World Famous in New Zealand: Why there’s only one way you should see Devonport


This is the ideal combination of fun and discovery.

On the wharf, meet up with Devonport-local Pauline, of Magic Broomstick Tours. You’ll be shown how to ride this marvellous, self-balancing machine – it’s so easy – and then follow her on a cruise along the waterfront, pausing at the points of interest.

There are so many of them, and most you would go past without noticing, so the inside knowledge is invaluable. Then, carry on skimming effortlessly right up to the top of Maungauika North Head for terrific views of the harbour and city, and the extra bonus of some wartime history. You will walk through some of the dark, echoing, hand-dug tunnels that thread through the hill to the gun pit, where Pauline tells you all about the big gun installed there against the threat of a Russian attack in the 1880s.

Seeing Devonport via Segway offers an ideal combination of fun and discovery.

Pamela Wade

Seeing Devonport via Segway offers an ideal combination of fun and discovery.

READ MORE:
* World Famous in New Zealand: Flying over the America’s Cup course
* World Famous in New Zealand: Auckland Town Hall Tour
* World Famous in New Zealand: L’Arte Cafe and Gallery, Taupō
* $50 challenge: How to spend a day in Auckland on a budget

Devonport is full of history, both naval and domestic.

Pamela Wade

Devonport is full of history, both naval and domestic.

WHY GO?

Because nobody ever rode a Segway without a permanent grin. Plus, you get to enjoy so many of Devonport’s hidden treasures, which include, unexpectedly, a giraffe and a pair of concrete greyhounds.

Humming through the quiet back streets, between North Head and Mt Victoria, you’ll see beautiful, old villas painstakingly restored, set in lovely gardens, and hear insider gossip about some of them. You’ll make a note to come back to those tearooms by the sea you go past, or that tempting French café and the cute museum inside an old church.

Mt Cumbria Reserve’s peaceful lawns offer a temptation to attempt the machine’s dizzying 18.5km/h top speed, before you wend back downhill again. You’ll pause under a big pōhutukawa to look for Bertie (or Beatrice) the cockatoo, pass the lovely, renovated old Elizabeth House (party central for the Wrens during WW2) and stop again under Old Albert, the Moreton Bay fig tree that’s well over a century old.

Musicians will enjoy tutting at the mistake on the nearby band rotunda surround. And then it’s all over –and it’s guaranteed you won’t want to get off.

The playground in Windsor Reserve offers hours of fun.

Pamela Wade

The playground in Windsor Reserve offers hours of fun.

INSIDER TIP

If you’re coming from the city, make life easy and take the ferry across the harbour. Everything you’ll want to do in Devonport is within walking distance.

ON THE WAY/NEARBY

Allow plenty of time for a good look around Devonport’s varied shops, eateries and art galleries, and to admire the stylish library. The playground, with its Bean Rock tower, is irresistible for children and, a pleasant stroll away along Torpedo Bay’s sandy beach, the Navy Museum is full of interest – don’t miss the boatshed out the back.

At the Visitor Information caravan on the wharf, they’re happy to offer suggestions and advice.

The prime spot for city protection is also ideal for city and harbour views.

Pamela Wade

The prime spot for city protection is also ideal for city and harbour views.

HOW MUCH?

Tours and prices range from $45.50 per person for a shorter ride, up to $130 each for the 2.5 hour Historic North Head option. Riders must be aged over 10 years. There are three daily tours in summer, two in winter, or by appointment.

BEST TIME TO GO

Choose a fine day for maximum enjoyment and great views over the harbour. See magicbroomsticktours.co.nz



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>