Visitors to tip of Cape York could be charged in Pajinka traditional owners’ plan


The “trip to the tip” is the ultimate pilgrimage for conquistador four-wheel drivers, and its popularity has grown with the closure of international borders.

The Northern Peninsula Area (NPA) is Queensland’s northernmost mainland council area and has about 3,000 residents, made up of the five communities of Bamaga, Injinoo, Seisia, Umagico, and New Mapoon. 

Since about April the NPA estimates 80,000 visitors passed through, putting exceptional pressure on its resources.

Earlier this year, reports surfaced that some traditional owners of Pajinka — the tip of Cape York — wanted to close the site to the public, but that did not eventuate. 

Some businesses say the threat of closure drove a tourist season that was busier than usual, but now community leaders are looking ahead to how the region can be better equipped to benefit from the annual influx of four-wheel-drivers.

A sign at the entry to Bamaga which reads "use water wisely" and level 6 restrictions
The Northern Peninsula Area ran out of water in August, at the height of tourist season. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)

Diesel in demand

At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Cape York was physically barricaded from the rest of Queensland under federal biosecurity legislation, to protect its vulnerable communities.

Coupled with interstate travel restrictions, 2020 was a disappointing year for tourism businesses in the region, but ABC reported earlier this year some were anticipating 2021 would be the busiest tourist season in a decade.

Bewan Idai managed the service station in Bamaga and said there was a rush of visitors at the start of the season.

“There was one period there, I think it was  right when the tourist season kicked off, because it was such a mad rush to get up to the tip everyone was, ‘Oh, we’re not sure if it’s going to close or not’; everyone was rushing through.

“Our diesel sales have … pretty much doubled in some stages there .. because of the diesel vehicles coming through,” Mr Idai said.

He said it was not quite his busiest tourist season ever, but it was up there.

“It was enough to kind of keep my staff busy; [enough to] keep them running off their feet at some points.

A man stands next to a diesel bowser
Bewan Idai manages the service station in Bamaga and says there was a rush early this year.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)

Robert Poi Poi is the chairman of Bamaga Enterprises, which manages a range of businesses, including the town’s resort.

“There’s a big difference, compared to previous [seasons] … we’ve made, like, 50 per cent more than previous years.

“We definitely had plenty of tourists this year,” Mr Poi Poi said.

‘We weren’t really prepared for it’

The NPA is a unique area, made up of five distinct communities over about 1,000 square kilometres.

When ABC visited the region in November, residents were subject to level 6 water restrictions.

But in August, at the height of tourist season, the town’s water supply broke down with a major water leak, and essential services like the local school, were closed.

A woman stands in front of a blue painting
Patricia Yusia says the area’s water infrastructure failed in August under pressure from tourists.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)

Mayor Patricia Yusia said the community’s water infrastructure was old and could not cope with the pressure added by the thousands of tourists that passed through.

“It needs to be upgraded, and you know if there if we go in the way we a lot of people are interested in coming up here we need to have a bit more investment into NPA.”

Mayor Yusia said at times, the town tripled in size with tourists.

“You can hardly drive, there’s so many people, so many cars … there’s just cars everywhere.”

“We’ve only got couple of supermarkets, and they get inundated; there’s hardly anything on the shelves for the locals when the tourists stay here,” Ms Yusia said.

“We’ve been just overwhelmed by the tourists; we weren’t really prepared for it.”

With the supermarket, service station and campgrounds operated by private entities, council’s only income from drive tourists is the Jardine Ferry.

A wide green river surrounded by dry trees.  ferry is at the edge of the river
The Jardine River is the town’s water source, and the ferry pictured is the council’s only source of income from tourists.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)

She said tourists were welcome to the region, and acknowledged the benefits of the industry to the local economy, but noted the community needs help to manage the influx of people during the tourist season.

Tourists to pay to visit the Tip

Traditional owners of Pajinka are planning to charge visitors on arrival to the area. 

The site was handed back to traditional owners in 2019, which gives them rights to manage the area.

