Wildcats Travel to Creighton – Villanova University


Villanova travels to Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, Dec. 5, to take on the Creighton Bluejays in a BIG EAST contest. The Wildcats enter play 3-4 overall and 0-1 in conference play, while Creighton is 4-2 on the year and 1-0 in league play.  Tip-off at Sokol Arena is set for 2 p.m., eastern time.
 
Sunday’s game against Creighton will be the 17th all-time meeting between the Wildcats and BlueJays. Creighton holds a 9-7 advantage in the series. Villanova won the only meeting between the teams last year by a score of 73-68 in a game played at Villanova on Dec. 19, 2020.
 
In Friday’s game at Providence, Villanova was led by grad student Brianna Herlihy who tallied 20 points on 7-of-17 shooting, including a 5-of-6 effort from the foul line. This was Herlihy’s first 20-point game of the season and the sixth of her career. She currently ranks second on the team in scoring at 12.1 points per game and she leads the team in rebounding with an 8.0 rebounds per game average. 
 
For her efforts in two games last week, sophomore forward Lior Garzon was named to the BIG EAST Weekly Honor Roll. In the two contests, she averaged 21.5 points per game, 2.5 rebounds per contest., 2.0 steals per game and 2.0 assists per contest. Her best scoring effort of the week came in a 22-point performance versus Temple. This is the second straight week that Garzon has earned Honor Roll honors.
 
Villanova is in the midst of a three-game road stretch. Following the loss to Providence on Friday night, the Wildcats will play at Creighton on Sunday, Dec. 5 and at James Madison on Dec. 9. After returning home to play Oregon State on Dec. 12, the Wildcats finish the stretch at La Salle on Dec. 21. Villanova is 2-2 in road contests this season.
 





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Catamounts Begin Two-Game Road Swing at Winthrop Saturday – Western Carolina University – catamountsports.com



Catamounts Begin Two-Game Road Swing at Winthrop Saturday – Western Carolina University  catamountsports.com



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Flu outbreak hits University of Michigan as some students prepare to travel for Thanksgiving holiday: “There’s vaccine fatigue”


Michigan is dealing with its first flu outbreak, local and state health departments report. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are is investigating the nearly 530 influenza cases reported at the University of Michigan—77% of them among the unvaccinated.  

While 98% of their student population has been vaccinated against COVID-19, only about a third have had the flu shot.

Dr. Lindsey Mortenson, the university’s medical director, blamed those numbers on “vaccine hesitancy or people just not making time to get it done.”

“There’s vaccine fatigue and they think the COVID vaccine protects against the flu virus, which it doesn’t. So I think there’s a lot of work we can do to keep our campus educated,” Mortenson said.

Another concern for University of Michigan officials is the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday.

They are worried students traveling back home for the holiday will become potentially more vulnerable to contracting the virus and spreading it once they come back.

“Michigan is also seeing some other viruses like RSV and influenza, which the state hasn’t seen in more than a year,” said Dr. David Donaldson, chief of emergency medicine at Beaumont Hospital.  

“That is a big difference as well,” Donaldson said.

The state is also seeing a surge in COVID-19 cases among unvaccinated people, health officials say.

The Food and Drug Administration moved to expand its emergency authorization of Pfizer’s and Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine booster shots to all adults on Friday.

In Royal Oak, 73-year-old Twyilla Harrelson has been hospitalized for two months with COVID-19, despite being fully vaccinated.

“If you’re not vaccinated, I tell you flat out you are a fool because that’s the worst thing that you can do is get out and spread this disease,” Harrelson told “CBS Mornings” lead national correspondent David Begnaud. 



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The Michigan State football travel guide: Indiana University


After surviving a weekend in Piscataway, the Michigan State Spartans are back on the road, taking on the Indiana Hoosiers down in Bloomington, Indiana.

If you are heading down to southern Indiana to catch the game, there are plenty of restaurants, bars and attractions on and near the campus of Indiana University to check out.

The Campus

Indiana University is one of the most historic universities in the Big Ten. Founded in 1820, Indiana is the third oldest in the conference, behind only the University of Rutgers and the University of Michigan. There are plenty of iconic landmarks throughout the more than 200-year-old campus.

Of course, for those making the trek down to the Hoosier state this weekend, Memorial Stadium, better known as “The Rock,” will be a central aspect of the trip. Don’t forget to take a peak at the prow of the USS Indiana, a former battleship of the U.S. Navy, which sits just outside the stadium.

