THEY WANT TO GO TO A RESTAURTAN FOR EXAMPLE, GO TO A RESTAURANT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WEEK. NOT ON THE WEEKEND. GO WHEN IT’S LIKELY TO BE LSES CROWDED THAN MORE CROWDED. IF YOU ARE GOING TO A MALL, DO NOT GO ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 1:00. GO AT 8:00 ON TUESDAY NIGHT WHEN LE SS PEOPLE WILL BE THERE. BE COMFORTABLE AND TAKE SMALL STEPS FORWARD TO INTIGRANGTI YOURELF IN TO THE WORKPLACE,N TO THE COMMUNITY, ENTER RESTAURANTS, ENTER THE MALL, GOING ON VACATION. OTHERWISE, WE WILL ALL STAY INDOORS FOR THE REST OF OUR LIVES. WE CAN’T DO THAT. MARCIE: SO AS THE WORLD STARTS TO SLIDE BACK TOWARDHE WRE WE WERE MORE THAN TWO YEARS AGO, WITH MASK MANDATES DROPPED JUST ABOUT EVERYWHERE, >> I WILL DO ANYTHING TO STAASY PROTECTED AS I CAN. MAIE:RC DR. MANNARINO SAYS IT IS STILL OK TO DECIDE FOR YOURSELVES. >> I HAVE YOUNG CHILDREN AT HOME. MARCIE: AS LONG AS YOUR CHOICES AREN’T CONTROLLED BY FEAR AND THAT YOU’RE GETTING OUT. NO MATTER WHAT IT TAKES. >> A LOT OF PSCHYING MYSELF UP AND MAKING SURE I TAKE THE PRECAUTIONS THAT I CAN. MARC:IE DR. MANNARINO SAYS WHATS MOST IMPORTANT IS THAT YOU DON’T HIDE OR STOP LIVING OUT OF WORRY. >>F I THEY ARE GOING TO WAIT IT OUT, THEY ARE GOING TO HAVE TO WAIT A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT LIKE COVID IS GOING TO BE AROUND FOR THE INDEFINITE FUTURE. MARC

Anxious about summer travel? Experts have tips to keep worried travelers comfortable

The summer travel season is ramping up, but with the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, that means some folks are feeling travel anxiety.Dr. Anthony Mannarino is the chair of psychiatry and behavioral health for Allegheny Health Network. He says with COVID-19 restrictions loosened, we have to let go a little, too. “It’s normal to be somewhat afraid,” he said. “I mean the pandemic has made a lot of people sick and many people have died. Nearly a million people in the U.S., so it’s normal to be afraid to get back into the world.”Mannarino said it should happen though, at your own pace.“It’s kind of like going into a swimming pool with cold water. You put your toes in first, and then your feet, and your legs. Just do it gradually until you’re more comfortable, but if you avoid it, your fear is just going to go up.” Mannarino said it may be a process to get back out and feel safe in the way you did pre-pandemic. Especially, he says, if you’ve been inside and avoiding people and travel. “I would advise people to take one small step at a time,” he said. “So if they want to go to a restaurant, for example, go to a restaurant in the middle of the week, not on the weekend. Go when it’s likely to be less crowded than more crowded.”Mannarino said it is still OK to decide for yourself what you’re most comfortable with, as long as your choices aren’t controlled by fear. He said it’s important that you’re getting out. No matter what it takes. “If they’re gonna wait it out, they’re gonna have a long time to wait, because it looks like COVID is gonna be around for the indefinite future,” Mannarino added. If you are dealing with pandemic stress and trying to get back to pre-pandemic life, click here for additional tools.

The summer travel season is ramping up, but with the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, that means some folks are feeling travel anxiety.

Dr. Anthony Mannarino is the chair of psychiatry and behavioral health for Allegheny Health Network. He says with COVID-19 restrictions loosened, we have to let go a little, too.

“It’s normal to be somewhat afraid,” he said. “I mean the pandemic has made a lot of people sick and many people have died. Nearly a million people in the U.S., so it’s normal to be afraid to get back into the world.”

Mannarino said it should happen though, at your own pace.

“It’s kind of like going into a swimming pool with cold water. You put your toes in first, and then your feet, and your legs. Just do it gradually until you’re more comfortable, but if you avoid it, your fear is just going to go up.”