Earlier this year there were widespread reports that the Gudang Yadhaykenu Aboriginal Corporation (GYAC) would close Pajinka to the public, to protect the area from further damage, but it did not happen.

A rock with graffiti on it
Traditional owners say graffiti, rock cairns and rubbish have been issues at Pajinka for years.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)

But moving forward, corporation chair Michael Solomon said the corporation would be setting up an entry station to collect fees from tourists. 

He said a fee would encourage more tourists to be more respectful and would give the owners the funds to create a better experience for tourists.

Mr Solomon described disrespectful behaviour shown by tourists as “very, very hurtful”.

two portaloos standing next to bushland
Toilet facilities currently at Pajinka.(ABC Far North: Jemima Burt)

GYAC is yet to decide a on how much tourists would pay, or develop the infrastructure needed for a toll booth at the entry to Pajinka, but those in charge said earning income off the site would provide long-term benefits. 

“If we would have the money, we could have solved a lot of problems with that place, lot of issues and all this stuff,” Mr Solomon said.

“I want to make things happen for my, you know, future grandchildren, children and their children on this thing, you know, rest of the clan groups.”

The rocky, seaside outcrop of the tip of cape york from the air
Pajinka has been managed by the Gudang Yadhaykenu Aboriginal Corporation since 2019. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter )



Source link

New Digital Tour Allows Visitors To Explore Ancient Olympia During First Olympics


The ancient Olympics in Greece may have been held more than 2,000 years ago, but it’s now possible to explore ancient Olympia through an immersive experience using a mobile app or using a PC or laptop. This is all thanks to a collaboration between Greece’s Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports and Microsoft. 

The project, called Ancient Olympia: Common Grounds, is a digital revival project “that aims to preserve and restore” the original home of the Olympic games using artificial intelligence (AI). It uses augmented reality to deliver a virtual re-creation of temples and competition areas as visitors walk through the ruins. 

Visitors who travel to the Athens Olympic Museum in Greece can also take a virtual tour that makes use of Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 mixed-reality headset, which overlays visual information on top of what the viewer actually sees to create an augmented reality experience.

“With the digital representation of the Panhellenic sanctuary of Ancient Olympia, its cultural heritage — but also the values of Olympism: peace, harmony, excellence, and noble rivalry — becomes accessible to the whole world through the use of state-of-the-art technology,” Lina Mendoni, Hellenic Republic Minister of Culture and Sports, said in a statement. “The digital preservation project, through the use of artificial intelligence and augmented reality technologies, implemented through the cultural sponsorship of Microsoft, promotes and highlights the unique and emblematic archaeological site of Ancient Olympia.”

Brad Smith, president and vice chairman of Microsoft, added that the project is “a stunning achievement in cultural heritage, bringing together humanity and cutting-edge technology to benefit the world and empower coming generations with new ways to explore our past.”

How It’s Possible

The first step in the project was for Microsoft to partner with the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports. Next, through its AI for Cultural Heritage initiative, Microsoft partnered with Iconem, which specializes in digitizing historic sites, to create the foundational model of ancient Olympia. 

Both on-the-ground cameras and drones were used to take hundreds of thousands of images of the sites. Microsoft’s AI then processed the images to create models that are photorealistic.

Ancient Olympia: Common Grounds digitally preserves 27 monuments, including the original Olympic Stadium, temples of Zeus and Hera, and the workshop of the renowned sculptor Phidias. In the 3D experience, these buildings are recreated in lifelike detail thanks to research completed by the Hellenic Ministry’s archaeologists.

“Ancient Olympia: Common Grounds is a unique way of experiencing Greece’s proud cultural heritage,” Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Greece’s prime minister, said. “Visitors around the world can virtually visit the ancient site of Olympia and experience history firsthand using augmented reality technology.”

A Unique Experience

The first immersive tour was held earlier this week at the Athens Olympic Museum. Seventh and eighth-grade students from a local school “pinched, zoomed, and rotated the monuments that had been brought to life on their smartphones, flipping between inside and outside views as they toured the site where athletes in antiquity competed in running, javelin throwing, wrestling, boxing, horse racing, and other events,” an Associated Press story reports.