It might be a good idea to park a bit farther than normal and stroll around Indiana’s campus on the way to the game.

“Just walk around,” Patrick Felts, a student at Indiana and the multimedia football reporter at the Indiana Daily Student, said. “I might be biased, but I don’t think there’s a more beautiful campus on the face of the earth.”

The most iconic start to a walk through Indiana’s campus starts at the Sample Gates, which guard the entrance to the oldest part of the university. It is a classic spot to snap photos for visitors and students alike. Right around the corner gates is Dunn Woods, a 20-acre patch of land with winding brick pathways cutting through forestry. The Rose Well House, a limestone gazebo, is a campus landmark found in Dunn Woods.

There is plenty of unique architecture found throughout the campus. Eskenazi Museum of Art, — designed by the same architect that designed the Louvre in Paris, I.M. Pei — Lilly Library and Beck Chapel are just a few of the standouts on the Bloomington campus.

Bloomington

Indiana University teaches more than 80 languages — perhaps that is why Bloomington has such a diverse representation of cuisine from around the world.

Eighteen countries are represented by over 75 international restaurants throughout Bloomington, with anything from Turkish to Thai clustered mostly on 4th street.

Also, pro tip from Felts: if you find yourself out on the town during or after a night at the bars and have a craving for sushi or teriyaki, Z & C Teriyaki & Sushi has you covered.

If you are looking for a staple of Bloomington’s pizza scene, Mother Bear’s Pizza is a local favorite.

“It is pretty much the iconic Indiana restaurant,” Felts said.

Those looking to consume their daily calories in the form of alcohol can find plenty of bars up and down the streets of Kirkwood Ave., the central road and artery of activity in Bloomington. Kilroy’s is one of the most popular bars in Bloomington, especially among the student base, Felts said.

Nick’s English Hut is a more family friendly bar that specializes in both booze and food, with Indiana apparel and pictures crowding the walls and creating a real college eatery experience. The bar is also known for “sink the biz,” a drinking game that includes a bucket of beer and a floating cup.

Surrounding the city are plenty of parks and forests for those looking to get more in touch with nature in southern Indiana. A short drive from campus is McCormick Creek State Park, Indiana’s oldest state park, complete with waterfalls and hiking trails.

Also not far from campus is the 202,814-acre Hoosier National Forest, which is especially scenic in the midst of autumn, Felts said. It is a bit of a further drive, but Felts said Brown County State Park, the largest of Indiana’s state parks, also offers the opportunity to hike through the nature of Indiana.

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The Michigan State football travel guide: Indiana University


After surviving a weekend in Piscataway, the Michigan State Spartans are back on the road, taking on the Indiana Hoosiers down in Bloomington, Indiana.

If you are heading down to southern Indiana to catch the game, there are plenty of restaurants, bars and attractions on and near the campus of Indiana University to check out.

The Campus

Indiana University is one of the most historic universities in the Big Ten. Founded in 1820, Indiana is the third oldest in the conference, behind only the University of Rutgers and the University of Michigan. There are plenty of iconic landmarks throughout the more than 200-year-old campus.

Of course, for those making the trek down to the Hoosier state this weekend, Memorial Stadium, better known as “The Rock,” will be a central aspect of the trip. Don’t forget to take a peak at the prow of the USS Indiana, a former battleship of the U.S. Navy, which sits just outside the stadium.

It might be a good idea to park a bit farther than normal and stroll around Indiana’s campus on the way to the game.

“Just walk around,” Patrick Felts, a student at Indiana and the multimedia football reporter at the Indiana Daily Student, said. “I might be biased, but I don’t think there’s a more beautiful campus on the face of the earth.”

The most iconic start to a walk through Indiana’s campus starts at the Sample Gates, which guard the entrance to the oldest part of the university. It is a classic spot to snap photos for visitors and students alike. Right around the corner gates is Dunn Woods, a 20-acre patch of land with winding brick pathways cutting through forestry. The Rose Well House, a limestone gazebo, is a campus landmark found in Dunn Woods.

There is plenty of unique architecture found throughout the campus. Eskenazi Museum of Art, — designed by the same architect that designed the Louvre in Paris, I.M. Pei — Lilly Library and Beck Chapel are just a few of the standouts on the Bloomington campus.

Bloomington

Indiana University teaches more than 80 languages — perhaps that is why Bloomington has such a diverse representation of cuisine from around the world.

Eighteen countries are represented by over 75 international restaurants throughout Bloomington, with anything from Turkish to Thai clustered mostly on 4th street.