Mannarino said it may be a process to get back out and feel safe in the way you did pre-pandemic. Especially, he says, if you’ve been inside and avoiding people and travel.

“I would advise people to take one small step at a time,” he said. “So if they want to go to a restaurant, for example, go to a restaurant in the middle of the week, not on the weekend. Go when it’s likely to be less crowded than more crowded.”

Mannarino said it is still OK to decide for yourself what you’re most comfortable with, as long as your choices aren’t controlled by fear. He said it’s important that you’re getting out. No matter what it takes.

“If they’re gonna wait it out, they’re gonna have a long time to wait, because it looks like COVID is gonna be around for the indefinite future,” Mannarino added.

If you are dealing with pandemic stress and trying to get back to pre-pandemic life, click here for additional tools.



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CDC updates COVID-19 testing guidance for travelers


SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WGGB/WSHM) -Summer travel is right around the corner and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its COVID-19 testing guidance for travelers, including those taking vacations within the United States. The agency is now advising everyone, including those vaccinated and boosted, to get a COVID-19 test no more than three days before a trip.

Western Mass News took questions to a local travel expert to see how this might impact the upcoming vacation season and spoke with one local doctor to find out his thoughts about this updated COVID-19 guidance for travelers.

“We’re still kind of surging this omicron wave and we haven’t really peaked yet. The expectation is we’re going to get more cases and significantly more over the next two to four weeks,” said Dr. Esteban Delpilar, infectious disease doctor for Baystate Health.

New COVID-19 guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends that all travelers get a COVID-19 test at least three days before taking a trip, even if it’s within the United States. Western Mass News spoke with an infectious disease doctor from Baystate Health, to see if he believes this is a good added measure.

“You want to make sure that you’re okay before you leave and if you develop symptoms when you get there or when you come back you want to know was it something that was already incubating when I was still home and just developed symptoms wherever I went or was it something that I caught where I was and brought it back home,” said Dr. Delpilar.

The CDC previously recommended testing before traveling for people who were not vaccinated or up to date with their booster shots and still requires it for international travelers coming into the United States. AAA spokesperson Mark Schieldrop told us that despite the CDC’s recent updated COVID-19 travel guidance. He expects travel to return to 2019 levels as Memorial Day approaches.

“At this point in the pandemic, most people at this stage either feel comfortable about traveling or don’t, so a lot of folks have been flying over the past year,” said Schieldrop.

We asked Shieldrop for advice for travelers if they do end up testing positive before vacation.

“If there is a concern about your trip getting canceled or a similar issue because of COVID, that’s one reason, why we really encourage people to get trip insurance and make sure when you get that trip insurance there is a provision in there to cover covid related situations,” said Shieldrop.

Shieldrop also believes people traveling domestically will follow the CDC’s advice and take a COVID-19 test ahead of traveling.

“For many people stocking up on test kits and testing before you fly is a good idea and I think a lot of people will be doing that,” said Shieldrop.

Shieldrop also recommends that travelers continue to look to the CDC for the latest travel guidance.



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Japan to test tourism with reopening for 50 foreign travelers


Japan is preparing to welcome a small number of tourists back to the country after shutting its borders during the pandemic — but don’t count on being one of them.

In a test to prepare for a larger resumption of travel, the country is planning to allow about 50 vaccinated-and-boosted travelers to visit as part of organized tours later this month, the Japan Tourism Agency said Tuesday. The pool of 50 travelers will be allowed from four countries Japan has designated as priority markets: the United States, Australia, Thailand and Singapore.



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COVID-19 No Longer the Biggest Concern for Many Travelers


The latest installment of Longwoods International’s ongoing American Travel Sentiment Study indicates that record-high gas prices and soaring airfare costs have overtaken pandemic-related concerns for consumers as the summer travel season approaches.

According to the study, one-third of travelers said that gas prices will greatly affect their travel plans over the next six months, while one-quarter reported that the soaring price of plane tickets will impact them in a similar way.

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Only 19 percent of respondents said the COVID-19 pandemic now stands to greatly influence their travel decisions for the same timeframe.

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“Inflation, high gas prices, and generally rising costs are front of mind for travelers this summer season,” remarked Amir Eylon, President and CEO of Longwoods International. “However, competing with these concerns is the strong pent-up demand for post-pandemic travel, so the impact of prices may be somewhat muted by that surge in demand.”