“The app is really impressive,” Panagiotis Christopoulos, one of the students, said in the story. “I think it can help with teaching in schools.”

Prime Minister Mitsotakis was also at the event. While watching the students, he told the Associated Press, “I’m absolutely thrilled that we’re able to present to the world a completely new cultural experience using technology to recreate the ancient world of Olympia.”

How You Can Take The Tour

The Ancient Olympia: Common Grounds Exhibition using the HoloLens 2 Virtual Tour is now open to the public at the Athens Olympic Museum. 

The good news is that you don’t need to travel to Greece to take the tour. The web experience may be viewed here, while an app may be downloaded from the iOS and Android app stores so you can take the virtual tour using your smartphone.

Be sure to also read all of our Greece coverage. You can also check out our history and culture coverage, including ruins and archaeology, architecture, and monuments.



Source link

As the Biden Administration Lifts Travel Bans on Visitors to the U.S., Museums Hope It Will Boost Lagging Attendance


This week, the Biden administration lifted restrictions on its pandemic travel ban, allowing vaccinated visitors from Canada, China, Mexico, and other countries to enter the U.S. for the first time in 18 months. For major American museums, where international visitors have historically accounted for major portions of yearly attendance figures, the news was surely welcomed. 

Visitor numbers dropped roughly 70 percent at the Art Institute of Chicago, for example, from roughly 1.5 million to 420,000 in the 2020 fiscal year, according to a museum spokesperson. In previous years, international guests accounted for 25 to 30 percent of ticket buyers, representing about $5 million in admission revenue.

“We are optimistic about the return of international travelers, but know that return will be gradual,” the representative said, noting that, for the time being, the institution is “continuing to focus primarily on local audiences.”

The Smithsonian, which doesn’t charge admission and thus can’t track where visitors come from, saw similar decreases in its overall numbers during the same period of time, according to its public engagement data. Attendance numbers dipped 67 percent across the Smithsonian’s various museums, from roughly 23.3 million to 7.6 million in the 2019 fiscal year.  

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Courtesy of the museum.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Courtesy of the museum.

Meanwhile the New York Times reported this week that, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where international travelers account for about a third of attendance, daily visitor numbers have been cut in half since the start of the pandemic. And the effects have been even greater when it comes to admission profits, since the museum has a pay-what-you-want policy in place for New Yorkers. 

However, not every institution can expect a bump in foot traffic with the amending of travel restrictions. At the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, a southern institution less frequented by foreigners than those on the coasts (90 percent of the museum’s annual visitors are local), the change to the travel ban will likely have no noticeable impact, a representative said. 

In the last fiscal year, 455,000 visitors came to the museum, down from nearly a million during the previous cycle. But the museum has rebounded like few others have: “At this time, attendance is back above pre-pandemic levels,” the museum spokesperson said.

Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.



Source link

US lifts pandemic travel ban, opens doors to visitors


The U.S. is easing restrictions on travel from a long list of countries, including Mexico, Canada and most of Europe, allowing tourists to make long-delayed trips and family members to reconnect with loved ones after more than a year and a half apart because of the pandemic.

COVID-19 has upended lives in many ways, including through restrictions on travel. That has been felt acutely by those living near U.S. borders, where traveling back and forth was a way of life.

New rules go into effect Monday that allow nonessential travel across America’s land borders for vaccinated visitors. Customs and Border Protection says foreign travelers coming into the U.S. must be prepared to present proof of vaccination at checkpoints.

Citizens and permanent legal residents of the U.S. are not required to present proof of vaccination.

Nonessential travel into the U.S. from Canadian and Mexican border checkpoints has been closed since March 2020. While Canada reopened nonessential travel to those seeking to enter from the U.S. earlier this year, the White House held off lifting such restrictions on foreign travelers for several months.

U.S. towns on the southern border are hoping Monday’s reopening will bring a flood of visitors to the businesses that rely on them.