Also, pro tip from Felts: if you find yourself out on the town during or after a night at the bars and have a craving for sushi or teriyaki, Z & C Teriyaki & Sushi has you covered.

If you are looking for a staple of Bloomington’s pizza scene, Mother Bear’s Pizza is a local favorite.

“It is pretty much the iconic Indiana restaurant,” Felts said.

Those looking to consume their daily calories in the form of alcohol can find plenty of bars up and down the streets of Kirkwood Ave., the central road and artery of activity in Bloomington. Kilroy’s is one of the most popular bars in Bloomington, especially among the student base, Felts said.

Nick’s English Hut is a more family friendly bar that specializes in both booze and food, with Indiana apparel and pictures crowding the walls and creating a real college eatery experience. The bar is also known for “sink the biz,” a drinking game that includes a bucket of beer and a floating cup.

Surrounding the city are plenty of parks and forests for those looking to get more in touch with nature in southern Indiana. A short drive from campus is McCormick Creek State Park, Indiana’s oldest state park, complete with waterfalls and hiking trails.

Also not far from campus is the 202,814-acre Hoosier National Forest, which is especially scenic in the midst of autumn, Felts said. It is a bit of a further drive, but Felts said Brown County State Park, the largest of Indiana’s state parks, also offers the opportunity to hike through the nature of Indiana.

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Cal 2021-22 Schedule Finalized – University of California Golden Bears Athletics



Cal 2021-22 Schedule Finalized


Kayla Lawrence

The Pac-12 officially announced the Bear’s 2021-22 conference schedule on Monday.


Pac-12 Announces TV Designations, Game Times for 2021-22 Women’s Basketball Season

SAN FRANCISCO – The 2021-22 Cal women’s basketball schedule was finalized Monday afternoon as the Pac-12 conference announced the full slate of television broadcasts, game dates and tip-off times. The Bears will play 29 regular-season games, including 18 on the Pac-12 Network.

Cal’s full schedule can be viewed here. For ticket information, visit CalBears.com/tickets or call (800) GO BEARS (462-3277) and press option 3.

Cal’s 2021-22 Haas Pavilion Fan Attendance Policy can be viewed here.

The 11-game non-conference slate, which was announced in August, includes eight home dates. Highlighting the non-conference schedule are the annual Cal Classic on Nov. 26-27 against Furman, Ole Miss, and San Diego State. Fresno State will come to Haas for the annual School Haas Rock game on Thursday, Dec. 2 at 11:30 a.m. PT.  

All 18 of Cal’s Pac-12 games will be televised on the Pac-12 Network this year. The Golden Bears begin conference play on the road when they travel to Pullman, Wash., to take on the Cougars on Friday, Dec. 31 at 7:00 p.m. Cal will ring in the new year in Seattle when they take on the Huskies on Sunday, Jan. 2 at 12:00 p.m.

The Bears get a favorable draw to end the regular season. Seven of Cal’s final 11 games will be located at Haas Pavilion. The final weekend of the regular season will take place against Washington schools on Thursday, Feb. 24 at 7:00 p.m. when the Huskies come to Berkeley and Saturday, Feb. 26 against Washington State at noon.  

Pac-12 Networks will air the first 10 contests at the 2022 Pac-12 Women’s Basketball Tournament, presented by New York Life, which is scheduled for March 2-6 at Michelob ULTRA Arena at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. The Conference’s postseason event has been permanently modified to feature an open date on Saturday, with 11 games spread out over five days, and Sunday’s championship will be carried on ESPN2 at 3 p.m. PT. Check pac-12.com/tickets for the most up-to-date information on tournament on-sale dates and special offers.

All Pac-12 Networks broadcasts are also available in HD via the Pac-12 Now app (for iOS, Android, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV). For more information and to see a list of the multiple options to access Pac-12 Networks anywhere across the United States, visit GetPac12Networks.com.

Stay Connected

For complete coverage of Cal women’s basketball, please follow the Bears on Twitter (@CalWBball), Instagram (@CalWBball) and Facebook (/CalWBball/).





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The Michigan State football travel guide: Rutgers University


The undefeated Michigan State Spartans return to the road this Saturday to take on the Rutgers Scarlet Knights on the east coast. 

Making your way to New Jersey to see the game in person? We have got you covered with a guide on the best sights, eateries and bars on and near the campus of Rutgers University.