Nine out of ten U.S. travelers now report that they’re planning on taking trips within the next six months, representing a complete rebound to trip-planning recorded prior to the start of the pandemic.

And, the 19 percent of survey participants who indicated that COVID-19 will heavily impact their travel plans for the next six months actually represents the smallest portion of respondents who’ve said the same since March 2020.

Longwoods began tracking travel consumer sentiment in the U.S. at the start of the pandemic and has continued to release updated survey findings and analyses on a bi-weekly basis.

The full results of its Wave 61 Travel Sentiment Study are available for download here.


car, gas, fuel, petrol, pump, filling station
Filling up at a gas station. (Photo via rclassenlayouts / iStock / Getty Images Plus)

Supported by Miles Partnership, the survey was fielded on May 11, 2022, using a randomly-selected national sample of 1,000 adult American consumers, ages 18 and over. Quotas for age, gender and region were applied to match U.S. Census targets, rendering the results representative of the U.S. population as a whole.

For more information, visit longwoods-intl.com/covid-19.





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10 Life-Saving Tips Travelers Need To Know About


Traveling the world is an exciting thing to experience but even the slightest inconvenience can turn the experience sour. It might not sound so severe but a simple bite from a mosquito or just a few minutes of exposure to harsh weather can result in severe health complications that could land travelers in medical centers and ruin the entire vacation. While no one wants to experience this, one has to be fully prepared to avoid it. This preparation includes getting armed with the right equipment for the journey and helpful tips such as these.

Every country has its specific emergency contact and in times of great need, knowing a country’s emergency contact can help save a life. With the emergency contact, travelers in danger or difficult situations can get directions to medical centers around the area or even request help.

9 Create An Emergency Backup Plan

Sometimes reaching the local security service or requesting an ambulance might be difficult and this can further complicate certain situations. To avoid getting stranded in difficult situations such as this, create a backup plan for the next action to take. A backup plan can be very important in the unfortunate situation of a stolen or lost bag containing all travel documents and mobile devices.

Related: 10 Important Documents To Carry When Visiting A New Country

8 Minimize The Number Of Valuables You Carry Around

While theft is something one might have to sometimes deal with, misplacing or having some important valuables stolen can leave a person devastated. Such important items should be locked up in safe places so the risks of losing them are reduced. If they are too precious, then it would probably be better to leave them back at home and replace them with the less valuable ones.

Related: Going On Vacation? Here Are The Best Travel Safety Essentials

7 Fill Someone In On Your Plans

Filing someone in on your travel plans is a part of an emergency plan as it can help them easily initiate a rescue mission in case they need to. A family member or friend can be a reliable party to send a copy of the travel itinerary.


6 Get Information About The Weather And Environment

The weather differs in different parts of the world hence it is important to always get this information about the destination before visiting. Travelers should always check the weather forecast of a destination before visiting. With this information, they can prepare for whatever they might face. Frostbite and sunburns are some consequences naive travelers face in different parts of the world. Thunderstorms, hurricanes, volcanic eruptions, and floods are also weather conditions that can immediately ruin a vacation and put travelers in grave danger. While the weather is one important thing to take into consideration, the physical state of the environment also matters. The destination may be infested with mosquitoes or fed with bad water. Knowing such information beforehand will help travelers stay ahead of the challenges and enjoy a safe vacation.


Not all items require extras but some important ones do. Imagine how helpful an extra battery can be when stuck in an unfamiliar location with a dead battery or how life-saving an extra can of water can be on a hot summer afternoon in the middle of a wilderness hike. Clothes and snacks are some other items that should come with extras.

4 Investigate A Transport Company Before Using It

Not all organized transport companies are good enough to use. Some may be working with scammers to rob or even kidnap the traveler. To avoid getting kidnaped or robbed, research the transport company and thoroughly investigate the vehicle’s information before getting in.


3 Research The Political State Of The Country

Political instability is an issue that affects both citizens and tourists in a country. Just like it would currently be unwise to visit a politically unstable country such as Venezuela or Ukraine, it would also be unwise to go to the country without learning about the country’s current state. Check the local news and see what is going on. If they are currently in the middle of a coup, dangerous elections, or several riots, then it will probably be wise to postpone the trip.