Source link

The U.S. lifts the pandemic travel ban and opens the doors to international visitors


The U.S. lifted restrictions Monday on travel from a long list of countries including Mexico, Canada and most of Europe, allowing tourists to make long-delayed trips and family members to reconnect with loved ones after more than a year and a half apart because of the pandemic.

Starting Monday, the U.S. is accepting fully vaccinated travelers at airports and land borders, doing away with a COVID-19 restriction that dates back to the Trump administration. The new rules allow air travel from previously restricted countries as long as the traveler has proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test. Land travel from Mexico and Canada will require proof of vaccination but no test.

Airlines are expecting more travelers from Europe and elsewhere. Data from travel and analytics firm Cirium showed airlines are increasing flights between the United Kingdom and the U.S. by 21% this month over last month.

The change will have a profound effect on the borders with Mexico and Canada, where traveling back and forth was a way of life until the pandemic hit and the U.S. shut down nonessential travel.

Malls, restaurants and Main Street shops in U.S. border towns have been devastated by the lack of visitors from Mexico. On the boundary with Canada, cross-border hockey rivalries were community traditions until being upended by the pandemic. Churches that had members on both sides of the border are hoping to welcome parishioners they haven’t seen during COVID-19 shutdown.

Loved ones have missed holidays, birthdays and funerals while nonessential air travel was barred, and they are now eager to reconnect.

River Robinson’s American partner wasn’t able to be in Canada for the birth of their baby boy 17 months ago because of pandemic-related border closures. She was thrilled to hear the U.S. is reopening its land crossings to vaccinated travelers.

“I’m planning to take my baby down for the American Thanksgiving,” said Robinson, who lives in St. Thomas, Ontario. “If all goes smoothly at the border I’ll plan on taking him down as much as I can. Is crazy to think he has a whole other side of the family he hasn’t even met yet.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. will accept travelers who have been fully vaccinated with any of the vaccines approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, not just those in use in the U.S. That means that the AstraZeneca vaccine, widely used in Canada, will be accepted.

For air travelers, the airlines are required to verify vaccine records and match them against ID, and if they don’t, they could face fines of up to nearly $35,000 per violation. Airlines will also collect information about passengers for contact tracing efforts. There will be CDC workers spot-checking travelers for compliance in the U.S. At land borders, Customs and Border Protection agents will check vaccine proof.

The moves come as the U.S. has seen its COVID-19 outlook improve dramatically in recent weeks since the summer delta surge that pushed hospitals to the brink in many locations.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.





Source link

US lifts pandemic travel ban, opens doors to visitors


The U.S. lifted restrictions Monday on travel from a long list of countries including Mexico, Canada and most of Europe, allowing tourists to make long-delayed trips and family members to reconnect with loved ones after more than a year and a half apart because of the pandemic.

Starting Monday, the U.S. is accepting fully vaccinated travelers at airports and land borders, doing away with a COVID-19 restriction that dates back to the Trump administration. The new rules allow air travel from previously restricted countries as long as the traveler has proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test. Land travel from Mexico and Canada will require proof of vaccination but no test.

Airlines are expecting more travelers from Europe and elsewhere. Data from travel and analytics firm Cirium showed airlines are increasing flights between the United Kingdom and the U.S. by 21% this month over last month.

The change will have a profound effect on the borders with Mexico and Canada, where traveling back and forth was a way of life until the pandemic hit and the U.S. shut down nonessential travel.

Malls, restaurants and Main Street shops in U.S. border towns have been devastated by the lack of visitors from Mexico. On the boundary with Canada, cross-border hockey rivalries were community traditions until being upended by the pandemic. Churches that had members on both sides of the border are hoping to welcome parishioners they haven’t seen during COVID-19 shutdown.

Loved ones have missed holidays, birthdays and funerals while nonessential air travel was barred, and they are now eager to reconnect.

River Robinson’s American partner wasn’t able to be in Canada for the birth of their baby boy 17 months ago because of pandemic-related border closures. She was thrilled to hear the U.S. is reopening its land crossings to vaccinated travelers.