A Historic Campus

Rutgers University is not only the oldest college in the Big Ten, it is one of the oldest in the country. Founded in 1766, the university now consists of five campuses stretching through Piscataway and New Brunswick. 

Rutgers holds the unique title of the “birthplace of college football”. Right on College Avenue is a statue commemorating the first-ever college football game between New Jersey (which eventually became Princeton) and Rutgers.

The statue is a central aspect of a gameday tradition called “the Scarlet Walk”. As the players arrive off the bus, they make sure to touch the statue on their way to the SHI Stadium as fans and the band cheer them on. 

The statue is one of many sights present on or near College Avenue, as the street strikes through the heart of campus.

Historic buildings, the student center, the main dining hall, the library and “the yard” (an open field on campus lined with restaurants that is often a hub of gameday activity) are all present on the street. Walking through College Avenue on gameday is one of the best ways to experience Rutgers campus, Aaron Breitman, Rutgers University alumnus and Managing Editor of Rutgers’ SB Nation site, On the Banks, said. 

“You hear the chatter and the energy hits you,” Breitman said.

Conveniently, near the library on College Avenue is Deiner Park, which has a bridge across the Raritan River to the stadium.

Right around the corner from College Avenue are a few iconic campus stops; the Kirkpatrick Chapel and Zimmerli Art Museum. The chapel, constructed in the 1800s, is a popular destination for weddings in the area (especially among Rutgers alumni) and one of the oldest surviving buildings. The Zimmerli Art Museum is one of the largest university museums in the country.

The Bar and Tailgating Scene

With a noon kickoff, those looking to tailgate are going to have to get up bright and early to pregame for the matchup. The lots open up at 7 a.m.

“The big joke used to be that everyone would tailgate and then not go into the game,” Breitman said. “Even when they were bad, there was a good tailgating vibe. It’s definitely a fun environment.”

But with an improving team and homecoming in town, Michigan State fans and students heading to the game should prepare for a raucous environment before and during the game.

If you are looking to celebrate (or forget) the results of the game, there are plenty of bars just off of campus in New Brunswick. 

“In terms of total package, like location and people, there are two major bars at Rutgers,” Dylan McCoy, a journalism senior at Rutgers and Associate Sports Director at The Daily Targum. “Old Queens Tavern and the Scarlet Pub,”

The bars are across the street from each other. 

The Food

Is there a better way to start or end gameday than with all your daily calories stuffed into a single hoagie bun — aptly named the “fat sandwich”? 

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One of the most iconic gameday foods in New Brunswick is the fat sandwich, which is essentially everything but the kitchen sink stuffed onto a hoagie bun. 

“It’s basically a bunch of bar food on a sandwich,” McCoy said.

Everything from mozzarella sticks to mac and cheese is on the sandwiches found on the menu of RU Hungry. While there are various iterations of the sandwich, nearly every version is adorned with a handful of french fries.

Also, if you’re in the mood to punish yourself, there is an open challenge to consume five fat sandwiches in 45 minutes. Win, and you get your own fat sandwich creation featured on the menu. 

Food trucks are an essential part of the food scene on gameday, lining up the road on Scarlet Knight Way near the tailgating lots. RU Hungry began as a food truck back in the 70s. Stuff Yer Face is another quintessential restaurant for Rutgers students, providing stromboli and a wide variety of beers. 

Also, being an east coast school, a discussion of the food at Rutgers would be incomplete without mentioning pizza.

“The pizza in New Jersey is the best in the country. 100 percent,” McCoy said.

There are plenty of options around town, many of which focus on delivering that classic east thin-crust style slice that is iconic in the region.

“If you’re not from the east coast, most of the places will stand out,” Breitman said. 

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The Michigan State football travel guide: Rutgers University


The undefeated Michigan State Spartans return to the road this Saturday to take on the Rutgers Scarlet Knights on the east coast. 

Making your way to New Jersey to see the game in person? We have got you covered with a guide on the best sights, eateries and bars on and near the campus of Rutgers University.

A Historic Campus

Rutgers University is not only the oldest college in the Big Ten, it is one of the oldest in the country. Founded in 1766, the university now consists of five campuses stretching through Piscataway and New Brunswick. 

Rutgers holds the unique title of the “birthplace of college football”. Right on College Avenue is a statue commemorating the first-ever college football game between New Jersey (which eventually became Princeton) and Rutgers.

The statue is a central aspect of a gameday tradition called “the Scarlet Walk”. As the players arrive off the bus, they make sure to touch the statue on their way to the SHI Stadium as fans and the band cheer them on. 