Being aware of one’s surroundings is important to staying safe in an unfamiliar destination. For this reason, travelers should drink responsibly in some destinations, especially when traveling solo to remain alert at all times. It is easier for a drunk person to fall into dangerous situations such as robbery or even kidnappings. When traveling in public transport, travelers should also be aware of their surroundings as well as the people sitting around. Such proximity can be all a pickpocketer needs to pull out some cash from an unsuspecting traveler.

1 Be Willing To Let Go Of Money Or Valuables To Get Out Of Some Situations

It’s just not worth it to stay in some dangerous situations just to prove you’re right. When threatened or faced with risky situations, it is best for travelers to spend some money to get out of such situations. Sometimes a few dollars can save one from serious delay or manhandling by locals. This also applies when faced with an armed robber. It would be wise to just give them what they want rather than getting stabbed or wounded fatally. Sadly, in some countries, even the security personnel threaten tourists just to get money from them. While one can handle this the legal way, it may sometimes lead to difficult situations so just give the bullies some few dollars and move on.



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National gas prices at all time high, travelers make changes around MA


More than half of Americans are planning to make travel changes because of rising gas prices, according to a recent AAA survey. But when it comes to summer vacations, many people are not letting those prices get in the way.

“When gas prices get this high, we definitely see behavior changes in people,” said Mary Maguire, AAA director of Legislative and Public Affairs in Massachusetts.

She added regular gas is at an all-time high average cost of $4.39 per gallon, while diesel is also at an all-time high at $6.27 per gallon.

“People will be driving less, working more from home and consolidating trips, among other things,” Maguire said. “They are finding they have no choice but to make adjustments.”

National average at all time high

“Americans felt gas prices were too expensive just a few weeks ago at $3.53 per gallon,” according to a statement from AAA. “Now with the national average at an all-time high of over $4, Americans may have reached a tipping point. Over half (59%) said they would make changes to their driving habits or lifestyle if the cost of gas rose to $4 per gallon. If gas were to reach $5, which it has in the Western part of the country, three-quarters said they would need to adjust their lifestyle to offset the spike at the pump.

“While many Americans may adapt their daily habits to make up for higher gas prices, it likely won’t have as much of an impact on summer travel. AAA’s survey found that 52% of Americans have plans to take a vacation this summer. Of those, 42% said they would not consider changing their travel plans regardless of the price of gas.”

As for how high (gas prices will get this summer), “it’s basically impossible to get a good gauge on where we’ll be this summer because of the wide range of possibilities,” said Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis at fuel savings app GasBuddy. 

Pump prices rose again over the past week due primarily to the high cost of crude oil, according to AAA. The cost of a barrel of crude continues to hover around $100. With the oil price accounting for about 60% of pump prices, the national average for a gallon of regular is now $4.39, an increase of 27 cents since April 25.

“As long as the supply remains tight, it will be hard for crude oil prices to fall and consumers will in turn face higher prices at the pump,” said Andrew Gross, a AAA spokesperson. “It now costs drivers in the U.S. about $23 more to fill up than a year ago.”

All prices rising

Overall, U.S. consumers are paying 8.5% more for goods and services compared with last year. The 18.3% increase in prices for gasoline Americans experienced in March accounted for most of the increase in last month’s overall Consumer Price Index, which rose by 1.2% from February. 

There are some Democrat-led proposals in the works to remedy the problem, including the “Big Oil Windfall Profits Tax,”  levying a per-barrel tax on major oil companies “equal to 50% of the difference between the current price of a barrel of oil and the pre-pandemic average price per barrel between 2015 and 2019,” according to a brief of the bill.  

Already four states – Maryland, Georgia, Connecticut and New York – enacted gas tax holidays to provide temporary relief. (Maryland’s holiday’s expired April 18 and New York’s doesn’t go into effect until June 1. At least a dozen states have considered implementing one. California, New Jersey and Delaware also are considering sending rebates.

Many Republican lawmakers are resurrecting calls to expand the Keystone XL pipeline, which they claim would lower gas prices and help the U.S. become even more energy independent.

President Biden prevented the expansion in one of his earliest executive orders citing environmental concerns. Keystone XL, which would ship crude oil from Alberta to existing pipelines and then on to the Gulf Coast refineries, would take years to construct and would not be assured to increase U.S. supplies. 

USA Today personal finance and markets correspondent Elisabeth Buchwald contributed to this article.



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