“I’m planning to take my baby down for the American Thanksgiving,” said Robinson, who lives in St. Thomas, Ontario. “If all goes smoothly at the border I’ll plan on taking him down as much as I can. Is crazy to think he has a whole other side of the family he hasn’t even met yet.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. will accept travelers who have been fully vaccinated with any of the vaccines approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, not just those in use in the U.S. That means that the AstraZeneca vaccine, widely used in Canada, will be accepted.

For air travelers, the airlines are required to verify vaccine records and match them against ID, and if they don’t, they could face fines of up to nearly $35,000 per violation. Airlines will also collect information about passengers for contact tracing efforts. There will be CDC workers spot-checking travelers for compliance in the U.S. At land borders, Customs and Border Protection agents will check vaccine proof.

The moves come as the U.S. has seen its COVID-19 outlook improve dramatically in recent weeks since the summer delta surge that pushed hospitals to the brink in many locations.

___

Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.

Copyright
© 2021 . All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.





Source link

US Lifts Pandemic Travel Ban, Opens Doors to Visitors | U.S. News®


By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press

The U.S. lifted restrictions Monday on travel from a long list of countries including Mexico, Canada and most of Europe, allowing tourists to make long-delayed trips and family members to reconnect with loved ones after more than a year and a half apart because of the pandemic.

Starting Monday, the U.S. is accepting fully vaccinated travelers at airports and land borders, doing away with a COVID-19 restriction that dates back to the Trump administration. The new rules allow air travel from previously restricted countries as long as the traveler has proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test. Land travel from Mexico and Canada will require proof of vaccination but no test.

Airlines are expecting more travelers from Europe and elsewhere. Data from travel and analytics firm Cirium showed airlines are increasing flights between the United Kingdom and the U.S. by 21% this month over last month.

The change will have a profound effect on the borders with Mexico and Canada, where traveling back and forth was a way of life until the pandemic hit and the U.S. shut down nonessential travel.

Political Cartoons

Malls, restaurants and Main Street shops in U.S. border towns have been devastated by the lack of visitors from Mexico. On the boundary with Canada, cross-border hockey rivalries were community traditions until being upended by the pandemic. Churches that had members on both sides of the border are hoping to welcome parishioners they haven’t seen during COVID-19 shutdown.

Loved ones have missed holidays, birthdays and funerals while nonessential air travel was barred, and they are now eager to reconnect.

River Robinson’s American partner wasn’t able to be in Canada for the birth of their baby boy 17 months ago because of pandemic-related border closures. She was thrilled to hear the U.S. is reopening its land crossings to vaccinated travelers.

“I’m planning to take my baby down for the American Thanksgiving,” said Robinson, who lives in St. Thomas, Ontario. “If all goes smoothly at the border I’ll plan on taking him down as much as I can. Is crazy to think he has a whole other side of the family he hasn’t even met yet.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. will accept travelers who have been fully vaccinated with any of the vaccines approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, not just those in use in the U.S. That means that the AstraZeneca vaccine, widely used in Canada, will be accepted.

For air travelers, the airlines are required to verify vaccine records and match them against ID, and if they don’t, they could face fines of up to nearly $35,000 per violation. Airlines will also collect information about passengers for contact tracing efforts. There will be CDC workers spot-checking travelers for compliance in the U.S. At land borders, Customs and Border Protection agents will check vaccine proof.

The moves come as the U.S. has seen its COVID-19 outlook improve dramatically in recent weeks since the summer delta surge that pushed hospitals to the brink in many locations.

Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Source link

Germany Updates Travel Restrictions for Visitors From 6 Third Countries & 3 Dutch Overseas Territories


Germany’s high-risk list has shrunk down by six third countries and three Dutch overseas territories on Friday, November 5, upon a joint assessment of the Federal Ministry of Health, the Foreign Office and the Federal Ministry of the Interior, Building and Home Affairs.

The move has been announced by the Robert Koch Institute, which is Germany’s agency and research institute responsible for disease control and prevention. According to the announcement, the following third countries were removed from the high-risk list last Friday:

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Grenada
  • Jamaica
  • Cuba
  • Myanmar
  • St. Lucia

At the same time, the Netherlands’ overseas territories of Aruba, Curaçao and St. Martin have also been removed from the list.