The statue is one of many sights present on or near College Avenue, as the street strikes through the heart of campus.

Historic buildings, the student center, the main dining hall, the library and “the yard” (an open field on campus lined with restaurants that is often a hub of gameday activity) are all present on the street. Walking through College Avenue on gameday is one of the best ways to experience Rutgers campus, Aaron Breitman, Rutgers University alumnus and Managing Editor of Rutgers’ SB Nation site, On the Banks, said. 

“You hear the chatter and the energy hits you,” Breitman said.

Conveniently, near the library on College Avenue is Deiner Park, which has a bridge across the Raritan River to the stadium.

Right around the corner from College Avenue are a few iconic campus stops; the Kirkpatrick Chapel and Zimmerli Art Museum. The chapel, constructed in the 1800s, is a popular destination for weddings in the area (especially among Rutgers alumni) and one of the oldest surviving buildings. The Zimmerli Art Museum is one of the largest university museums in the country.

The Bar and Tailgating Scene

With a noon kickoff, those looking to tailgate are going to have to get up bright and early to pregame for the matchup. The lots open up at 7 a.m.

“The big joke used to be that everyone would tailgate and then not go into the game,” Breitman said. “Even when they were bad, there was a good tailgating vibe. It’s definitely a fun environment.”

But with an improving team and homecoming in town, Michigan State fans and students heading to the game should prepare for a raucous environment before and during the game.

If you are looking to celebrate (or forget) the results of the game, there are plenty of bars just off of campus in New Brunswick. 

“In terms of total package, like location and people, there are two major bars at Rutgers,” Dylan McCoy, a journalism senior at Rutgers and Associate Sports Director at The Daily Targum. “Old Queens Tavern and the Scarlet Pub,”

The bars are across the street from each other. 

The Food

Is there a better way to start or end gameday than with all your daily calories stuffed into a single hoagie bun — aptly named the “fat sandwich”? 

Do you want the news without having to hunt for it?
Sign up for our morning s’newsletter. It’s everything your friends are talking about and then some. And it’s free!

One of the most iconic gameday foods in New Brunswick is the fat sandwich, which is essentially everything but the kitchen sink stuffed onto a hoagie bun. 

“It’s basically a bunch of bar food on a sandwich,” McCoy said.

Everything from mozzarella sticks to mac and cheese is on the sandwiches found on the menu of RU Hungry. While there are various iterations of the sandwich, nearly every version is adorned with a handful of french fries.

Also, if you’re in the mood to punish yourself, there is an open challenge to consume five fat sandwiches in 45 minutes. Win, and you get your own fat sandwich creation featured on the menu. 

Food trucks are an essential part of the food scene on gameday, lining up the road on Scarlet Knight Way near the tailgating lots. RU Hungry began as a food truck back in the 70s. Stuff Yer Face is another quintessential restaurant for Rutgers students, providing stromboli and a wide variety of beers. 

Also, being an east coast school, a discussion of the food at Rutgers would be incomplete without mentioning pizza.

“The pizza in New Jersey is the best in the country. 100 percent,” McCoy said.

There are plenty of options around town, many of which focus on delivering that classic east thin-crust style slice that is iconic in the region.

“If you’re not from the east coast, most of the places will stand out,” Breitman said. 

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Encounters with octopi, oyster farms and ocean views: Life at the Duke University Marine Lab


As senior India Haber headed to the laundry room at Duke’s Marine Lab to switch her clothes to the dryer, she suddenly had a bucket with an octopus shoved into her hands. 

Daniel Rittschof, Norman L. Christensen distinguished professor of environmental sciences, had spotted Haber from across the quad and had called her over to hold the octopus, before promptly leaving it with her. 

The octopus tried to crawl out of the bucket, but Haber managed to wrestle it back in long enough to text her friends to come see it. She released it into the ocean before doing her laundry. 

Encounters with octopi aren’t as common as dolphin sightings at the Marine Lab in Beaufort, N.C., but students there are guaranteed to see creatures more exciting than the West Campus squirrels.  

The Marine Lab is three hours away from Durham on Piver’s Island, which Duke shares with the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. But it’s far more than just a lab: it has dorms, a dining hall, a library, multiple research labs, a drone lab, classroom spaces and abundant views of the ocean. 

Chosen for its location on the southern tip of the Outer Banks, the Marine Lab has access to the distinctive ocean off Cape Hatteras and the salt marshes and estuaries along the coast. The Rachel Carson Reserve, with its wild ponies, is a short kayak distance away.