The decision means that starting from Sunday, November 7, vaccinated travellers reaching Germany from these countries are now subject to fewer entry restrictions. They will no longer have to register before travelling to Germany nor quarantine upon arrival.

Non-vaccinated travellers from these countries, however, can enter Germany only for absolutely essential purposes.

No new countries have been added to the list of high-risk areas. Yet, the list still consists of sixty-something countries, including here Egypt, Albania, Croatia, Lithuania, Latvia, Singapore, the United Kingdom, Ukraine, etc.

When entering the Federal Republic of Germany following a stay in a high-risk area or area of variants of concern outside of Germany, a special obligation to register, quarantine and furnish proof has to be observed,” the RKI notes.

All travellers aged 12 reaching Germany from the countries in the high-risk list are obliged to register at einreiseanmeldung.de and then carry the confirmation of registration with them when showing up at Germany’s borders.

They also must upload proof of vaccination or recovery in the same portal when registering. Upon arrival in Germany, quarantine is obligatory for those who have failed to upload proof of vaccination or recovery. However, it can be ended once the proof is uploaded to the portal.

As for those who reach Germany with COVID-19 negative test results, they can end quarantine no earlier than in the fifth day of the quarantine, with a second test taken, the results of which are also negative.

Currently, only the residents of the countries in the EU’s list of epidemiologically safe third countries can enter Germany restriction-free. The list currently includes Australia, Argentina, Bahrain, Chile, Colombia, Hong Kong, Jordan, Canada, Qatar, Kuwait, Macau, Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Taiwan, Uruguay, United Arab Emirates, and China, which is currently subject to reciprocity. Argentina, Colombia, Namibia, and Peru were added to this list only last week.

>> Who Can Travel to Germany Amid COVID-19 & What Are the Rules



Source link

Unvaccinated US visitors under 18 will not need to quarantine, per CDC


play

Unvaccinated children visiting the United States will not need to quarantine upon arrival under the country’s new travel rules, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday.

The new U.S. air travel system, which goes into effect Nov. 8, requires vaccinations among most foreign tourists. Some travelers – such as children under 18 and people with a history of negative reactions to COVID-19 vaccines – are exempt from the vaccination requirement. 

According to an amended document signed by CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, noncitizens under 18 years old who are not immigrating to the U.S. will still need to fill out an attestation form that says they will arrange to get tested for the coronavirus three to five days after arrival, but they will not need to promise to arrange a seven-day quarantine period after arrival. 

“Based on the potential difficulty that self-quarantine may pose to children under 18 years of age especially when accompanied by a vaccinated parent or guardian who is not required to self-quarantine, CDC has determined that self-quarantine should not be required,” the order reads. 

► Vaccines for kids: FDA authorizes Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for kids 5-11

Foreign travelers under 18 years old also do not have to agree to receive a vaccination after arrival “given the still evolving circumstances of vaccination for children,” according to the document. They will still need to quarantine if they develop COVID-19 symptoms or their post-arrival test is positive.

CDC documents released Monday said all foreign nationals traveling to the U.S. who are exempt from the vaccine mandate would need to quarantine seven days upon arrival or potentially face fines or penalties.

Parents planning to visit the U.S. took to social media, questioning whether the quarantine mandate applied to children, many of whom are too young to get inoculated. Others worried they would have to cancel planned family trips to the country. 

► Who is exempt?: These select groups of unvaccinated foreign travelers can enter the US 

The updated guidance differs slightly from statements made earlier this week by Cindy Friedman, the CDC’s chief of the traveler’s health branch, who said unvaccinated children would only be exempt from quarantine if they were traveling with vaccinated adults. 

“CDC believes that this approach fairly balances the interests of families traveling to the United States with protecting the public health,” the updated CDC document says. “CDC guidance strongly recommends vaccination for all eligible children under 18.”

Follow USA TODAY reporter Bailey Schulz on Twitter: @bailey_schulz





Source link