The Marine Lab functions year-round with resident natural scientists and social scientists working together, according to Andy Read, the director of the Marine Lab and Stephen A. Toth distinguished professor of marine biology in the Nicholas School of the Environment. 

“We bring that kind of breadth and interdisciplinarity to solving problems in a way that I don’t think any other Marine Lab in the world does,” Read said.

The Shearwater Research Vessel.

Courtesy of Sophie Maginnis

The Shearwater Research Vessel.

Every season offers a different way to experience and learn at the Marine Lab. The fall semester is similar to the fall term at Duke’s main campus, but in the spring, students can enroll in travel courses that take marine learning to a global scale. Students enrolled in travel courses have spent time in Singapore, Australia and on the Shearwater, a multimillion-dollar research vessel at the Marine Lab. 

Summer terms offer classes like organic chemistry that many students take to fulfill pre-health requirements. Heading straight to the swim dock after lecture or to the beach after an exam makes studying chemical reactions slightly more tolerable.

Some students, like Haber, knew they wanted to go to the Marine Lab when applying to Duke. 

Haber is spending her third semester at the Lab this fall. She started at the Lab in 2020 when the University’s COVID-19 restrictions limited much of the typical main campus experience.

One of Haber’s favorite parts of the Lab is the close-knit community there, she said. 

“Even the [doctoral] students who are your professors will come and hang out with you at lunch and chat about whatever in the world they want to,” Haber said.

She enjoys the community coffees, where everyone on the island comes together to drink coffee and chat between class times. The informal meetings and networking that happen on the island have helped her build relationships with professors.

Everyone goes by their first name at the Marine Lab, including professors. And with the small class sizes, it’s easy to get to know everyone. This intimacy is what Read likes most about the Marine Lab.

“We’re small, so everybody gets lots of attention. We look after each other and we have a really strong culture,” Read said. 

The island setting also fosters a focused environment. Students are removed from the busyness of the Durham campus and have time to focus on research and independent projects. 

“The Marine Lab offers a slightly decompressed experience,” Read said. 

View of the Boathouse and one of the dorms on the main quad.

View of the Boathouse and one of the dorms on the main quad.

Students can also destress by spending time with the campus cats: the overweight tabby Captain Sly, another tabby called Third Cat and Domino, a black and white cat who’s friendly with the security guards. 

There are a range of research opportunities at the Lab. Haber studies dolphin echolocation by sitting out on the Shearwater or at the docks and eavesdropping on dolphin calls under the water. Another student, senior Maddie Paris, studies parasites in clams. 

One year, Read got a call from a former student working for the local whale-stranding network in the Outer Banks. She told him that they had found a sperm whale that had beached and died, and she offered to give Read part of the whale to dissect. 

Read wanted to give his Marine Mammals class the chance to dissect the whale’s head. But transporting the head of a 25-foot-long juvenile sperm whale wasn’t easy. The head had to be dragged from the sandbar off Hatteras Island, placed in a truck and transported by ferry to the Marine Lab. The dissection was “spectacularly messy,” Read said.

Classroom flexibility is a hallmark of studying at the Marine Lab. 

“You’re outside at night, and you’ve never been outside at night, and you run into something like an alligator, or a very large fish, or something tiny like a blue crab. Then I learn how people think and what excites them,” Rittschof said. “I try and customize the laboratories and the kinds of exercises they do to things they find interesting because if they’re fun, they’re much more productive.” 

About a 20-minute boat ride away from the Marine Lab is the campus aquafarm created in 2018 by Thomas Shultz, assistant professor of the practice of marine molecular conservation and director of undergraduate studies at the Marine Lab. 

The oyster farm occupies a 0.6-acre square plot in the ocean marked off with four poles and five lines of black mesh bags each filled with 150 to 200 oysters. As students stand waist-deep in the water and flip bags, they occasionally find stone crabs shyly burying themselves underneath the collected oysters. 

“The aquafarm is about students getting their feet in the mud, which is very much a Marine Lab experience,” Shultz said. “You can jump off the boat, get your feet in the mud, go raise some food, some delicious oysters.”

Paris, the student who is researching parasites in clams, is spending her fourth semester at the Marine Lab this fall—and she is loving it. 

“If you can possibly change your schedule and make it work, you should come here at least for a summer,” Paris said. “It’s not for everyone all the time, but there’s a little something for everyone. And if you like community, and you like being outside, even a little bit, it’s the place to be.” 





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